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Rear Brake shoes too big, 1950 CHampion

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  • Brakes: Rear Brake shoes too big, 1950 CHampion

    I have a 1950 Champion that I am trying to get back on the road after being dormant for some time. I took all of the brake shoes off and had them relined locally. The front shoes and drums went on fine but the rear drums won't fit over the shoes. Are the rear brake shoes supposed to have a thinner lining on them?

  • #2
    Not necessarily thinner than front, but who knows WHAT thickness today's re-liners would have used, THAT is the question.
    What size do the Drums Mic out as, if not turned you may have to, I have found new Factory replacement Drums that are actually Undersize!
    Last edited by StudeRich; 03-14-2021, 04:38 PM.
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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    • #3
      I would not jump right into turning the drums. I would first look at thinning the material on the shoes.

      Never modify the expensive, hard to get part. If something needs to be modified, always modify the inexpensive, easy to get, removable part.
      RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

      17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
      10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
      10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
      4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
      5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
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      • #4
        Check for slack in the parking brake cable. Be sure the adjusters are in a neutral position. They are adjusted from the back side of the backing plate. You may have 'over sized' linings that need to be 'arched '.
        Some brake shops use use thicker ones thinking you already have .040 drums or larger.

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        • #5
          I've got the emergency brake off and the adjusters in neutral position. I have one drum that has been turned and one brand new one. I've never heard of arching linings, does that have to be done on a lathe?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by BradEtters View Post
            I've got the emergency brake off and the adjusters in neutral position. I have one drum that has been turned and one brand new one. I've never heard of arching linings, does that have to be done on a lathe?
            Did the reliner shop have or ask for the brake drums? If not the new linings may need to be arc-ground on a special machine to match the radius of the drums. First though, back off the brake adjusters all the way, and what (S) is telling you is not just release the hand brake, but back that adjuster off also.
            AL SORAN RACING

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            • #7
              The Model 400 Ammco Drum and Disc Rotor Lathe MAY have the attachment to Arc Shoes, a good Brake Shop would have that.

              Here is the Shoe grinder:
              https://www.ebay.com/itm/Ammco-Model....c101196.m2219

              I am guessing you HAVE the correct Shoes of course, 9 Inch, all 8 the same, Front and Rear, the thickness should have matched each other.
              These have the "Plunger" Hole for Auto Adjusters in the Rear Shoe on each wheel.
              Last edited by StudeRich; 03-14-2021, 04:39 PM.
              StudeRich
              Second Generation Stude Driver,
              Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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              • #8
                Back when brake linings included asbestos as an ingredient, those brake shoe grinders were made illegal to use. It's unlikely that you will find a brake shop that admits to still having one. In a pinch, I suppose a 4-1/2" angle grinder with 36 or 50 grit paper could be used to grind down the linings but it would be hard to keep uniform thickness and a true arc. The other suggestion I have seen is to glue some 36 to 50 grit paper to the inside of the drum surface and hand rub the linings against it. That way, you will wind up with a lining surface that will match the drum exactly. Put a little chamfer on the ends of the lining to prevent crumbling. Wear a mask!

                I went through the same problem recently, but located an old machine which we "borrowed", refurbished, and managed to grind the over-thick shoes. We got lucky that the abrasive sheet on the grinding drum was up to the task as replacements are rare and very expensive. There are small steel angles riveted to the abrasive material to clamp the sheets in place on the drum. Now that brake linings do not include asbestos, you might think it would be OK for brake shops to have and use the grinders, but NO!

                Click image for larger version  Name:	brake shoe clamped.jpg Views:	0 Size:	112.5 KB ID:	1885205
                Brake shoe clamped on edges of metal backing.

                Click image for larger version  Name:	brake shoe ready.jpg Views:	0 Size:	110.6 KB ID:	1885206
                Ammco machine ready to grind shoe.
                Gary Ash
                Dartmouth, Mass.

                '32 Indy car replica (in progress)
                ’41 Commander Land Cruiser
                '48 M5
                '65 Wagonaire Commander
                '63 Wagonaire Standard
                web site at http://www.studegarage.com

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                • #9
                  Very nice, old school machine. It's great that it got saved. It seems that doing it by hand, with abrasive fastened into the drum would work, with a little elbow grease. i wonder if a diamond pad would work better on the lining material? http://www.amazon.com/HPW110H-Diamon...822303&sr=8-11

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                  • #10
                    Maybe use a drum sander? See them cheap or even free on CL.

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                    • #11
                      I like the Ammco 8000 machine, I watched a couple of videos of it over the weekend - they would sure do the trick.

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                      • #12
                        I got the rear drums on. I took the forked bar that goes between the emergency brake arm and the front shoe and increased the depth of one of the forks by .25". That allowed the shoes to close up enough so that I could get the drums on. I have no idea why I had to modify a stock part to get it to work but that is what I did to fix the problem. Thanks for the responses and hopefully this may help the next guy.

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