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  • Kato
    replied
    Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post

    FWIW, back when, I had two business trips a year to Hawaii, visiting all four islands. I soon learned the most convenient inter-island transit was on the commuter lines; single turboprop 9-passenger Cessna Grand Caravan. When I'd suggest this to others or tell about the benefits, there was unanimous recoil in horror; "You fly over the ocean in a single-engine plane? Never, ever gonna try that!"

    Click image for larger version

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    jack vines
    At least the Caravan is a turbine with far less chance of failure but yeah, it still is only one engine! I fly the B777 and when we fly to Asia we are often on polar routes that can have us as long as 3 1/2 hours from any usable airport. That would be a long time on one engine in such a remote part of the world should one engine fail!

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  • Kato
    replied
    Originally posted by jackb View Post
    I had a valve sticking when I 1st got a 259 from sitting 15 years. Black smoke and tailpipe residue (single tail), ticking when idling (occasionally, and now after a long hot drive)..... Found 1 spark plug all black.
    I have wondered about something like that as well. I'm going to do a compression test.

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  • Ron Dame
    replied
    Originally posted by jackb View Post
    I had a valve sticking when I 1st got a 259 from sitting 15 years. Black smoke and tailpipe residue (single tail), ticking when idling (occasionally, and now after a long hot drive)..... Found 1 spark plug all black.
    Thanks Jack, I was starting to think maybe we all ought to install a second engine in out cars, in case one flames out!

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  • j.byrd
    replied
    PackardV8, Mokulele Airlines still uses these planes. Wonderful old things, and they glide well too in case "Number 1" flames out, ha ! My wife has flown back and forth to the other islands many times from here at Kona International (KOA) and loves it ! No TSA, no lines, Click image for larger version

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ID:	1892425 take your food & drink with you, just you with your bags get weighed, and off ya' go !

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  • PackardV8
    replied
    Originally posted by Kato View Post

    LOL.. that is all so true. It's almost like we expect there to something wrong so we don't stop looking until we find it! I am a long time pilot and the "auto rough" analogy is very true. These days I spend hours and hours over the Pacific Ocean and those early days feelings when in single engine machines never quite go away .. LOL
    FWIW, back when, I had two business trips a year to Hawaii, visiting all four islands. I soon learned the most convenient inter-island transit was on the commuter lines; single turboprop 9-passenger Cessna Grand Caravan. When I'd suggest this to others or tell about the benefits, there was unanimous recoil in horror; "You fly over the ocean in a single-engine plane? Never, ever gonna try that!"

    Click image for larger version

Name:	makani-kai-air-caravan-airplane-1-800x447.jpg
Views:	64
Size:	23.7 KB
ID:	1892419

    jack vines

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  • Kato
    replied
    Originally posted by Jeffry Cassel View Post
    Embarrassing but true. Speaks to how lots of us go looking for trouble. One of the few times I had my 64 Hawk out last fall., I kept looking in the mirror at a faint wisp of smoke behind me. Everything seemed ok, and it has never used a drop of oil, but I checked it when I got home and it was right on the mark. Went to put it back in the garage and noticed it was still there--even before start up! The mirror is also 57 years old and it is getting a little cloudy! Pilots have a term "auto-rough" When flying over a lake or rough terrain, the engine will automatically begin running rough as soon as you get out over water.
    LOL.. that is all so true. It's almost like we expect there to something wrong so we don't stop looking until we find it! I am a long time pilot and the "auto rough" analogy is very true. These days I spend hours and hours over the Pacific Ocean and those early days feelings when in single engine machines never quite goes away .. LOL
    Last edited by Kato; 05-01-2021, 04:38 PM.

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  • Jeffry Cassel
    replied
    Embarrassing but true. Speaks to how lots of us go looking for trouble. One of the few times I had my 64 Hawk out last fall., I kept looking in the mirror at a faint wisp of smoke behind me. Everything seemed ok, and it has never used a drop of oil, but I checked it when I got home and it was right on the mark. Went to put it back in the garage and noticed it was still there--even before start up! The mirror is also 57 years old and it is getting a little cloudy! Pilots have a term "auto-rough" When flying over a lake or rough terrain, the engine will automatically begin running rough as soon as you get out over water.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kato
    replied
    Originally posted by Hallabutt View Post
    It seems to me that much of a premature shift would be mitigated by a properly operating torque converter.
    I had the torque converter out two years ago to have a new ring gear installed. It checked out OK then but I suppose that doesn't necessarily mean its ok now!

    Leave a comment:


  • Kato
    replied
    Originally posted by StudeNorm View Post
    I had a carb with one bad float that did something similar, though there were a couple of other issues that went with it. I might check the float levels just to rule them out. That would also give you a chance to check/replace the valve and seats if you haven't already done that.
    Actually it's a brand new Edelbrock 1403 which was installed last year. It's been a challenge to get it dialed in and the float levels were off but set correctly now. That was a problem initially but not the problem now. There's something about this engine that is causing me grief, just haven't found it yet!

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  • jackb
    replied
    I had a valve sticking when I 1st got a 259 from sitting 15 years. Black smoke and tailpipe residue (single tail), ticking when idling (occasionally, and now after a long hot drive)..... Found 1 spark plug all black.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hallabutt
    replied
    It seems to me that much of a premature shift would be mitigated by a properly operating torque converter.

    Leave a comment:


  • StudeNorm
    replied
    I had a carb with one bad float that did something similar, though there were a couple of other issues that went with it. I might check the float levels just to rule them out. That would also give you a chance to check/replace the valve and seats if you haven't already done that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kato
    replied
    Originally posted by Lark Hunter View Post

    I would guess that it's more likely to be in the power circuit, unless you're really standing on it while accelerating... and in that case, the secondaries would already be open before the shift into third. At any given throttle position, manifold vacuum will drop as the transmission grabs the next higher gear... which may be enough for the power valve to open.

    As far as the difference due to ambient air temperature, or soot from only one bank of cylinders... I donno. It's voodoo . I've never had the guts to mess with aftermarket carburetors, as the tuning required to get one truly dialed in for a particular engine seems daunting.
    Yes that makes sense. I find the shift to third happens too early and the engine labors to keep accelerating. I know a tranny guy who knows these trannies well. I may talk to him to see if that can be adjusted.

    As for dialing in an aftermarket carb, I hear ya! It came with an even more finicky Holley but it has been a struggle to get this Edelbrock dialed in!

    Leave a comment:


  • Kato
    replied
    Originally posted by Milaca View Post
    Have you removed and inspected the spark plugs from the left-side of the engine? I am curious if all the plugs have the same burn-residue color and if they match those from the right-side of the engine.
    No I haven't yet but I certainly had the same thought. If this continues in warmer weather I'll do that!

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  • Lark Hunter
    replied
    Originally posted by Kato View Post
    It's only happening when the car shifts into 3rd and still accelerating so I assume when the secondaries open?
    I would guess that it's more likely to be in the power circuit, unless you're really standing on it while accelerating... and in that case, the secondaries would already be open before the shift into third. At any given throttle position, manifold vacuum will drop as the transmission grabs the next higher gear... which may be enough for the power valve to open.

    As far as the difference due to ambient air temperature, or soot from only one bank of cylinders... I donno. It's voodoo . I've never had the guts to mess with aftermarket carburetors, as the tuning required to get one truly dialed in for a particular engine seems daunting.

    Leave a comment:

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