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1964 Avanti..single leg

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  • Rear Axle: 1964 Avanti..single leg

    So back in 1997 I packed the rear bearings. Since then the car has traveled not quite 25K miles...as you can see the car is not utilized all that much. Now when Studebaker called for the bearings to be re-packed the bearing grease was different then today and in 1997. Do you think I can go a bit longer without another tear down? I have no issues with the bearings, and there is no unusual noises coming from the rear end.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Hawklover View Post
    So back in 1997 I packed the rear bearings. Since then the car has traveled not quite 25K miles...as you can see the car is not utilized all that much. Now when Studebaker called for the bearings to be re-packed the bearing grease was different then today and in 1997. Do you think I can go a bit longer without another tear down? I have no issues with the bearings, and there is no unusual noises coming from the rear end.
    Fantastic!!! You are blessed with the mental acuity to recall that you packed the bearings 24 years ago? Wow! Say a prayer of thanksgiving and praise and then get busy doing it again, while you are thinking about it so that you don't get rusty and lose the skill.
    John Clary
    Greer, SC

    SDC member since 1975

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    • #3
      Think about putting the grease fittings in the axle housing. I think the earlier Dana 44's came with them from the factory.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by jclary View Post

        Fantastic!!! You are blessed with the mental acuity to recall that you packed the bearings 24 years ago? Wow! Say a prayer of thanksgiving and praise and then get busy doing it again, while you are thinking about it so that you don't get rusty and lose the skill.
        LOL.........John I am an aged old man, who simply referred to the complete service records I have on the car going back to 1966~!~...funny how one does not need an excellent memory when he has everything memorialized on paper!!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Mark Plucenik View Post
          Think about putting the grease fittings in the axle housing. I think the earlier Dana 44's came with them from the factory.
          Yes back in the late 1950's:-(

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          • #6
            Just pack them again, and you will be good for another 25 years and 25K miles......................

            By then, you probably won't be able to get gas to drive the car anyway thanks to our government, so this will be the last rear axle bearing repack ever (unless you convert the car to electric).

            NOTE: Non-politically correct wording/phrases were automatically deleted.
            Paul
            Winston-Salem, NC
            Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

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            • #7
              I have always kept a grease zerk in a special place for greasing the rear axle bearings. I never leave it in. It is in a very vulnerable place to be snapped of from road debris. Besides, back in the day, it would be too tempting for a service station tech (remember those?) to pump several shots of grease in them just because they are there. In today's world, with the employees I have seen wielding grease guns at shops...you can't depend on them to lube the zerks they should and certainly not ignore the ones they should!

              It won't take too many extra pumps of grease into that area until you are pushing beyond the grease seal and greasing up your rear brakes... a bad idea. Before I ever shoot grease into the rear axle bearing, I always take the time to locate and clean the tiny Weep hole in the axle (I use a dental pick). When a little worm of grease begins to emerge from that hole, you're done. Just remove the zerk, replace the plug, and you are good for a few more years.
              John Clary
              Greer, SC

              SDC member since 1975

              Comment


              • #8
                I'd still do them again. Old grease gets hard and water can get mixed in. Use a modern grease, and it should be done for a long, long, time!
                Ron Dame
                '63 Champ

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by jclary View Post
                  I have always kept a grease zerk in a special place for greasing the rear axle bearings. I never leave it in. It is in a very vulnerable place to be snapped of from road debris. Besides, back in the day, it would be too tempting for a service station tech (remember those?) to pump several shots of grease in them just because they are there. In today's world, with the employees I have seen wielding grease guns at shops...you can't depend on them to lube the zerks they should and certainly not ignore the ones they should!

                  It won't take too many extra pumps of grease into that area until you are pushing beyond the grease seal and greasing up your rear brakes... a bad idea. Before I ever shoot grease into the rear axle bearing, I always take the time to locate and clean the tiny Weep hole in the axle (I use a dental pick). When a little worm of grease begins to emerge from that hole, you're done. Just remove the zerk, replace the plug, and you are good for a few more years.
                  I have looked for that 'weep" hole for over 50 years, and I have never found it. You realize we are talking about a Dana/Spicer #44 axle

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by jclary View Post
                    I have always kept a grease zerk in a special place for greasing the rear axle bearings. I never leave it in. It is in a very vulnerable place to be snapped of from road debris. Besides, back in the day, it would be too tempting for a service station tech (remember those?) to pump several shots of grease in them just because they are there. In today's world, with the employees I have seen wielding grease guns at shops...you can't depend on them to lube the zerks they should and certainly not ignore the ones they should!

                    It won't take too many extra pumps of grease into that area until you are pushing beyond the grease seal and greasing up your rear brakes... a bad idea. Before I ever shoot grease into the rear axle bearing, I always take the time to locate and clean the tiny Weep hole in the axle (I use a dental pick). When a little worm of grease begins to emerge from that hole, you're done. Just remove the zerk, replace the plug, and you are good for a few more years.
                    What model of car are you referring to?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Hawklover View Post

                      What model of car are you referring to?
                      That could be the issue? Many of us discuss our vehicles from the framework of our experiences. For me, the location of the fittings is all the same on my operational vehicles that includes my 1948 Champion Business Coupe, '51 Land Cruiser, and '55 truck. In addition, my 1960 V8 Lark (not presently registered) has the fitting & weep hole. That weep hole is very tiny and if your axle housing is really dirty it takes a good cleaning to reveal its location.

                      Until I got a collection of old dental tools, I used a small paper clip wire to clean it. I have always worried that failing to clean it would cause excess grease to get by the seal and into the brake components. I have read that the fittings were not present on later models. The newest Studebaker I ever owned was a '62 GT Hawk and I don't recall if it had the accessible Zerk fitting.
                      John Clary
                      Greer, SC

                      SDC member since 1975

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I’m familiar with the axle tube vent which is up top & typically covered by the spring clip that holds down the hard brake line.
                        Are you saying there are also weep holes where the axle tube swells to accommodate the rear axle bearings?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by skyway View Post
                          I’m familiar with the axle tube vent which is up top & typically covered by the spring clip that holds down the hard brake line.
                          Are you saying there are also weep holes where the axle tube swells to accommodate the rear axle bearings?
                          You know Gary, you might be right. It has been quite a long time since I have crawled under one to do those bearings. Today has turned sunny, but cold. Otherwise, I might just try to drag one out and take a look. The day I turned 70, I decided I would use my age as an excuse for forgetfulness whether true or not. Now, at 76, I think it becomes a legitimate reason from here on out.

                          I do know the weep holes are up top, and as far as I know only one near the bearing on each end of the axles. If the clip covers them then that's a plus. But, as old as these cars are getting, people making up their own brake lines, years of maintenance & neglect...whether the clips are in their original place is always suspect. We have some members who make their living as a mechanic. My formal mechanic days was when I was in the USAF working on equipment used to make aircraft fly. The bulk of my automotive experience has been in my backyard and truly hanging stuff off the shade tree. So, anyone taking my advice should always refer to their manuals, someone they trust, and the actual parts in their greasy hands.
                          John Clary
                          Greer, SC

                          SDC member since 1975

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                          • #14
                            I’ll see your 76, and raise you my 67. 😉

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jclary View Post

                              Fantastic!!! You are blessed with the mental acuity to recall that you packed the bearings 24 years ago? Wow! Say a prayer of thanksgiving and praise and then get busy doing it again, while you are thinking about it so that you don't get rusty and lose the skill.
                              Me bad............I totally forgot how I did the job:-( Can someone post the step-by-step procedures on a '64 Avanti? At my age and physical condition, I may have to give this job out to a shop that does mostly old vehicles, but it would great to show exactly what has to be done on the Avanti.

                              Thanks in advance:-)

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