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  • Steering: 53' C-cab steering change

    Hey guys,

    New to the forum with the purchase of a 53' 2R5. The truck has been swapped to a Chevy 350 with turbo 400 tranny. Good ride but the steering is original yet semi-updated to PS. This truck was a purchase for my 78 year old father who is struggling with the turning radius and oversized/original steering wheel + play in the wheel. I think that the smaller steering wheel conversion alone may help but looking for ideas here.

    Thanks,

    Mike

  • #2
    How does one "semi-update" to power steering? There was no power steering option for a 2R5, ever. Without knowing how your truck was converted to power steering, there is no way to know what might make it steer better. Usually, a smaller steering wheel makes steering problems worse, especially if there is slop in the system. If you could take some photos and add them to the thread, it might be of immense help.
    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

    Comment


    • #3
      Any Idea WHAT Power Steering Gear is In there?
      It is not a Rack and Pinion is it?

      "Some" of these Conversions have been found to never reach the full Lock to Lock Spindle/King Pin STOPS.
      Last edited by StudeRich; 04-27-2021, 01:18 PM.
      StudeRich
      Second Generation Stude Driver,
      Proud '54 Starliner Owner

      Comment


      • #4
        Also, does it have radial tires or bias ply tires? It will steer MUCH MUCH easier with the original size bias ply tires.

        But as Rich and gordr said, we really need to know what was "updated" (screwed up??) as far as the steering.
        Paul
        Winston-Salem, NC
        Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Mgriess908 View Post
          Hey guys,

          New to the forum with the purchase of a 53' 2R5. The truck has been swapped to a Chevy 350 with turbo 400 tranny. Good ride but the steering is original yet semi-updated to PS. This truck was a purchase for my 78 year old father who is struggling with the turning radius and oversized/original steering wheel + play in the wheel. I think that the smaller steering wheel conversion alone may help but looking for ideas here.

          Thanks,

          Mike
          But as Rich and gordr said, we really need to know what was "updated" (screwed up??) as far as the steering.
          For true. There are two problems here; the result of a semi-PS-update. A professionally done PS conversion will allow the wheel to turn with little effort, regardless of the size of the steering wheel. It will also have the same turning radius as the original truck.

          jack vines


          PackardV8

          Comment


          • #6
            Here is one alternative.

            https://epasperformance.com/products/studebaker

            (copy)
            INCLUDED IN KIT:


            60 amp electric motor unit
            Mounting hardware
            Prewired control module
            NOTES:


            Features a low 9 amp draw
            Average install time of 8 hours
            Requires some cutting
            Steering wheel not included


            HOW IT WORKS:


            The computer measures the amount of effort on the steering wheel and amplifies it with the aid of the electric motor. A potentiometer gives you control over the amount of assistance provided, allowing you to fine tune your EPAS experience. For example, you can have maximum power assist while on a parking lot, and less on the highway. The system is only active while turning.



            Attached Files
            HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

            Jeff


            Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



            Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

            Comment


            • #7
              I've never installed an EPAS in a C-cab, but there are some considerations beyond just cutting and putting it in series in the steering column.

              I've driven C-cabs for more than sixty years and in my younger days was strong enough to turn the steering wheel, even with radial tires installed. However, I soon learned never to apply too much force. My grandfather and my father both taught me to always have a bit of forward or rearward movement before starting to turn the wheel. The stock Studebaker steering gear and frame mounting area simply aren't strong enough to absorb and transmit the forces if the truck is stationary. A determined driver can destroy a steering gearbox and fatigue the frame just by continued cranking on it enough times. He'd be aware of the effort expended, but with an EPAS installed, he wouldn't.

              From experience, when a hydraulic PS is installed, the modern PS gearbox is engineered for the forces and the Studebaker frame must be reinforced with a welded-in thick steel mounting plate and the K-member must be welded to the side frame rails.

              Your opinions and results may vary.

              jack vines
              PackardV8

              Comment


              • #8
                Am in the process of installing an Epas in John's Transtar.
                I'll let y'all know how it goes...
                HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                Jeff


                Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Ironically I was junkyard hunting for PS alternatives today for my '59 4E7. With a T85 column shift I'm afraid options are limited, does anyone have a floor shifter option for a T85 OD?... Plus- Most PS boxes are big enough that I'm worried about clearance to the v8 exhaust manifold,
                  I found an Isuzu Trooper II with a standard power box that might be usable dimensionally, if I can figure out how to fix the outer tube in place AND support the column...
                  I also found a couple Chevy Cobalts with electric assist setups similar to the one Jeff links to above. I may go back for that after doing some research (including the forum check I'm doing now lol). I'd probably have to modify the shift tube to get around it.
                  One thing that strikes me as odd is that the one Jeff is using appears to react all of the torque thru the outer steering tube, nothing else. The Cobalt unit mounts to an underdash bracket...
                  Engine is out and doghouse off, this could be a good time to make the mod, but I'm already about 70 days into the original 15 day project so I think I'll do it later. My arms are still strong.
                  Jeff please keep us posted. if anyone has a hot tip here, I'm all ears.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by retrostude View Post
                    With a T85 column shift I'm afraid options are limited, does anyone have a floor shifter option for a T85 OD?
                    Most of the kits for cars position the shifter so far to the rear the shifter handle hits the bench seat. I've made brackets to mount a Hurst shifter to the T89 so the handle is in the same position as the T98 4-speed. It's much easier to do with the transmission on the bench.

                    Originally posted by retrostude View Post
                    Plus- Most PS boxes are big enough that I'm worried about clearance to the v8 exhaust manifold,
                    The last generation of GM big rear drive cars have a PS box which can be adapted to the C-cab. The bracket to do so is a complicated bit of fab work, but not beyond most builders.

                    jack vines

                    PackardV8

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Funny, I have no trouble steering my '50 Ross gearbox.... it's a bit sloppy, but ok.
                      I just remember that no steering effort can be made until I'm moving.

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