Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

ACC Lead

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Ignition: ACC Lead

    In my ongoing efforts to get me delco radio working, I have identified a lead that comes off the ACC terminal of my ignition switch. It runs to a fused (currently blown 4 amps-the rarest fuse in the world) toggle switch under the dashboard. Another wire runs off the other side of the switch to nowhere. I'm hoping (once I find a fuse), that this will then be the hot lead for my radio. Question: Is this toggle switch "stock", or something the previous owner would have installed?

  • #2
    I doubt the toggle is stock but I know it originally didn't have anything to do with the radio. Why don't you connect the radio through a fuse to the ACC terminal of the ignition switch and see what happens.

    Now I know this is far fetched but perhaps the on-off switch of the radio got stuck in the on position and the PO added the toggle. Sounds far out but possible.

    Comment


    • #3
      Added underdash switches were often for the clock so that it could be turned off and not run the battery down with disuse of the car. The radio should have a fuse, but not a separate switch in the line.
      Gary L.
      Wappinger, NY

      SDC member since 1968
      Studebaker enthusiast much longer

      Comment


      • #4
        And a Toggle was used on some models for Front and Rear Speakers, when a "Fader" was not built into the Radio Tuning Knob, but it would have NO need of Ignition Switch POWER.
        I think we need to know the Model and Year of this Stude.
        StudeRich
        Second Generation Stude Driver,
        Proud '54 Starliner Owner

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Geohawk63 View Post
          In my ongoing efforts to get me delco radio working, I have identified a lead that comes off the ACC terminal of my ignition switch. It runs to a fused (currently blown 4 amps-the rarest fuse in the world) toggle switch under the dashboard. Another wire runs off the other side of the switch to nowhere. I'm hoping (once I find a fuse), that this will then be the hot lead for my radio. Question: Is this toggle switch "stock", or something the previous owner would have installed?
          It is indeed strange. But there were a lot of strange things done to this car before I bought it.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
            And a Toggle was used on some models for Front and Rear Speakers, when a "Fader" was not built into the Radio Tuning Knob, but it would have NO need of Ignition Switch POWER.
            I think we need to know the Model and Year of this Stude.
            1963 GT Hawk. Regarding the fuse, it is 4 amps, (a little over 1" long, and 1/4" diameter). which is what the Owner's Guide says is the amperage for the radio fuse if you have a manual, and 2.5 if you have an automatic. Are they talking about if you have a manual transmission or an automatic transmission?

            Comment


            • #7
              The radio in a 63 Hawk should have a wire with a fuse in line that connects to the accessory terminal on the ignition switch. There should be a three wire plug that connects to a three terminal connector on the lower left side of the radio. One wire connects to 12 volts and the other two go to the speaker. There should be a 2.5 amp fuse in line with the 12 volt lead to the radio, so I have no idea what the switch with a 4 amp fuse does, I've never seen something like that in any Hawk that I've worked on or owned. The transmission whether stick or auto has nothing to do with the radio's fuse rating. Bud

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Geohawk63 View Post

                1963 GT Hawk. Regarding the fuse, it is 4 amps, (a little over 1" long, and 1/4" diameter). which is what the Owner's Guide says is the amperage for the radio fuse if you have a manual, and 2.5 if you have an automatic. Are they talking about if you have a manual transmission or an automatic transmission?
                There were "Manual Tuning" Radios and "Push Button Tuning" Radios. There also were Radio "Manuals", as in Delco Radio "Books".
                StudeRich
                Second Generation Stude Driver,
                Proud '54 Starliner Owner

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Geohawk63 View Post

                  1963 GT Hawk. Regarding the fuse, it is 4 amps, (a little over 1" long, and 1/4" diameter). which is what the Owner's Guide says is the amperage for the radio fuse if you have a manual, and 2.5 if you have an automatic. Are they talking about if you have a manual transmission or an automatic transmission?
                  I believe that refers to the two different radios, manual tuning or push button (automatic) tuning (to me, signal seeking would be more automatic). I looked in a 1964 Hawk manual and it gives the same fuse information..
                  Gary L.
                  Wappinger, NY

                  SDC member since 1968
                  Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Bud View Post
                    The radio in a 63 Hawk should have a wire with a fuse in line that connects to the accessory terminal on the ignition switch. There should be a three wire plug that connects to a three terminal connector on the lower left side of the radio. One wire connects to 12 volts and the other two go to the speaker. There should be a 2.5 amp fuse in line with the 12 volt lead to the radio, so I have no idea what the switch with a 4 amp fuse does, I've never seen something like that in any Hawk that I've worked on or owned. The transmission whether stick or auto has nothing to do with the radio's fuse rating. Bud
                    Ya no that 3-wire plug is long gone! I got confused when the manual said automatic or manual - it was referring to whether the radio was a manual tuning (use a 4 amp fuse) radio versus push-button radio (use a 2.5 amp fuse), not the transmission! crazy.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      In 1962, the manual tuning radio had tubes in it, so it might need a larger fuse for the tube heaters. From 1963 and on, the radios were all transistor. The owners manual probably did not get changed to reflect the difference.
                      RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

                      17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
                      10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
                      10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
                      4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
                      5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
                      56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
                      60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X