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Bushing replacement cost ??

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  • Front Axle / Front Suspension: Bushing replacement cost ??

    Be it far from me to know what is going on in shops with Covid, inflation, etc....... To the point: what is the going rate for front A-arm bushing replacement in a 60's Lark (Hawk) ?? What state ?

  • #2
    If you were near me, I'd probably help you do the job just for the heck of it. As for paying a shop, my guess, if you can even find someone competent, maybe $300-$500 for the labor. Parts extra. Also, be aware of mission creep; 'while it's apart, might as well...'

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    • #3
      That is correct, it STARTS with Inner "A" Arm Rubber and Steel Bushings that are always shot, BUT then maybe the Upper Outer Pins are worn, how about the Lowers?

      Then the King Pin Bearings and Bushings and maybe King Pins. Oh yeah, there are the Center Pivot Bearings, Tie Rod Ends and jounce Bumpers.

      A Wheel Alignment Shop in business a while, that does Trucks will have a clue. Possibly between $2000.00 & $3,000.00 Total. Which is why most Classic Car owners do it themselves.
      StudeRich
      Second Generation Stude Driver,
      Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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      • #4
        Assuming that the vehicle has been properly maintained lube-wise, the upper rubber bushings fail first since this "A" arm is shorter and subject to more torsional strain than does the lower much longer arm...

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        • #5
          Most modern repair shops won't touch one. Most front end alignment shops haven't a clue, either. Some try to do it on their own and usually bend things, because they don't have the correct tools to do the job. A very few have the tools and can do the job. Some are smart enough to know they can't, fore if it were easy to do, everyone would be doing it.

          The above said, I agree with what Rich pointed out.

          I think Joe nailed it about the competence issue, but I think he is a bit off on the labor costs, unless he's thinking the owner takes the arms off and delivers them to the shop to have the bushings pressed out and the new pressed in.

          Otherwise, your paying for shop space, use of a lift, electricity, environmental impact fees, misc. shop supplies, mid morning break, lunch break, afternoon break, federal, state and local taxes, mechanical ability, know how and willingness to touch one, all of which is wrapped up in that $85.00 to $125.00 per hour shop labor rate.

          Bo
          Last edited by Bo Markham; 05-31-2021, 05:06 AM.

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          • #6
            In the Honda Gold Wing world, there's a guy with a huge truck & trailer who shows up at larger meets all over the nation. He has 2-3 helpers, and stocks a lotta common use items on his trailer. He is always super busy, and says he has more business than he can keep up with. I have often wondered if that would be a good idea in the Studebaker world. There are many folks out there trying to make do with their Studebakers, as is, neglecting rudimentary maintenance tasks because they are unable, or cannot find anyone who is competent and available. This also probably affects a person's decision whether to even try to own and operate a Studebaker. Sometimes I feel almost guilty for not stepping up to the plate, but wish someone else would. Perhaps someone younger, with a lot more energy.

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            • #7
              Great idea Joe. There's a desperate need for competent Stude/Old car mechanics. Here in Tucson there is a few mobile mechanics popping up. Why not old car mobile mechanics. Would definitely have to service the more populated areas of the country.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by VIRGILX View Post
                Great idea Joe. There's a desperate need for competent Stude/Old car mechanics. Here in Tucson there is a few mobile mechanics popping up. Why not old car mobile mechanics. Would definitely have to service the more populated areas of the country.
                Duane,

                He has to come to my house first, then he can go to your and Corey's house. There is a great crackerjack Studebaker Mechanic but is one hour east of Tucson. He will guide you in the work so you can learn what needs to be done to keep the Studebaker running driving and stopping.

                Bob Miles

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