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bleed brakes when changing brake light switch 60 lark? or put in a universal near the pedal?

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  • Brakes: bleed brakes when changing brake light switch 60 lark? or put in a universal near the pedal?

    believe me i would not be here asking all kinds of questions, if things didn't go wrong so much,

    i jumped the 2 wires and the brake light work, i think it's the switch now, can i get away with not bleeding the brake?

    thanks again much appreciated

  • #2
    MW2013;
    I have. Now that I am a little older; I would put a little fluid in the switch and then when you get done; if you have a good brake pedal. I would not bother bleeding the system.
    It never hurts to flush the brake system; unless you are using silicon fluid and or have a newer master cylinder with a rubber bladder, the system absorbs moisture out of the air.
    Ron

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    • #3
      Originally posted by ronstrasser View Post
      MW2013;
      I have. Now that I am a little older; I would put a little fluid in the switch and then when you get done; if you have a good brake pedal. I would not bother bleeding the system.
      It never hurts to flush the brake system; unless you are using silicon fluid and or have a newer master cylinder with a rubber bladder, the system absorbs moisture out of the air.
      Ron
      thanks Ron, PO put in DOT 5 so no water absorbtion, i looked at it and it's on top, if i take it out, will fluid gush out?

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      • #4
        The best Permanent Fix is the Switch with a Lever replacement you read about here under the Floor against the Pedal Shaft as you mentioned.

        However, if you want to just replace the often fails Hydraulic Switch for now to get it on the Road, if you are quick to get your finger on the open hole and grab the New switch with the other hand you should only lose a drop. Just make sure the Pedal return spring works and the Pedal is all the way UP. With it up, there is no or very little pressure mostly gravity.
        StudeRich
        Second Generation Stude Driver,
        Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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        • #5
          Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
          The best Permanent Fix is the Switch with a Lever replacement you read about here under the Floor against the Pedal Shaft as you mentioned.

          However, if you want to just replace the often fails Hydraulic Switch for now to get it on the Road, if you are quick to get your finger on the open hole and grab the New switch with the other hand you should only lose a drop. Just make sure the Pedal return spring works and the Pedal is all the way UP. With it up, there is no or very little pressure mostly gravity.
          i may tie the pedal up just in case, can't drive it, was hand signalling on a shake down ride

          thank you Mr. Rich, where may i find this upgrade procedure, no wonder last night they were riding my ass when i was on the brakes and the taillights are archaic to begin with
          Last edited by mw2013; 03-07-2021, 03:30 PM.

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          • #6
            Dot 5 (silicone ) causes the brake switch to fail , So In order to get longer life out the switch I put regular brake fluid in the switch itself before installing it , It creates a barrier for awhile , They last longer , Ed

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            • #7
              Originally posted by jts359 View Post
              Dot 5 (silicone ) causes the brake switch to fail , So In order to get longer life out the switch I put regular brake fluid in the switch itself before installing it , It creates a barrier for awhile , They last longer , Ed
              what is the lifespan of these things in a DOT5 environment? there is always something, i don't think mixing the 2 is that great right?, i called autozone,"lifetime warrantee"
              Last edited by mw2013; 03-07-2021, 05:48 PM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by jts359 View Post
                Dot 5 (silicone ) causes the brake switch to fail , So In order to get longer life out the switch I put regular brake fluid in the switch itself before installing it , It creates a barrier for awhile , They last longer , Ed
                Not true, unless it's the STUDEBAKER brand switch that is always going bad, and more likely because its 60 years old.
                I've had DOT 5 fluid in one motorcycle for 41 years with original 43 year old factory switch, a car for 36 years with a generic parts store switch and another motorcycle for 26 years with it's factory switch and have NEVER had a pressure switch fail. The 26 year old motorcycle came from the factory with DOT 5.

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                • #9
                  the swtich in there don't look like no 60 year old nothing, it's shiny

                  what bike is that? all the bikes i had , used mech switches, but then again they were all japanese bikes, i thought DOT 5 is something new, i have never seen a pressure switch used for a stop light, only a mechanical with a spring action and you say you have numerous vehicles with these types of switches? how lucky are you?

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                  • #10
                    It is very possible all bensherb's switches were TOO Old to be poor quality and Fail, MOST made in the last 10 or more years actually do in as soon as 6 Months, they often start needing more pressure than a Normal stop to work, then they don't. That explains yours being shinny, it may be less than a Year Old.

                    Studebaker or an Aftermarket Studebaker Vendor NEVER Made ANY, or had any made. They are common Automotive switches used by all US Auto and Motorcycle Mfg's.
                    Those are Parts Store items made by Echlin, Standard Parts and others in Mexico and then China.

                    Here is Tool Dude Tony's Studebaker Stop Light Switch Fix Video:

                    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kVX3sWlTn1Y
                    Last edited by StudeRich; 03-07-2021, 10:31 PM.
                    StudeRich
                    Second Generation Stude Driver,
                    Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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                    • #11
                      Good share, Rich. Nice install.

                      My ‘57 Chev 3104 (1/2 ton) used the very same switch. Simple operation and easy replacement - just keep it out of splash/dirt.

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                      • #12
                        Some people are very lucky , or they dont have brake lights , Ed

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                        • #13
                          True, the original type 1/8" pipe threaded switches for our Studes (both NOS and repro) will fail prematurely (usually less than a year) with DOT-5. The fix I found was a Harley DOT-5 switch, but not their earlier version. Their early version looks exactly like our Stude version, and also fails prematurely. Harley's later version is longer and skinnier, but screws right in place, and is a PERMANENT fix. If I recall it, as everything else from Harley, was not cheap, maybe $35-$40.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by mw2013 View Post

                            what is the lifespan of these things in a DOT5 environment? there is always something, i don't think mixing the 2 is that great right?, i called autozone,"lifetime warrantee"
                            If AutoZone, or someone else. is willing to give you a lifetime warrantee in writing, I would just buy their replacement switch, put it in immediately upon removing the old one and then not worry about it until it fails again.
                            Gary L.
                            Wappinger, NY

                            SDC member since 1968
                            Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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                            • #15
                              I installed a mechanical brake light switch on my ‘60 Lark, using the common lever operated one. The main reason I did this retrofit is to have “instant on” brake lights for my aftermarket cruise control; with the hydraulic switch I had to jab the brakes to operate the brake lights/and disconnect the cruise. With the the mechanical switch it takes just a tap to blink the brake lights.

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