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  • Electrical: Electrical cheating

    Hey all. I'm trying to cheat my way to turn this engine over (53 straight 6) I've removed all the wires from everything except the ground to the back of the generator and the positive to the starter. Yes I know this is backwards. I'm using a 12v battery for test purposes and the whole car is going to be rewired and switched to 12v so I'm not buying a 6v battery.
    I put 12v to the top lug seen in this picture of the starter and nothing happened. Does the small lug need 12v too?

  • #2
    Well, with no nut to hold the copper strap to the top lug on the solenoid, it would be quite possible to hook your jumper cable clamp to the top lug, and have Zero current make it to the starter.
    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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    • #3
      momentary 12v to the start contact on the starter solenoid. Basically hook up a starting circuit, per the wiring diagram with a simple push button switch, or a jumper from the Battery lead to the small S winding.

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      • #4
        Connect the jumper directly to the lug on top of the starter after cleaning all of the dirt, corrosion and paint off of the terminal. The starter should energize if the starter, battery and connections are good. Bud

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        • #5
          Not a good way to try and use the starter to turn over the motor as you have no control. The starter will draw many amps; heat or spark at the connection and you might get burnt or worse.
          If you insists on doing it any way
          First Disconnect all wires going to and from the generator. and the large terminal on the bottom of the solenoid None are needed to turn over the engine and clean all contact points
          Second you need wire of at least 0 gauge. Good jumper cables
          Third You need a nut on the top terminal of the solenoid.
          Forth you need a solid connections to the engine itself from the negative or positive terminal of the battery. The starter motor does not care.
          To turn over the engine touch the other lead from the battery to the terminal you installed a nut on
          If you are not on your way to emergency medical care the engine should turn over; if all is good including the starter.

          As others have mentioned a better way use a remote starter switch and connect one of its wires to the small unused terminal on the solenoid and the other wire to the terminal on the battery you are using for ground.
          You still need to ground the battery to the engine and install a nut on the top terminal
          Then take the 0 gauge wire and connect it to the large unused terminal on the bottom of the solenoid. You did remove the old wire didn't you?
          Press the button on the remote starter and again the engine should turn over. and you should not need a trip to emergency care.
          Ron

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          • #6
            Originally posted by gordr View Post
            Well, with no nut to hold the copper strap to the top lug on the solenoid, it would be quite possible to hook your jumper cable clamp to the top lug, and have Zero current make it to the starter.
            Ok, I have that nut just removed it to take the wires off. I'll put it back on.



            To the others I'm using a remote trigger to energize the starter. Just didn't know if the small bolt on the starter played a role. Thanks.

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            • #7
              That small stud is not on the starter; it's on the starter solenoid, which is really just a high-current relay. Back in '51, the cars used a solenoid which needed a ground supplied to that small stud to make it switch the battery to the starter. Later cars, that used key start, used a solenoid that required a battery-voltage signal from the key switch applied to that small stud, to make it do its thing. I'm not sure when the change was made. No matter. Replace the nut on the strap to the starter. Put your 12 volt battery in the battery tray, and hook it up one way or the other. For your stated purpose, it doesn't matter. Make sure all the lights and accessories are off. Hook one wire from your remote starter switch to the small stud on the solenoid, and the other to ground. If nothing happens when you push the button, move the other wire from ground to the hot side of the battery, and try again. This is one of the few instances where a wrong connection won't fry anything; it just plain won't work.
              Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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              • #8
                Not mentioned here is that a 1953 motor was 6V positive ground. 1956 and later was 12V negative ground. Definitely use the solenoid.

                I would have thought that you would want the case of the starter, solenoid and motor to be positive, and the negative goes to the non-strap side of the solenoid. The strap takes the negative to the starter motor when it is activated - i.e. with a small negative current to the small post.

                Make sure all other car electrical is disconnected.

                If you just want to test the motor, I would first ensure it is free (with a wrench to the crank bolt), and if so, then borrow a 6V battery hooked up correctly to start it. It is not worth blowing out all of the 6v electrical.

                There is a 6V to 12V guide that was available through Randy Rundle that advises how to switch everything over to 12V. Unfortunately, Randy died recently - not sure if guide is still available.

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