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  • #16
    Agreed - I’ll ask the shop to ream out to within the 3-5 thou mentioned above. Excellent share here everyone.

    what a terrific forum - have a great one folks!

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    • #17
      Just for grins this morning, I pulled out the NOS car wheel studs that I have (at least, the ones with the early part numbers). Part numbers are 191843/191844 (superseded by Studebaker to 523702/523703, used on Commanders from mid-30s or so up to 1950, and on 1/2-ton trucks) and 196930/196931. All of these are stamped with BUDD on the back, and all the shanks measure .640" plus/minus a mil or two. Snapped a few pics, shown is p/n 196931 LH thread (double click the pic to open a larger version):

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      Paul
      Winston-Salem, NC
      Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

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      • #18
        Interesting isn’t it - 41/64” (0.640”) trying to fit into a 39/64” hole.

        Thanks to the quote in Videoranger’s post # 11, I checked the Dorman website and they have a massive table for wheel studs; yes this -036 unit is one of the only smooth studs they sell, non-serrated, and yes it’s 645 thou as well.

        I’m on the road to Memphis Monday morning and online I found what appears to be an experienced machine shop in Crossville TN that I’ll check out. I want to be there in person to speak to whoever is doing the work when I drop these hubs and studs off!

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        • #19
          I had to contact several machine shops in Omaha until I went to Tomasek machine shop, an old school shop in an old part of south omaha. It's a really neat shop that does machine work on old school lathes and milling machines etc for heavy trucks, cars, machines that can be repaired and not just replaced. Most new shops are going to CNC manufacture for specialized parts. I love the place! Great guys and very reasonable. Click image for larger version

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          • #20
            My guess is that SI is buying offshore stuff that has either quality control issues or poor manufacturing. I always buy this and other stuff from our small vendors. Might take a few calls but you get NOS and no need to chase the countryside for a shop. Shipping is no problem with something this small. My regional Stude vendor had these in stock for my truck and they went in as smooth as a baby's you know what......

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            • #21
              Nice to hear you found some for your truck. If you are guessing the Dorman studs being specified for the for the 62 Hawks are not correct, please provide information for a specific vendor and part number that is the better fit. Guessing and ranting does not provide any help.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Videoranger View Post
                Nice to hear you found some for your truck. If you are guessing the Dorman studs being specified for the for the 62 Hawks are not correct, please provide information for a specific vendor and part number that is the better fit. Guessing and ranting does not provide any help.
                I was thinking the same thing. It’s likely that any new ones are coming from Dorman who have been a fixture in the US auto industry longer than most of us have been alive.

                The only ones of the same nominal 5/8” with a smooth shoulder are these “610-036”...see chart...and get ready to pore through 150 SKU’s...

                https://static.dormanproducts.com/do...ttributes.xlsx

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                • #23
                  I don't see a rant, just a possible aftermarket fit problem (from SI - not Dorman). I didn't hear the OP state his studs were NOS vs. NORS ?? Anyway, for years I bought this (these) from Dennis D. in NH. He has since sold all parts to Ryan P. in MI........nice guy also....

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                  • #24
                    I believe The Dorman #610-036 wheel studs are the only newly manufactured ones listed for the 62 Hawks and other vehicles that require the same specs. I suspect the wheel studs originally sourced by Studebaker have a slightly smaller diameter that would fit the hubs and drums as manufactured with the proper press fit specification. If these are available it would be an easier installation. Dave did show pictures of the studs he purchased from SI and they are are Dorman 036. To fit these these the hubs and drum holes do need to be reamed to proper diameter for press fit and they do need to be swedged. Don't know how to locate Ryan P. in MI to see what he might have. Sorry about the "rant" comment Jack, I realize you were just trying to relate your experience with sourcing wheel studs.
                    Last edited by Videoranger; 04-05-2021, 08:52 AM.

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                    • #25
                      Dropped off the hubs and studs at a great old auto machine shop in Crossville, TN, on my long drive westward on I-40 on business. Will pick them up on Friday and post some pictures once they’re all done. Crossing my fingers that they are!

                      As discussed at length in the above posts, he’s going to ream them out to within 3 to 5 thou less than the new-stud shoulder diameter of .645.

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                      • #26
                        Success. Took a chance on a great little machine shop in central TN and without much effort the new Dorman studs are installed.

                        A sharp 41/64” drill bit, lithium lube and 2.5 tons of force (as seen on his press’ strain gauge) made it easy. Approximate average interference = 0.003”. No heat applied.

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                        • #27
                          At the home shop I used the two existing holes that the NOS drums (from S-I) have as pilots and bored two 7/32” holes in each of the hubs, then tapped them 1/4-20.

                          Inexpensive 1/4-20 screws sit nicely down in the holes, and the shoulders in the lugs ensure the drums are concentric when the screws are snug. Those of you having worked on disc brakes will have seen these - it saves me from staking the lugs and making future drum replacement easy.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by NCDave51 View Post
                            At the home shop I used the two existing holes that the NOS drums (from S-I) have as pilots and bored two 7/32” holes in each of the hubs, then tapped them 1/4-20.

                            Inexpensive 1/4-20 screws sit nicely down in the holes, and the shoulders in the lugs ensure the drums are concentric when the screws are snug. Those of you having worked on disc brakes will have seen these - it saves me from staking the lugs and making future drum replacement easy.
                            A lot of cars (Chryslers, for example, IIRC) used this method on drums/hubs. This is also a good way, if you are just replacing studs due to damage (or to get rid of the Left Hand studs that tire shops invariably don't notice and wring off), to ensure the drum stays concentric with the hub center.

                            Dave, you may want to consider taking those assembled front hubs/drums to a good shop that has a brake drum lathe and having them check to make sure the NOS drums ended up concentric with the hub center. If they are not, you may get a pulsation in the brake pedal. Several times when I've installed new drums, I've had to get them skim cut due to machining tolerances in the parts. Also, NOS drums can get warped and out of shape due to poor stacking/storage. And, some NOS drums may be 'seconds' that were not accepted for production work but deemed ok for service replacements. (I had a NOS rear drum for disc brake cars that had originally been machined so far out that once it was on the hub and trued up by machining, it was almost at the max allowable inside diameter!)
                            Paul
                            Winston-Salem, NC
                            Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

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                            • #29
                              Good advice, Paul. Thanks.

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                              • #30
                                Busy weekend.

                                With the mechanicals and hydraulics sorted earlier this month, the front hubs/studs were the only bottleneck to getting the Lark back on the ground.

                                The new 5.90-15 BFG bias ww’s and rim paint were discussed elsewhere here - decided I’d go back with the “F4 Deluxe” look for now with the hubcaps, even though I have nice Regal full wheel covers as well.

                                Thanks as always for the great discussion and advice in this thread.

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