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  • Body / Glass: Holes

    My car is a 56 P-Hawk modified to 3 on the floor w/ OD and purchased with no rear seat. I'm currently rust converting my trunk and floor with Corroseal. Then I will paint it with Krylon farm equipment epoxy paint. I've taken everything out of the interior and now want to patch up all the dozen or so holes. Some are rust holes, some I made to install Toyota seats, some by previous owners, and some presumably were made by Studebaker.
    So my question is, should I leave some holes for water/moisture drainage? How many would be original from the factory? Where would the factory holes be? And what is the purpose of the 'D' shapes cut into the floor?
    Also, see picture of hole in bell housing, why is it there and should I put a plug in it? (or duct tape it CASO style?)
    Thanks,
    Rafe Hollister
    Attached Files

  • #2
    There shouldn't be any holes in the floor or trunk floor. Water is more likely to get in than out of such holes.

    I assume that Corroseal is similar to POR-15, in that it it stops rust?

    There are drains in the door bottoms that should be kept clean.

    -Dwight

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    • #3
      The D - shaped holes should be in the rear footwells and AFAIK are there to provide drainage and are factory correct. I left them in my 54K.

      Bob

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      • #4
        When I put new floors in my coupe I sealed it so that NO moisture could get in. I guess if you have a convertible you might think that drains are important.

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        • #5
          The hole in the bell housing was, if I recollect correctly, an assembly aid when installing the trans at the factory. I have seen them with tape over them from the factory. HVAC metal backed duct tape is far superior to the fabric kind. It is rumored to be good past 350 mph.

          Remember, when sealing holes in the floor, that Studebakers were not any more watertight than they were oil tight. Maybe leaving some drain holes in low places, like the footwells, wouldn't be a bad idea.

          JT

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          • #6
            I have some 'bitch-a-thane' home window flashing... super sticky back foil. It should make a good cover for the bell housing hole. I think I will give some thought about which holes to leave in, but I like the idea of filling all of them. I have the 1st coat of Krylon farm implement epoxy in Ford Gray (very light ) done. This stuff goes on very thick and takes 58 hours to dry. It looks soooo good and the light color makes it easy so see what will eventually be under Kilmat sound deadener and carpet.
            Rafe

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            • #7
              On my 55 K body, the round 7/16" holes had panel plugs in them. Like these: http://www.mcmaster.com/hole-caps/me...panel-plugs-8/
              I think there may be about a dozen including in the trunk and floor.
              54 Commander Coupe driver
              53 Commander Hardtop project
              SE Washington State

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              • #8
                You could put aluminum tape over the bell housing hole and never have any problem. BUT, it is there for a purpose. It's a vent. The rotating flywheel and clutch creates a low pressure/partial vacuum that might pull oil past the rear main seal and/or cause the clutch disc to be slow to release its grip. (Most clutch disc rivets have a hole through the middle to prevent that.
                I have seen small round eave or soffit vents used over that hole.
                "Burning Bridges...Lost Forevermore"......

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                • #9
                  I always leave the factory drain holes open, in trunk and in floorboard. They are all strategically located and, unless you plan to float the car like a boat, NOTHING is gonna get in through those holes, they are there to drain water out, because the door and trunk seals leak like a sieve in hard rain. Without any drain holes, it can stay wet/damp inside for months, that's why so many Studes have rusted out floorboards and trunk floors.

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                  • #10
                    OK, Joe. I see your point. I am installing new weatherstrip seal around trunk, and am realizing it will not seal very well. So trunk holes will stay open.
                    Attached Files

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                    • #11
                      Thom, my GT was in pretty good original condition (with a repaint and some minimal body work) when I got it and has ZERO rust in any of the floors. The holes in my trunk have what I assume are factory rubber plugs in them. When I replaced the original dried out seam seal I smeared some over those plugs too. I haven't pulled up the interior carpet, but from underneath the car all the penetrations had been sealed by undercoating long before I got the car. I know the guy I got it from didn't do the under coat, so if it wasn't done by the original selling dealer, it was at least done before 1980. I know the trunk rails of these cars are prone to rusting through under the weather strip too. Mine are pristine. But, I don't get much rain here, about 4" last season, none since april and usually none till halloween. I also have no need to drive it in the rain and am far enough from the coast not to get wet with that either. Draw whatever conclusion you may.

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