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Brake job on my 1948 Commander

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  • Brakes: Brake job on my 1948 Commander

    Waiting on parts to finish the brakes. I still need to order new axle seals. I'm afraid I might have ruined the existing seals when I used a torch to heat the drums to remove them. I also need to figure out how to remove the existing brake linings so I can rivet the new linings on. I guess maybe grind them off. They were bonded linings. The linings look good in the picture, but the contact plugs are worn and rubbing on the drums.
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Someone just told me on Facebook that bonded linings can be heated to remove them. Would I use the torch to heat them, or maybe a heat gun?

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    • #3
      Best idea is to take the shoes to a brake shop and have them transfer the linings. They have the tools and the knowledge.
      RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

      17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
      10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
      10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
      4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
      5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
      56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
      60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

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      • #4
        Don't have much to add, as I haven't done this one before; but wanted to suggest that you try to suss out whether you're chipping or grinding into an asbestos containing material... it's not too common anymore, but the stuff is still out there.

        Then be ready for whatever area you're gonna work in to smell like a dumpster full of burning clutches for the next week after...
        Whirling dervish of misinformation.

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        • #5
          DO NOT GRIND OFF OLD LINING! There was a fellow who advertized in TW and I had him do a couple of mine. Good price, quick turnaround and good work. Haven't seen his ad in a while, tho. You can Google midwestbrake.com--they'll reline them for you. You might want to consider spending a little more for a lot more safety with Kevlar/carbon fiber linings from Porterfield. (porterfield-brakes.com)

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          • #6
            Seals should be replaced any time you take the drums off. Take the shoes to a shop that does brake lining replacement, and take your drums with you, so they can arch the shoes to fit the drums properly, and turn your drums. And don't forget to replace or rebuild the wheel cylinders and replace the flex line(s)!

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            • #7
              If Picture #1 is your existing Bonded Brake Shoes, WHAT is wrong with them that requires replacement? They look better than most New ones.

              They sure Look like Original 1970's Asbestos Linings.

              Properly adjusting the fit of NEW "Plugs" per the Studebaker Shop Manual and Rebuilding or Replacing the Wheel Cylinders and Inner and Outer Grease Seals may be all that is needed here!

              Of course you will need to Turn (if finished Size is under .060-.070 Over) or Replace the Drums due to the grooves from the improperly Fitted/Adjusted "Plugs".
              Last edited by StudeRich; 03-28-2021, 11:48 AM.
              StudeRich
              Second Generation Stude Driver,
              Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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              • #8
                I'm out in the garage doing an inventory of the parts that I need to do this right using the Studebaker Chassis Parts Catalogue. I think I will need to get advice from whatever parts store I'm ordering from about what parts I need to replace the axle seals. The book looks confusing on that part. Way out of my league here in trying this brake job. I don't see any step by step instructions on how to assemble all of the self adjusting washers, springs, clips, plugs etc., etc.. But I am determined. Thanks everyone for all of the help.

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                • #9
                  I think I'm getting it. When the wheel cylinder hone arrives in the mail and also some "C" clips and small springs I will be able to finish this job.
                  Attached Files

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                  • #10
                    Someone also said to drill and tap for a grease fitting on the axle to make future servicing easier. What nobody seems to remember or have experience with is before 1956 they were already drilled, and had a threaded plug in the housing. You un screw it and install a grease zerk fitting and you can grease the bearings. They eliminated it because too many service gas station grease monkeys kept pumping until it leaked past the seals into the brakes. 1 pump every few years is enough.
                    Bez Auto Alchemy
                    573-318-8948
                    http://bezautoalchemy.com


                    "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

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                    • #11
                      bezhawk.....Cool. I will look for that threaded plug tomorrow. Thanks.

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                      • #12
                        You really should replace those bronze 'plugs' That's how the self adjuster allegedly works. I might have a couple left-overs if you have trouble finding them.

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                        • #13
                          I think the Assembly and Adjustment Help you are desperately needing on this unique Automatic Adjusting Brake System is in the Studebaker Shop Manual.
                          StudeRich
                          Second Generation Stude Driver,
                          Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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