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  • Engine: Supercharger service

    One of our chapter members just acquired a 1958 Golden Hawk. He does not have access to a computer so I volunteered to help out.

    1. It is unknown how long it has been since the supercharger had a fluid change. I understand it is to be 3,000 miles. Shop manual says to change the fluid to get a syringe to draw out the 8 oz of fluid then refill. What type of ATF should be used?

    2. The owner is older but has grandkids of driving age. Is there a heavy duty ATF that can help with "spirited driving" ?

    3. 3,000 rpm is from my understanding that the boost is felt. 4,500 is probably max before valve float occurs. Since it is a 3speed overdrive, normal driving will probably be 2,000 rpm to 2,500 rpm. Will this be good for longer life before a rebuilt?

    Thanks for your help. I will pass on this to Ed and learn something in the process.

    Bob Miles
    Blower in the wind

  • #2
    The best method for fluid replacement is to dump it out. For normal service, and a quick and easy way, take the belt off, put a vacuum line from the engine into the fill tube, run the car outdoors until the smoke clears. This also gives a top lube. Do not do this with synthetic fluids. If you forget to take the belt off first, remove the supercharger and have it rebuilt.
    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

    Comment


    • #3
      Easiest is to go to harbor freight, and buy a "Master-Vac" hand pump. Then you can stick a suction hose into the dipstick opening, and suck out the old fluid with no mess no fuss, and no mosquito fogging necessary. Replentish with Type F transmission fluid, or the non synthetic "Trick-Shift" transmission fluid.
      Bez Auto Alchemy
      573-318-8948
      http://bezautoalchemy.com


      "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by bezhawk View Post
        Easiest is to go to harbor freight, and buy a "Master-Vac" hand pump. Then you can stick a suction hose into the dipstick opening, and suck out the old fluid with no mess no fuss, and no mosquito fogging necessary. Replentish with Type F transmission fluid, or the non synthetic "Trick-Shift" transmission fluid.
        Pardon my not knowing but what is "Trick-Shift" fluid? Is it a special racing ATF or is that the brand name?

        Thanks

        Bob Miles
        The trick is to get it to shift

        Comment


        • #5
          It is a aftermarket fluid sold in many parts stores. Equivalent to good type F fluid. Dexron is too slippery for traction of the drive element planetary balls, and will slip causing emanant destruction of your blower. You can order it from Summit.
          Bez Auto Alchemy
          573-318-8948
          http://bezautoalchemy.com


          "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

          Comment


          • #6
            Yes, don't use Merc-Dex. John Erb and CUNDN both recommended type F or FA -if you can find it. They also recommended periodic changes but I had Avanti for 30 yrs and never changed it. Never had a problem with it. Didn't change it 'cause it had correct fluid in it that was in good condition ; did not really know what to put in it and for a long time ATF menus were really limited. When you change fluids, there is always the chance of introducing crud into the system. Years ago the Army did a study: They took random vehicles and assigned them to one of 2 groups. One got normal maintainance and oil changes and the other just had lvels checked and no oil changes. The group with no oil changes had fewer problems than the regular maintainance group. (No, I am not advocating no oil changes!)

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Jeffry Cassel View Post
              Yes, don't use Merc-Dex. John Erb and CUNDN both recommended type F or FA -if you can find it. They also recommended periodic changes but I had Avanti for 30 yrs and never changed it. Never had a problem with it. Didn't change it 'cause it had correct fluid in it that was in good condition ; did not really know what to put in it and for a long time ATF menus were really limited. When you change fluids, there is always the chance of introducing crud into the system. Years ago the Army did a study: They took random vehicles and assigned them to one of 2 groups. One got normal maintainance and oil changes and the other just had lvels checked and no oil changes. The group with no oil changes had fewer problems than the regular maintainance group. (No, I am not advocating no oil changes!)
              How many miles did you put on that Supercharger and how often did you take the engine over 5,000 rpm?

              David L

              Comment


              • #8
                Unknown and Unknown. The early V8's had valve float around 4,800 rpm. Total history unknown. Just ordered a gallon of Trick Shift from Summit Racing. I advised our member to wait on driving the car until the supercharger is cleaned out and fresh new fluid put in.

                Learned a trick from Bill Eastburn. He said put a small plastic tube in the dipstick port, run that to a glass jar with a home punched into the lid, the punch another hole in the lid and hook up to a vacuum cleaner. It will suck all the stuff out and the glass jar will not collapse like a plastic jar.

                Bob Miles
                Spinning, not free wheeling

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by 6hk71400 View Post
                  Unknown and Unknown. The early V8's had valve float around 4,800 rpm. Total history unknown. Just ordered a gallon of Trick Shift from Summit Racing. I advised our member to wait on driving the car until the supercharger is cleaned out and fresh new fluid put in.

                  Learned a trick from Bill Eastburn. He said put a small plastic tube in the dipstick port, run that to a glass jar with a home punched into the lid, the punch another hole in the lid and hook up to a vacuum cleaner. It will suck all the stuff out and the glass jar will not collapse like a plastic jar.

                  Bob Miles
                  Spinning, not free wheeling
                  Take the S/C belt off and he can drive the car.
                  Refer to my post no. 2.
                  Gary L.
                  Wappinger, NY

                  SDC member since 1968
                  Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                  Comment

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