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1950 Champion Studebaker - Clutch

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  • NCDave51
    replied
    Originally posted by Ron Dame View Post

    Be certain to use GL-1, also known as Ford Tractor oil, if using a mineral/non synthetic oil. It's available at Tractor Supply, NAPA, and other sources. Ratings other than that have compounds that can damage the synchros and overdrive springs.
    You will find it handy to get a pump to fill the transmission, and yes, the overdrive must be filled separately from the main gearbox.
    This handy device has been a lifesaver for tight spots - and the fill ports on a B-W gearbox are good examples!

    Leave a comment:


  • rkapteyn
    replied
    Sorry , wrong part numbers.
    I will find the correct numbers for yo

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  • rkapteyn
    replied
    Check your parts book.There were early and later improve versions 519303 for early 1950 Champion and 527871 for later cars.
    Both are available from my favorite vendor
    Studebakerparts on line
    http://www.studebakerparts.com

    Leave a comment:


  • rkapteyn
    replied
    On several Studebakers of the fifties I found that the two cams inside the bell housing on the clutch release shaft got loose because all that attaches these to the clutch release is a press fit onto a serrated section of the shaft.
    Find a new shaft or spot weld the to the shaft.
    The problem is where to weld them in relation to the shaft.
    I will see tomorrow if I still have any new ones of these shafts in stock.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ron Dame
    replied
    Originally posted by 64studeavanti View Post
    Yes, there should be a drain plug on the transmission and the O/D. There are fill plugs as well. You should get a shop manual to ensure you fill correctly. IIRC, you fill the O/D first. Loosely insert fill plug. Then fill trans.
    Be certain to use GL-1, also known as Ford Tractor oil, if using a mineral/non synthetic oil. It's available at Tractor Supply, NAPA, and other sources. Ratings other than that have compounds that can damage the synchros and overdrive springs.
    You will find it handy to get a pump to fill the transmission, and yes, the overdrive must be filled separately from the main gearbox.

    Leave a comment:


  • 64studeavanti
    replied
    Yes, there should be a drain plug on the transmission and the O/D. There are fill plugs as well. You should get a shop manual to ensure you fill correctly. IIRC, you fill the O/D first. Loosely insert fill plug. Then fill trans.

    Leave a comment:


  • stewie
    replied
    Ok, thank you, I do have the O/D. So you're saying there is 2 plugs that need draining, correct?

    Leave a comment:


  • 64studeavanti
    replied
    The drain plug is on the transmission and another if you have O/D. There is no drain plug on the flywheel as there would be on the Torque converter for automatic. Manual transmissions have no filter. I like using Red Line MT 90.

    Leave a comment:


  • stewie
    replied
    Gordr, thank you for the info. Using the correct terminology the clutch is engaged. To add I should change the transmission fluid. If I understand this correctly, the drain plug is on the flywheel and I just need to line up the flywheel so the drain plug is facing down for the oil to drain out. Does that sound right? What type of transmission fluid should I use and is there any type of filter I need to change?

    Take care,
    Mark

    Leave a comment:


  • gordr
    replied
    Originally posted by stewie View Post
    Hey All, thank you all for you advise and support. We did get get it jacked up and crawled under it to get a better look. Mechanically the clutch looks like it's doing what it's supposed to do. We push it down and it seems to be working. We haven't driven it in about a year. We do have it in a heated garage and start it periodically over the winter. We don't take it out from about October through April. Wisconsin winters are not kind with all the salt an calcium that's put down.

    Should we try freeing the clutch from the flyweel? Just to clarify, when we start the car, push the clutch down and try to put it in gear it just grinds.

    Thank you again for all your help -
    Mark
    OK, let's get the terminology straight! Your clutch seems to remain engaged even when the pedal is depressed. Clutch "engaged" means it is able to transmit torque from the engine to the driveline. That is your normal driving state. Clutch "disengaged (also "released")" means the engine can turn freely without moving the car.

    Moving on, what is the problem then? You cannot shift into first gear when you depress the clutch pedal. Like Ron says, the clutch disc may be stuck to the flywheel or pressure plate by rust, or maybe even gummy oil leaked in there over the years. His solution should work in that case. If the car was working normally when it was parked for storage, it's a good bet that is the cause, too. You also might have just a little drag on the clutch when the pedal is depressed, or the transmission input shaft may simply be spinning freely after the clutch is depressed, and causes a grind, even though the engine is no longer driving it. I have cars that tend to do that. One trick you can try is to attempt to shift from neutral into second gear. If the input shaft is just free-spinning, the second gear synchronizer will brake it to a halt, and it will then easily go into second. Then you quickly shift to first, and drive off. You probably should check the amount and quality of the oil in the transmission in this case.

    If the clutch linkage is actually broken, or badly out of adjustment, the pedal won't feel right; most of the pedal stroke will be wasted just taking up slack in the linkage, and there is not enough travel left to fully operate the pressure plate. There should be an inch or so of "free travel" at the top of the pedal stroke, during which the only resistance you feel is that of the pedal return spring. Once the free travel is taken up, you should feel the effort to move it increase steadily as you press the pedal further. If the clutch pedal goes easily right to the floor when you press on it, then there is probably a broken clevis pin, as suggested by Roy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ron Dame
    replied
    Yes try that. roll it to a safe place. Engine off, put it in gear. Clutch to the floor, brakes on, start the car. If it does not break free, then drive up to about 10 MPH, clutch pedal on the floor, and hit the brakes hard. That usually will do the trick.

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  • stewie
    replied
    Hey All, thank you all for you advise and support. We did get get it jacked up and crawled under it to get a better look. Mechanically the clutch looks like it's doing what it's supposed to do. We push it down and it seems to be working. We haven't driven it in about a year. We do have it in a heated garage and start it periodically over the winter. We don't take it out from about October through April. Wisconsin winters are not kind with all the salt an calcium that's put down.

    Should we try freeing the clutch from the flyweel? Just to clarify, when we start the car, push the clutch down and try to put it in gear it just grinds.

    Thank you again for all your help -
    Mark

    Leave a comment:


  • RadioRoy
    replied
    Often the Champion engine will use a Fram C-3 filter. The C-4 filter was used on the Commander engines.

    Leave a comment:


  • rockne10
    replied
    Until you've had some run time and determined the condition of the engine, oil blow by and pressure, etc, it's hard to go wrong with initially using Shell Rotella-T 15w40 designed for diesel engines; then stick with that or adjust as experience dictates.

    Assuming it has a factory or dealer installed oil filter it should be a Fram type C4. Click image for larger version  Name:	fram C4.jpg Views:	0 Size:	18.6 KB ID:	1892495

    Fram filters have been falling out of favor, as other brands have eclipsed their quality.
    Here's a listing of alternatives for the replacement cartridge.

    https://www.oilfilter-crossreference...onvert/Fram/C4

    Leave a comment:


  • RadioRoy
    replied
    I have owned two 1950 Champions over the years. I got them both for cheap money because the clutch would not disengage.

    Same trouble both times - broken clevis pin on the linkage going into the bell housing. The pins can break, but the ends stay in place, so it looks like the pin is OK. Also, as Rich already said, that collar that the pins go into can have its holes torn.

    There is a Zerk fitting on the clutch housing that never gets greased. You should grease it.

    This is shown in the chassis parts catalog, which all the Studebaker vendors have, and is an invaluable tool. You should get the three books;
    -chassis parts catalog,
    -body parts catalog,
    -and shop manual.
    Last edited by RadioRoy; 05-01-2021, 08:42 AM.

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