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  • #16
    You said that the smoke is blue, but is there any chance that it is a coolant leak into the combustion chamber? That is usually white smoke, and can get worse as it warms up. Maybe bad head gasket? If it is a coolant leak, you can sometimes see bubbles come up in the radiator filler neck while it is running.

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    • #17
      You still don't get It, the Fuel Pump Rubber Diaphragm tears and allows Fuel to leak into the Crankcase, that dilutes the Oil and will burn and smoke.

      We can't tell from here for sure, but it COULD be, it HAS happened.
      StudeRich
      Second Generation Stude Driver,
      Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Lumaanton84 View Post

        You right it passes to the fuel filter and to the fuel pump . But me I don't call that fuel pump because it's not electronic . I will buy a new one .

        I don't think its the problem the fuel pump .

        the fuel pump only send gas to carburetor.

        It can't make the car smoke blue color .
        You've asked for help with your problem yet the most obvious cause is the mechanical fuel pump as many have told you. That's a known problem with the old mechanical pumps and a pump is a pump, regardless of whether or not it's a mechanical or electrical one. I had a Golden Hawk that pumped a couple of quarts of gas into the crankcase before I realized it. The internal diaphragm was leaking gas into the oil. If you pull the pump off your engine you'll see there's a wide open galley where the actuating arm of the pump rides on an eccentric and that opening in the block leads right into the oil pan. Clearly, it's obvious that you are new to working on old cars and it's not cool to argue with guys who are trying to help you. When your oil gets diluted by the gasoline it goes down so low in viscosity that it will go right past the oil rings on the pistons. The blue smoke is from burning oil. Get a new mechanical pump, change the oil and you'll be fine. And, stop arguing with the old guys who've worked on the cars for over 40 or 50 years - they're trying to help you.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Lumaanton84 View Post

          WHAT DO YOU MEAN BY Compression .

          Because compression its not mesur with LBS its Measure with PSI .
          Compression is PSI alright. You get a compression gauge, put it where the spark plugs go, with all the plugs out, the throttle wide open, crank it over 10-15 times. Write down the number, then put a teaspoon of oil down the spark plug hole and put the compression gauge back in, crank the motor again the same way, and write down the number. If the numbers are more than 10-15(MAX) PSI different, then you have bad cylinders, could be rings, could be pistons and or bore. If compression is low, like 50PSI, and oil makes no difference, then you have bad valves. OK? Ya wanna know why it's smoking, that's where you start. And, as said before, ya gotta have clean oil, whether the fuel pump is dumping gas into the oil, or the carb is doing the same thing, or both. If the jump is big in the test, like from ~50, to say, 100PSI, you are going to have to tear the motor down and hope the bore is good, and the story goes on.....

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          • #20
            All that separates the gasoline from the crankcase oil is the rubber diaphragm in the fuel pump. Gas eats rubber. A tiny hole in the diaphragm can eventually pump a lot of gas into the crankcase. You should have it rebuilt. I believe Dave Thibault (sp?) can do it he's good or I have used Trrell Machine in DeLeon, Texas; they do good work. Try adding Rislone to free possible sticking rings. They're not a lot of 6 volt electric fuel pumps out there.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by tertiumquid View Post

              You've asked for help with your problem yet the most obvious cause is the mechanical fuel pump as many have told you. That's a known problem with the old mechanical pumps and a pump is a pump, regardless of whether or not it's a mechanical or electrical one. I had a Golden Hawk that pumped a couple of quarts of gas into the crankcase before I realized it. The internal diaphragm was leaking gas into the oil. If you pull the pump off your engine you'll see there's a wide open galley where the actuating arm of the pump rides on an eccentric and that opening in the block leads right into the oil pan. Clearly, it's obvious that you are new to working on old cars and it's not cool to argue with guys who are trying to help you. When your oil gets diluted by the gasoline it goes down so low in viscosity that it will go right past the oil rings on the pistons. The blue smoke is from burning oil. Get a new mechanical pump, change the oil and you'll be fine. And, stop arguing with the old guys who've worked on the cars for over 40 or 50 years - they're trying to help you.
              Yep. It can get frustrating, eh?

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by tsenecal View Post
                You said that the smoke is blue, but is there any chance that it is a coolant leak into the combustion chamber? That is usually white smoke, and can get worse as it warms up. Maybe bad head gasket? If it is a coolant leak, you can sometimes see bubbles come up in the radiator filler neck while it is running.
                I didn't changed head gasket

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
                  You still don't get It, the Fuel Pump Rubber Diaphragm tears and allows Fuel to leak into the Crankcase, that dilutes the Oil and will burn and smoke.

                  We can't tell from here for sure, but it COULD be, it HAS happened.
                  Thank you for your answer .
                  I will check it

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by tertiumquid View Post

                    You've asked for help with your problem yet the most obvious cause is the mechanical fuel pump as many have told you. That's a known problem with the old mechanical pumps and a pump is a pump, regardless of whether or not it's a mechanical or electrical one. I had a Golden Hawk that pumped a couple of quarts of gas into the crankcase before I realized it. The internal diaphragm was leaking gas into the oil. If you pull the pump off your engine you'll see there's a wide open galley where the actuating arm of the pump rides on an eccentric and that opening in the block leads right into the oil pan. Clearly, it's obvious that you are new to working on old cars and it's not cool to argue with guys who are trying to help you. When your oil gets diluted by the gasoline it goes down so low in viscosity that it will go right past the oil rings on the pistons. The blue smoke is from burning oil. Get a new mechanical pump, change the oil and you'll be fine. And, stop arguing with the old guys who've worked on the cars for over 40 or 50 years - they're trying to help you.
                    I'm sorry .

                    Thank you so much for your answer .
                    I will check it.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by yeroldad View Post

                      Compression is PSI alright. You get a compression gauge, put it where the spark plugs go, with all the plugs out, the throttle wide open, crank it over 10-15 times. Write down the number, then put a teaspoon of oil down the spark plug hole and put the compression gauge back in, crank the motor again the same way, and write down the number. If the numbers are more than 10-15(MAX) PSI different, then you have bad cylinders, could be rings, could be pistons and or bore. If compression is low, like 50PSI, and oil makes no difference, then you have bad valves. OK? Ya wanna know why it's smoking, that's where you start. And, as said before, ya gotta have clean oil, whether the fuel pump is dumping gas into the oil, or the carb is doing the same thing, or both. If the jump is big in the test, like from ~50, to say, 100PSI, you are going to have to tear the motor down and hope the bore is good, and the story goes on.....
                      Thank you for your answer

                      I will check it again

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Jeffry Cassel View Post
                        All that separates the gasoline from the crankcase oil is the rubber diaphragm in the fuel pump. Gas eats rubber. A tiny hole in the diaphragm can eventually pump a lot of gas into the crankcase. You should have it rebuilt. I believe Dave Thibault (sp?) can do it he's good or I have used Trrell Machine in DeLeon, Texas; they do good work. Try adding Rislone to free possible sticking rings. They're not a lot of 6 volt electric fuel pumps out there.
                        Thanks you so much for your answer.
                        I will change it

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by yeroldad View Post

                          Yep. It can get frustrating, eh?
                          Thank you so much for your help .
                          I'm waiting to get the weather Warmer and then I would change it.

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