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Stude/Mopar Hydraulic Lifter Conversion

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  • Engine: Stude/Mopar Hydraulic Lifter Conversion

    I know there is some knowledge of this out there as I mentioned it once before. The previous owner converted my 62 GT 289 to hydraulic lifters for unknown reasons! The car also has a Mopar electronic ignition conversion that may or may not be from Dave Thibeault. I tried a new cap which Dave said should fit and it didn't so I'm not really sure what distributor is on this car!

    The distributor is worn and I am considering a Delco or MSD style distributor but I am concerned what cam might be in this car and whether the cam/dist gear might be something different and therefore would prohibit Delco/MSD distributors.

    Is anyone familiar with this hyd lifter conversion? Did they use a standard 289 cam or something different?

    Thanks


  • #2
    I would assume they used a Studebaker cam core reground to a profile suited to hydraulic lifters. It was pretty easy to put the Mopar electronic guts into a Studebaker Prestolite distributor. Back in the days when Mopars equipped with the early type electronic ignition were thick on the ground at the U-Pull-its, it was a cheap and easy conversion.
    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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    • #3
      Originally posted by gordr View Post
      I would assume they used a Studebaker cam core reground to a profile suited to hydraulic lifters. It was pretty easy to put the Mopar electronic guts into a Studebaker Prestolite distributor. Back in the days when Mopars equipped with the early type electronic ignition were thick on the ground at the U-Pull-its, it was a cheap and easy conversion.
      Yes, you are absolutely right. Dave Thibeault got back to me with this:

      "Many years ago Lionel Stone made some hydraulic lifter conversions for some reason. They used Mopar lifters on a reground cam that was made to a 326 Pontiac grind. and used Chevrolet 6250 cu-in push rods. I sold many of them and they worked ok. The distributor will still work as it it is a Studebaker cam that is reground."

      So, I can indeed still use a Delco distributor if I choose to go that route.

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      • #4
        As gordr says, the lobe shape is different between a solid and a hydraulic. While "some" solid profiles "may" work with hydraulic lifters, I've never seen or heard of any. Stude 289 or any other. The ramps are different.

        So, whomever did the conversion in your engine, had a hydraulic cam profile lobes ground onto the Stude cam.

        Note, that using roller lifters, solid and hydraulic lobe shapes can be used interchangeably.

        Mike

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Kato View Post

          Yes, you are absolutely right. Dave Thibeault got back to me with this:

          "Many years ago Lionel Stone made some hydraulic lifter conversions for some reason. They used Mopar lifters on a reground cam that was made to a 326 Pontiac grind. and used Chevrolet 6250 cu-in push rods. I sold many of them and they worked ok. The distributor will still work as it it is a Studebaker cam that is reground."

          So, I can indeed still use a Delco distributor if I choose to go that route.
          Um...I seriously doubt that Chevrolet or anyone else ever made a 6250 cubic inch automobile engine..!

          Mike

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          • #6
            Reading between the lines, I believe that is a reference to the 250 inline 6.
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            • #7
              Originally posted by Mike Van Veghten View Post

              Um...I seriously doubt that Chevrolet or anyone else ever made a 6250 cubic inch automobile engine..!

              Mike
              Yeah, not sure what engine he was referring to but we get the point!

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              • #8
                Details are...everything..!
                Without them, we'd still be on horses.

                Mike

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                • #9
                  Odd fact, whenever i have a cam reground to hotter specs the lifter diameter seems to be key and a mopar grind is recommended. current cam is 270 degrees duration .468 lift and works quite well. Chet Herbert, Lunati, and Comp Cams have all ground cams for different "Project's" and all used the lifter diameter as key to grind selection. Luck Doofus

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by doofus View Post
                    Odd fact, whenever i have a cam reground to hotter specs the lifter diameter seems to be key and a mopar grind is recommended. current cam is 270 degrees duration .468 lift and works quite well. Chet Herbert, Lunati, and Comp Cams have all ground cams for different "Project's" and all used the lifter diameter as key to grind selection. Luck Doofus
                    Just geometry. The larger the lifter diameter, the more aggressive the ramp angles can be used and thus greater area under the lift curve.

                    FWIW, the Studebaker V8 has a very small cam core diameter and small lobes. This limits the choices within the Mopar cam profile family. There are some very strong later "high-intensity" profiles which won't fit on the Studebaker lobes; can't grind air.

                    If one wants the latest/greatest cam profiles for a Studebaker project, it's necessary to use a steel billet roller cam and lifters and custom pushrods and custom valve springs. Figure about $2500 to do it right.

                    jack vines
                    PackardV8

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