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  • Other: Reconditioned old batteries

    Anyone have a process on reconditioning old batteries. I have old 6 and 8 volt batteries. Thanks in advance.

  • #2
    I've never had good luck when trying to recondition an old battery. Usually what happens to them is the plates get badly sulfated or so much of the plate material collects in the bottom of the cell that the cell shorts out making the battery unuseable. Bud

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    • #3
      I do not think that "reconditioned" batteries last very long. With the price of new batteries, I just buy new (usually WalMart).
      Most recently, I have been converting to AGM ("dry") batteries.
      For battery cores, I have been bringing them to AutoZone where you get a $10 store credit for them.
      Gary L.
      Wappinger, NY

      SDC member since 1968
      Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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      • #4
        I just bought some new batteries. The 6 volt heavy duty group 1 was $96 plus tax. While cleaning out the glove compartment, I found receipts for batteries for $40. How things have changed.

        There used to be a chemical called VX-6 which claimed to recondition batteries. I had good luck with one battery. That might work on sulphated batteries, but not on the ones with particles in the bottom of the case shorting out the cells.

        In the old daze, the auto parts companies used to remove bad individual cells and replace them with good cells from other used batteries. They would sell them as reconditioned batteries. They lasted long enough to sell the car, maybe.
        RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

        17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
        10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
        10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
        4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
        5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
        56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
        60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

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        • #5
          Originally posted by RadioRoy View Post
          There used to be a chemical called VX-6 which claimed to recondition batteries.
          I was going to mention VX-6 too, Roy, but you beat me to it. Lee Petty was on the VX-6 boxes and in their advertisements.
          Click image for larger version

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          Paul
          Winston-Salem, NC
          Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

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          • #6
            Usually the Batteries need to be ONLY 4 or 5 Years past the Sold/Mfg. Date, always on the Round Sticker on the Side (End) of the Battery to "Save" them. The process is: flushing out the Electrolyte and replacing with Fresh Sulfuric Acid and Distilled Water a very DANGEROUS process, cover your Eyes!

            I use a Safer method; I go to a Local Used Tire and Battery Shop and get the New Interstate and Other Brands Scratch and Dents, which are probably marked "Blem" due to Mfg. Date or Minor Scratch, Nick or Gouge. They are 35-$45.00 and Guaranteed about 6 Months, exchanged/replaced.

            https://beaconbatteries.com/bio

            You can't Fed-X one of these, so if you don't live close... Sorry!
            Last edited by StudeRich; 06-17-2021, 01:07 PM.
            StudeRich
            Second Generation Stude Driver,
            Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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            • #7
              On another battery note, a buddy just mentioned this battery trick to me the other day, wondering if it has ant truth to it? To eliminate corrosion on the terminals for deep cycle battery's with the studs, take an old penny and drill a 1/4" hole through it and use it like a "washer". Does the copper in the penny really work?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Mark Plucenik View Post
                On another battery note, a buddy just mentioned this battery trick to me the other day, wondering if it has ant truth to it? To eliminate corrosion on the terminals for deep cycle battery's with the studs, take an old penny and drill a 1/4" hole through it and use it like a "washer". Does the copper in the penny really work?
                You might want to use a pre-1982 penny to get a copper one. U.S. pennies changed over from copper to zinc (with a copper plating) in 1982. Pennies before 1982 are copper (alloy); those 1983 and later are 97.5% zinc with a copper plating. 1982 pennies can be either copper or zinc. Take a 1983 or newer penny and cut it in two with tin snips and the difference will be obvious. Dropping them on a hard counter will also reveal the difference: ring with copper, thud with zinc.

                The change was made because the cost of copper greatly exceeded the face value of the coin.
                -Dwight

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                • #9
                  May not be relevant, but one of the chargers I have, a Stanley, has a battery recondition cycle. I have used it successfully on the battery for my gas powered Arien's mower and for the battery on my gas powered golf cart. Both batteries were completely dead and would not hold a charge. After the recondition cycle, both batteries seem to be ok. Do not know about long term and have not tried it on automotive batteries.
                  78 Avanti RQB 2792
                  64 Avanti R1 R5408
                  63 Avanti R1 R4551
                  63 Avanti R1 R2281
                  62 GT Hawk V15949
                  56 GH 6032504
                  56 GH 6032588
                  55 Speedster 7160047
                  55 Speedster 7165279

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                  • #10
                    Back in my poor college days, I used "Bummer" Batteries in lovely May-retta Georgia. Most would call it Bomber Batteries in Marietta, but it's Jaw-ja.
                    Anyway, they had their start building batteries for the B-29, and possibly later for the C-130's and C-141's ( I don't know for sure) but by the mid '70's had at least a sideline of remanufacturing auto batteries. Basically, they dumped the acid, washed the case out, and installed new acid. AFAIR, a 24F was $10, and they lasted a year or so.
                    Ron Dame
                    '63 Champ

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                    • #11
                      A 24F is is for Fords and has Backwards Posts for a Stude. you want the Group 24 with the Negative Post Forward and Inboard.

                      A Safe Hood Clearance and correct Cable Length are the Main reasons for using a Correct Group Size Battery, same as Most MoPars and many others.
                      StudeRich
                      Second Generation Stude Driver,
                      Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
                        A 24F is is for Fords and has Backwards Posts for a Stude. you want the Group 24 with the Negative Post Forward and Inboard.

                        A Safe Hood Clearance and correct Cable Length are the Main reasons for using a Correct Group Size Battery, same as Most MoPars and many others.
                        Well, I didn't have a Stude back then...so 24F WAS correct.
                        Ron Dame
                        '63 Champ

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                        • #13
                          I remember seeing bottles/jars of fresh battery acid for sale in the "hard parts"-type of auto stores back in the 70's. That must have lead to some interesting stories. Was that really fifty years ago? I am so ancient.

                          By "hard parts" I mean the type of stores that professional mechanics went to for parts, not the highly advertised in the newspaper and radio stores that the great unwashed masses generally use to buy oil and wax.
                          Last edited by RadioRoy; 06-18-2021, 04:12 PM.
                          RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

                          17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
                          10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
                          10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
                          4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
                          5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
                          56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
                          60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            RadioRoy, I'll bet that even parts stores like NAPA or Carquest don't stock battery acid as it is probably illegal to sell just like good carburetor parts dip. Bud

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                            • #15
                              There are plenty of YouTube videos on how to recondition batteries. I think the only reason I would take on a project like that is if I had the actual, original battery for a car and wanted that to be part of the restoration. Otherwise I'm willing to buy new batteries every few years and turn in the cores for recycling. I have zero interest in being stuck somewhere waiting for a jump.

                              https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...dition+battery

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