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  • Exhaust: Black Smoke

    Any thoughts on why I would be getting black smoke on acceleration from the left pipe only? The 62 GT 289 has the cast headers and aluminum intake so no heat riser. I'm so far only noticing the smoke on cooler days but coming from one pipe only which I find puzzling?

  • #2
    Originally posted by Kato View Post
    Any thoughts on why I would be getting black smoke on acceleration from the left pipe only? The 62 GT 289 has the cast headers and aluminum intake so no heat riser. I'm so far only noticing the smoke on cooler days but coming from one pipe only which I find puzzling?
    Which aluminum intake? Which carburetor?

    jack vines
    PackardV8

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    • #3
      Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post

      Which aluminum intake? Which carburetor?

      jack vines
      Edelbrock 1403 and the Lionel Stone later version intake. There are no vacuum leaks and I didn't notice the smoke on a long drive the other day when it was much warmer. Possibly a cooler weather problem because of no heat riser? The car is running well too! Maybe drop the secondary jets down one or two?

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      • #4
        Black smoke=gas-Too rich mixture or excess choke. Blue smoke= oil- bad rings usually but not always. White smoke=coolant--glycol. Very strange that one bank is smoking and not the other. If it is cold and the choke is on, the heat riser will shunt exh. to warm manifold so that , if it is working, the ehaust is exiting the left pipe and very little leaving the right side. When it warms up, the heat riser opens and exhaust exists both sides. It appears to be functioning normally, but the choke might be set a tad too rich. No heat riser??? In Ontario??? Heat riser goes on exh manifold. There really is no other way for black smoke to come out the left side only when cold. It cannot run rich on the left bank only.

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        • #5
          Did the Aluminum Intake come with a Blocking Type center port Gasket or Plate for the Crossover Exhaust Heat Passage?
          StudeRich
          Second Generation Stude Driver,
          Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Jeffry Cassel View Post
            Black smoke=gas-Too rich mixture or excess choke. Blue smoke= oil- bad rings usually but not always. White smoke=coolant--glycol. Very strange that one bank is smoking and not the other. If it is cold and the choke is on, the heat riser will shunt exh. to warm manifold so that , if it is working, the ehaust is exiting the left pipe and very little leaving the right side. When it warms up, the heat riser opens and exhaust exists both sides. It appears to be functioning normally, but the choke might be set a tad too rich. No heat riser??? In Ontario??? Heat riser goes on exh manifold. There really is no other way for black smoke to come out the left side only when cold. It cannot run rich on the left bank only.
            The car has the cast iron headers that were made for Studebaker V8s, and maybe still are? I've seen them at swap meets. The headers have no heat riser. There is no longer a heat riser valve either. Honestly, I don't find it to be a problem. I only drive the car from late April until late October so it does not see much cold weather. On Saturday I drove it for 4 hours and it was about 70 degrees and I saw no smoke. Today I drove it home from a shop and it was only about 45 degrees and black smoke out the left pipe only, confirmed by my wife driving behind me. It's only happening when the car shifts into 3rd and still accelerating so I assume when the secondaries open? It has lots of power, no stumbling or anything. I was assuming perhaps the choke was not fully opening when the temperature was on the cooler side but the smoke out the left pipe only has me baffled! It may well have something to do with this manifold. I think if I could ever get my hands on a late model square bore 4 bbl manifold I would try that and see if it helps with some of these issues. I put the Edelbrock 1403 on last year because of an overly rich fuel burn. It had an older 350cfm Holley. It does get better mileage with the Edelbrock and except for this black smoke issue has been an improvement.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
              Did the Aluminum Intake come with a Blocking Type center port Gasket or Plate for the Crossover Exhaust Heat Passage?
              That is a very good question. Is there any way to tell that with the manifold installed? I've never had it off the car.

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              • #8
                I have one of the Lionel Stone aluminum manifold on my R1 Hawk with Carter AFB (made by Weber same as Edelbrock) 625 cfm carb and factory cast headers. I also have the Fariborn R2+ cam. I used the stock intake manifold gaskets and have had no issues with smoking or other problems. It runs really well.
                Dan White
                64 R1 GT
                64 R2 GT
                58 C Cab
                57 Broadmoor (Marvin)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Dan White View Post
                  I have one of the Lionel Stone aluminum manifold on my R1 Hawk with Carter AFB (made by Weber same as Edelbrock) 625 cfm carb and factory cast headers. I also have the Fariborn R2+ cam. I used the stock intake manifold gaskets and have had no issues with smoking or other problems. It runs really well.
                  Mine is running well too, that's what puzzles me about the smoke. If the choke is not opening fully you would think it wouldn't be running well!!! Only other thing I can think of is the secondary jets are too large but I didn't notice it smoking at all the other day when it was much warmer! I've had several "mysteries" with this car!

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                  • #10
                    Have you removed and inspected the spark plugs from the left-side of the engine? I am curious if all the plugs have the same burn-residue color and if they match those from the right-side of the engine.
                    sigpic
                    In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Kato View Post
                      It's only happening when the car shifts into 3rd and still accelerating so I assume when the secondaries open?
                      I would guess that it's more likely to be in the power circuit, unless you're really standing on it while accelerating... and in that case, the secondaries would already be open before the shift into third. At any given throttle position, manifold vacuum will drop as the transmission grabs the next higher gear... which may be enough for the power valve to open.

                      As far as the difference due to ambient air temperature, or soot from only one bank of cylinders... I donno. It's voodoo . I've never had the guts to mess with aftermarket carburetors, as the tuning required to get one truly dialed in for a particular engine seems daunting.

                      Whirling dervish of misinformation.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Milaca View Post
                        Have you removed and inspected the spark plugs from the left-side of the engine? I am curious if all the plugs have the same burn-residue color and if they match those from the right-side of the engine.
                        No I haven't yet but I certainly had the same thought. If this continues in warmer weather I'll do that!

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Lark Hunter View Post

                          I would guess that it's more likely to be in the power circuit, unless you're really standing on it while accelerating... and in that case, the secondaries would already be open before the shift into third. At any given throttle position, manifold vacuum will drop as the transmission grabs the next higher gear... which may be enough for the power valve to open.

                          As far as the difference due to ambient air temperature, or soot from only one bank of cylinders... I donno. It's voodoo . I've never had the guts to mess with aftermarket carburetors, as the tuning required to get one truly dialed in for a particular engine seems daunting.
                          Yes that makes sense. I find the shift to third happens too early and the engine labors to keep accelerating. I know a tranny guy who knows these trannies well. I may talk to him to see if that can be adjusted.

                          As for dialing in an aftermarket carb, I hear ya! It came with an even more finicky Holley but it has been a struggle to get this Edelbrock dialed in!

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                          • #14
                            I had a carb with one bad float that did something similar, though there were a couple of other issues that went with it. I might check the float levels just to rule them out. That would also give you a chance to check/replace the valve and seats if you haven't already done that.

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                            • #15
                              It seems to me that much of a premature shift would be mitigated by a properly operating torque converter.

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