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OHV main bearing woes

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  • #16
    I wonder what problems the factory was having? And yet he says it's possible with late main bearings (a must anyway)and will oil 'differently'...I wonder how it's different? And just different, or worse? The oil holes in the block are clocked about 20-30 degrees is all I see, other than that, I don't see a difference. I'm not clear what different oil hole locations in the block or crank would make, as long as the main gets oil and feeds it through the crank to the rods.

    But again, I am far from an expert in such matters.



    quote:Originally posted by 54-61-62

    This is a quote from Dick Daton's Stude 'high performace book':

    " It is easy to put togther a Stude six from misc. parts as there is a great deal of interchangability. There is however, a little bit of risk here which we have tried to point out ----

    I have checked a 185 crank against a 1964 180 crank and found the oil holes to the rods are drilled at different locations on the two center main bearing journals....What does this mean? If you plan to build a 185 OHV or put a 61-63 crank in a 63-64 full flow OHV sic blocl, you may encounter the same problem the factory had with using full-flow blocks and non-full flow cranks. IF you use a non-full-flow block ('61-62) you should be safe. A 185 crank in a late full-flow OHV block should be possible (using late main bearing sets) even though it will oil differently since the bearings are grooved and the early crank cross-drilled. "
    Ron Dame
    '63 Champ
    Ron Dame
    '63 Champ

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    • #17
      quote:Originally posted by bams50

      I was always taught that bearings should never be touched by fingers, as the acid in your fingers can damage the surface and lead to premature failure; so it follows that there is NO way I'd be comfortable drilling any[:0]
      Bob,

      This is what they make those un-powdered thin latex gloves for.......

      Paul
      Winston-Salem, NC
      Visit The NEW Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com
      Paul
      Winston-Salem, NC
      Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

      Comment


      • #18
        Thinking about where the hole in the main is, when the rod, and its hole wipe past the hole in the crank journal, the stream of oil is a little more open and a little more oil goes into the rod. Is there some place where oil is supposed to squirt from the other end of the rod? Like on the outboard cylinder wall to give it a bit more oil on the power stroke? Perhaps there was a reason for changing the oil hole, or perhaps they changed it because this way they could drill it in one operation, as opposed to two operations. I'm not familiar with the oil passages in either block.

        [img=left]http://www.alink.com/personal/tbredehoft/Avatar1.jpg[/img=left]
        Tom Bredehoft
        '53 Commander Coupe (since 1959)
        '55 President (6H Y6) State Sedan
        (Under Construction 571 hrs.)
        '05 Legacy Ltd Wagon
        All Indiana built cars

        Comment


        • #19
          Well as usual my parts books, the parts, and the computer are all distant from one another, BUT! I did stand the 185 crank, the partial flow OHV crank and the full flow OHV crank side by side, and to me it looks like the oil holes are all in the same place. The rods are all at the outermost point of the throw, and it seems like the hole in the crank is in the same place on each. There could be a few degrees difference, but I'm not sure.

          Besides, if the groove in the main bearing shell ensures that oil does all the around the bearing, does the exact location of the oil hole itself make any difference? Rods are all the same from at least early 1950's flatties through the end, so the oil squirter holes should be located the same.

          Maybe DD was having one of his moments when he wrote that bit about oiling. He sure seems to have been accused of odd ideas for years!

          Dwain G. suggests that the full flow oil hole location may have saved a step in machining, and I can see how, but I just don't see how that could change the ability to oil the mains, the rods, or the cylinders.

          Maybe I am just a real revolutionary in building the very first full flow 185 OHV champion engine! (Put THAT in your Funk and Wagnalls)




          quote:Originally posted by Tom B

          Thinking about where the hole in the main is, when the rod, and its hole wipe past the hole in the crank journal, the stream of oil is a little more open and a little more oil goes into the rod. Is there some place where oil is supposed to squirt from the other end of the rod? Like on the outboard cylinder wall to give it a bit more oil on the power stroke? Perhaps there was a reason for changing the oil hole, or perhaps they changed it because this way they could drill it in one operation, as opposed to two operations. I'm not familiar with the oil passages in either block.

          [img=left]http://www.alink.com/personal/tbredehoft/Avatar1.jpg[/img=left]
          Tom Bredehoft
          '53 Commander Coupe (since 1959)
          '55 President (6H Y6) State Sedan
          (Under Construction 571 hrs.)
          '05 Legacy Ltd Wagon
          All Indiana built cars
          Ron Dame
          '63 Champ
          Ron Dame
          '63 Champ

          Comment

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