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  • #16
    quote:
    I'm trying to imagine how tough it would be to network for parts (especially for a newbie) without the internet.
    Easy, business cards, TW catalog listings, Stephen Allen listings, vendor table paper listings, SI(Oops Packard Farm) catalogs, and who could forget the N&A big books of Studebaker parts numbers. I recall having to list what was needed(still do today) through the Studebaker numbers, and going to the front desk to see what was in stock. Them numbers helped me not only with N&A, but also present day SI, Stephen Allen, and whoever used the numbering system to locate parts. It also pays to know who would have what, for instance, Myer, Harbit,and T-Bow, would have high performance stuff. If I needed a SC widget, the odds were pretty likely they would have one on the table at the next meet. If not, but they're was a supply back home, I could place an order and in a couple weeks it would arrive at my doorstep. It's probably common knowledge to do this stuff now, but as they say "I get by [)]".....

    The bigger pain in the rear was some of the items reproduced now, were not reproduced then. I remember our 55 and trying to locate that Loma Gray? wiper knob, I thought there was going to be no end to that ghastly search.

    I would commend the Internet has become a rather large tool in the information toolbox. There was items I never knew existed prior to this little device, even items I never knew that were being manufactured, which can be a double edged sword. For instance, forced induction systems, I practically picked up that whole concept from reading website after website of material until I could learn how to build one of my own.

    [img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/My%201950%202r5%20Studebaker%20Pickup%20with%20turbocharger/P1000137-1.jpg[/img=left][img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/My%201950%202r5%20Studebaker%20Pickup%20with%20turbocharger/P1000145-1.jpg[/img=left][IMG=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/Ex%20Studebaker%20Plant%20Locomotive/P1000578-1.jpg[/IMG=right]
    [IMG=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/My%201964%20Studebaker%20Commander%20R2/P1010168.jpg[/IMG=right]

    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

    Comment


    • #17
      quote:Originally posted by 1962larksedan

      Why I wonder is despite Stude cars being rather unpopular when new from the mid 1950's onwards outside of the 1959 Lark----------there seem to be quite a few survivors out there.

      -------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

      "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"
      I've mentioned this on this website before, but in my hometown Studes, at least near the end, were owned by older folks by a notably wider margin than other makes of cars. Older folks tend to drive fewer miles, then pass on, and the cars sold by kids/grandkids.

      Bill Pressler
      Kent, OH
      '63 Lark Daytona Skytop R1
      Bill Pressler
      Kent, OH
      (formerly Greenville, PA)
      Currently owned: 1966 Cruiser, Timberline Turquoise, 26K miles
      Formerly owned: 1963 Lark Daytona Skytop R1, Ermine White
      1964 Daytona Hardtop, Strato Blue
      1966 Daytona Sports Sedan, Niagara Blue Mist
      All are in Australia now

      Comment


      • #18
        The internet is one of the best things ever for old cars for the already stated reasons. One of the best things is for those of us whose hobby money comes in an unpredictable way. It would be hard for me to draw up a list of what I need and save all the money for the couple meets per year I attend- and even then the odds of it all being there aren't that high. With the 'net, especially eBay, I can look for and buy what I need 24hrs./365 days; a great help for me with the hours I work... and little by little, as finances permit.

        Almost perfect setup- just two flaws: One is, you frequently don't know the seller, so there's some risk; but I've found that to be exceedingly small; and eBay and PayPal have protected me when there was a problem; so that's not a big issue.

        The real flaw is the detrimental effect on the swap meets. I purposely plan to (and do) buy several items at every meet- because I try to keep them alive. Not because they're the only source anymore, but simply because I love rooting through parts and talking to people. A big problem with that format is, I still am not able to easily identify most Stude parts. I know that every meet I miss out on something I really needed because I didn't recognize it.

        Which brings me back to the 'net, and eBay. It's an ongoing quandry, wth no easy answers. I sure hope York and Reedsville continue on and prosper; and that the much-better way of doing business- the internet- leaves room for them to survive.

        Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
        Parish, central NY 13131

        "Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

        "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"



        Comment


        • #19
          I don't see swap meets taking a major hit because of the internet. Swap meets still offer the advantage of being able to see what you're buying instead of relying on a few pictures. Also, if you're looking for sheet metal or heavy parts, the savings on shipping will be huge. IMO, the internet (and ebay) brings people into the hobby that normally wouldn't have the time or ability to attend swap meets due to their location.

          Chuck/Ohio 9G-C5

          Comment


          • #20
            Most modern car dealers do not stock spare parts.
            The manufacturers have parts warehouses and dispatch parts to the dealers as needed.
            Studebaker required dealers to stock basic parts and had regional dealers that stocked less used parts.
            There was no FEDEX and Railway Express was the fastest way to ship.
            I have bought 28 Studebaker dealerships over the years as a retirement project.
            Some of these dealers yielded several truck loads of parts.
            I now have a 38.000 sq,ft building and it is getting crowded.
            I hope to go to York this year. I noticed last time that the number of vendors is dwindling.
            Bob


            Comment


            • #21
              Have to disagree with the 'net not having a impact on the hobby.
              It has a huge impact.Most vendors with any savvy at all are
              leaving the choice parts at home to sell to a worldwide market
              and bringing the weak sister parts to the swap.If I have a part
              that is worth $300 I can take it to the swap,pay for spaces,chew
              up time and fuel,get my $300 and go home.OR...I can sit at my
              computer and offer it to the world and if a bidding war happens
              and I make more than my $300 reserve... yippee!!
              This applies to both multi make swaps such as Carlisle and Iola
              and Studebaker only swaps.
              I will vend at Cedar Rapids this year but after 35 years of hauling
              parts all over the country I now only go to find underpriced parts
              to sell on the 'net.Vendors are dropping like flies at small/medium
              swaps.Travel costs are huge.Sitting at home is cost effective.
              Mono mind in a stereo world

              Comment


              • #22
                quote:Originally posted by bob40

                Have to disagree with the 'net not having a impact on the hobby.
                It has a huge impact.Most vendors with any savvy at all are
                leaving the choice parts at home to sell to a worldwide market
                and bringing the weak sister parts to the swap.If I have a part
                that is worth $300 I can take it to the swap,pay for spaces,chew
                up time and fuel,get my $300 and go home.OR...I can sit at my
                computer and offer it to the world and if a bidding war happens
                and I make more than my $300 reserve... yippee!!
                This applies to both multi make swaps such as Carlisle and Iola
                and Studebaker only swaps.
                I will vend at Cedar Rapids this year but after 35 years of hauling
                parts all over the country I now only go to find underpriced parts
                to sell on the 'net.Vendors are dropping like flies at small/medium
                swaps.Travel costs are huge.Sitting at home is cost effective.
                And I understand your thoughts as well.

                Between UPS, Fedex, etc. coupled with the Internet there is little reason to schlep a bunch of especially bulky/heavy parts around from swap meet to swap meet.

                Admittedly; I do live in Arizona where rustfree cars do pop up from time to time locally.

                EDIT:

                The above stated: going as a vendor to a big Stude show does make sense IMHO--------especially if said show is less than 100 miles away

                -------------------------------------------------------------------------
                Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

                "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"
                --------------------------------------

                Sold my 1962; Studeless at the moment

                Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

                "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

                Comment


                • #23
                  I understand that the internet is huge for the hobby, but I rely more on the swap meets. I usually plan (and save) for as many meets as I can. Shipping on seats, body parts, drivetrain, etc. is big time and a lot of sellers don't want the hassle and go with the "pick up only" route. Also, they give an idea of what the market is for parts you plan on buying in the future. They also give an opportunity to meet some good people and make future contacts.

                  Chuck/Ohio 9G-C5

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    I should add I'll do what I do usually in the event if I need something important, or if its broken. It's usually like "oh its part so and so with so and so number stamped on the end of it. I'll add the number to the list and take it with me to the meet, along with the "wishlist items" I don't need at a moments notice, but just in case I see. If possible I'll toss the part in my pocket and match the part to one thats on the table on the meet(The old toss the broken bulb in the pocket routine). Yeah, vendors can go either way with parts quality. From years of experience, the feelings mtual with a vendor. If I like the part, I'll keep workin with em. If I get sorry quality from a product when expectations were high, I never wanna hear from em again. It's not just Studebaker meets, it goes for regular meets, computer shows, hamfests, train shows(ours keeps a test track for this type of product, go figure, lol), as well as Ebay, online outlets, and etcetera, although I very very rarely work with Ebay these days.
                    Anyway, once the priorities are out of the way, and I have what I came for, then I like to go through parts bins. I like picking up surplus items(bulbs, T-fittings, fasteners, etc) because Lord knows one day a project or a call for a replacement will come along that will call for something like that. If I have a running project(such as the JTS block) I will also pickup one more part to complete the puzzle. I mean I'd love to save the vendor as well, but usually it's a small budget. If anything, ol' Ben Franklin's philosophy is usually in play at the meet- A penny saved is a penny earned

                    [img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/My%201950%202r5%20Studebaker%20Pickup%20with%20turbocharger/P1000137-1.jpg[/img=left][img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/My%201950%202r5%20Studebaker%20Pickup%20with%20turbocharger/P1000145-1.jpg[/img=left][IMG=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/Ex%20Studebaker%20Plant%20Locomotive/P1000578-1.jpg[/IMG=right]
                    [IMG=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/My%201964%20Studebaker%20Commander%20R2/P1010168.jpg[/IMG=right]

                    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
                    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
                    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
                    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

                    Comment

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