Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Replace a-arm bushing in-car?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 6hk71400
    replied
    Originally posted by rbarvai View Post
    Thanks Joe! As a last resort I can take it to my mechanic...
    I remember advice on the forum years ago to take a Studebaker with king pins to a truck service center with the shop manual in hand. The reason behind this was that many trucks used a king pin system. Ball joints started in 1952 with Ford products and most local mechanics are familiar with the newer suspension.

    My local mechanic for my 97 Olds had a 1953 Buick Special, last year for a Straight Eight Buick. He got the points in for the owner (no start) but the car was running rough. Tim said he was not familiar with older cars. I mentioned good luck but check the dwell and timing, distributor cap and wires just for a heads up.

    Best of Luck and keep us posted

    Bob Miles
    Keep her pointed in the right direction

    Leave a comment:


  • rbarvai
    replied
    Thanks Joe! As a last resort I can take it to my mechanic...

    Leave a comment:


  • JoeHall
    replied
    Originally posted by rbarvai View Post
    Thanks but I spent an entire afternoon searching the archives without luck, though of course I could have missed something. The other bushings show some signs of age but are all well centered so I would think the rubber inside could be okay. The bad one has seriously deteriorated rubber and is well off center. I'm still collecting advice and a bit hesitant to take everything apart at this point. My level of expertise could be considered "shade tree," and a full disassembly job might end up being more than bargained for. But I'm still thinking on it.

    Thanks to everyone who has responded so far.
    Totally understand. Too bad you are in PA and I am in KY. If more local, we'd get together and git er done, all eight of them, in about 8 hours. Sometimes I think it would be nice to have a mobil repair truck, setup for Studebakers, but getting too old anyway. LOL

    IMHO, to replace any one of those eight bushings, still mounted in the car, requires a higher level of skill. But maybe you can find someone local to help you with just the one.

    Leave a comment:


  • Topper2011
    replied
    ***********

    Leave a comment:


  • rbarvai
    replied
    Thanks but I spent an entire afternoon searching the archives without luck, though of course I could have missed something. The other bushings show some signs of age but are all well centered so I would think the rubber inside could be okay. The bad one has seriously deteriorated rubber and is well off center. I'm still collecting advice and a bit hesitant to take everything apart at this point. My level of expertise could be considered "shade tree," and a full disassembly job might end up being more than bargained for. But I'm still thinking on it.

    Thanks to everyone who has responded so far.

    Leave a comment:


  • JoeHall
    replied
    Originally posted by rbarvai View Post
    I have one bad bushing (inner, rear) on the passenger side lower control arm on my '55 Champion. The rest look okay. Is there a procedure for R&R of such a bushing without removing the arm? I found a reference to doing so in an old thread but no detailed description, other than using an air chisel and a jack stand. I'd really like to avoid tearing the suspension apart for just one bushing.

    Thanks, Rich
    Don't be fooled by the 'one bad bushing' that you see. About 99 percent probability is, the rest need replacing too, including the uppers. Take the time to disassemble per the Shop Manual, and replace all 8 bushings. But, to answer your question, yes it's possible to replace one bushing, without removing the 'A' arm, but you won't find the procedures in the Shop Manual, so you will need to search the archives here, to learn how a few others have done it.

    Leave a comment:


  • r1lark
    replied
    Originally posted by oilnsteel View Post
    I did it once. Never again.
    JT
    ........................
    Last edited by r1lark; 07-28-2021, 07:33 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • altair
    replied
    I don't think it is that mysterious and dangerous job. Jack the car up under the spring well clear and then block the frame, let the frame down so that it is just touching the blocking. Remove the threaded outer bushing, if extremely tight, adjust the weight on the hydraulic jack up or down and keep trying. It may take some assistance with a long pipe on the breaker bar. It will eventually come out, when it is out lower the jack just enough to clear the inner threaded bushing, now remove the inner bushing it should just unthread out. With the new inner bushing threaded in raise the jack until it lines up and thread in the outer bushing.

    Leave a comment:


  • oilnsteel
    replied
    I did it once. Never again.

    JT

    Leave a comment:


  • Jeffry Cassel
    replied
    I think you could do it. Be careful! I have heated them with a propane torch to get the center out, This will stink so ventilation is important. Be sure there is nothing flammable any where near. I have cut the outer shell with a hacksaw. Just cut thru shell and don't cut A arm. This will make it way easier to hammer and chisel the shell out. Studebaker on line sells Delrin replacements hat are way easier to install than the rubber ones.

    Leave a comment:


  • r1lark
    replied
    This can be done, BUT I sure would use a spring compressor on the spring to collapse it some so it's not putting pressure on the lower a-arm. Just putting a jackstand under the a-arm and crossing your fingers that the a-arm doesn't slip off the jackstand and let the a-arm move suddently would in my mind be taking a BIG chance! The spring has a huge amount of energy stored in it when compressed, and can do a lot of damage and injury. Others have done it without using a spring compressor, but I had safety pounded into my head over my 40 years in the power industry so am extra cautious.

    I have removed bushings with an air chisel before, that does work. Now I have a bushing remover/installer kit that works well. Look at this thread: https://forum.studebakerdriversclub....l-arm-bushings for discussion of the bushing remover/installer.

    As far as a specific written procedure to do this, I don't know of one. Have you tried the search function on this forum? There are a number of threads regarding a-arm bushing replacement, including this one: https://forum.studebakerdriversclub....removal-needed. Sometimes you have to make several tries at a search, using different word combinations.

    Another suggestion is to looking on Bob Johnstone's excellent technical site (https://studebaker-info.org/), he has a fair amount of info on bushing replacements also. Here is one example from Bob's site: https://studebaker-info.org/Tech/Sus...as/delrin.html Bob has a Google search function on the 'home' page that is easy to use.
    Last edited by r1lark; 07-26-2021, 07:39 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Replace a-arm bushing in-car?

    I have one bad bushing (inner, rear) on the passenger side lower control arm on my '55 Champion. The rest look okay. Is there a procedure for R&R of such a bushing without removing the arm? I found a reference to doing so in an old thread but no detailed description, other than using an air chisel and a jack stand. I'd really like to avoid tearing the suspension apart for just one bushing.

    Thanks, Rich
Working...
X