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  • #16
    Back into the USA last Saturday, having been in eastern Canada for 30 days on a mill startup project. Able to get now back to the windlace task.

    The repro brown material from S-I looks good and yes - as others replied above - the trim tab is too darn short to reach the claws. So, off to a local alterations place to stitch on some 1” cotton twill ribbon from Jo-Ann.

    I’m still leaving the knit headliner in place as I’ve figured out ways to work around it. Down the road, sure it might be replaced but for now the old cloth stays in. Don’t feel like pulling in the wind shield and rear glass this year.

    For others doing it on their 59-60 Lark the metal teasel strips (with the fine teeth that secure the headliner) are separate from the roof structure and are held in by T-posts. The good news is that these are reasonably flexible and can bend back (inwards, towards the interior) giving one more room to properly pinch the windlace down underneath the claws. Will send a pic of installation once the material comes back from sewing.

    In the meantime I always love exploring areas in this car that have never seen daylight, such as under these kick panels for example. Similar to the door date stencil “2 27” and interior rear quarter stencil “2 21”, my right front is showing “2 19”. Also noted that the factory gave a light coral paint spray on the right side but left the left side in primer. Speaks to the human character of these cars.

    Underlayment from my Automotive Interiors carpet kit can be seen. I went with a brown nylon loop and the test-fit and finish are excellent .

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    • #17
      Every discussion of windlace and headliner installation should include a reference to Ray Fichthorn's articles.
      https://studebakersocal.com/RayLin_W...stallation.htm
      https://studebakersocal.com/RayLin_1...tallations.htm
      Bill
      http://www.rustyrestorations.org/index.php
      sigpic

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      • #18
        That right side kick panel (picture left) has been replaced with what looks like 2 pieces of flat stock (at least the forward section). See no structural indents for strength. I believe the 2/19 has nothing to do with the car's build date. It is a confusing picture...

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        • #19
          Not possible, Jack - it’s an unmolested Nebraska original. Everything from my Order Date to engine date, transmission date etc are pointing to February - early March 1959, so a strong coincidence, maybe.

          Here’s a retake with flash-on to remove that shadow.

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          • #20
            Completed the installation of the brown windlace from S-Int’l today, drivers side first.

            Once I learned the tricky spots, the passenger side took half the time! For those tackling this, it’s not as bad as I first imagined.

            The factory shoved a good 2” of excess headliner up into the roof, tucked up behind the “teasel strip”. To get a start on it, remove your B-pillar panel, and this on a 2-door sedan its revealed by taking off the rear quarter window surround (5 screws).

            Take pliers and twist to remove the “T-clip” securing the rear of the teasel strip to the body. This will give clearer access to the claws that secured the windlace. Pry each claw open slightly.

            The end of the excess headliner that was tucked/hidden by the B-pillar panel under the end of the teasel can now be pulled down by hand. Work your way slowly around the door by applying gentle downward tension to the cloth while lifting the headliner off the teasel barbs using a metal or plastic putty knife (with corners rounded off). A dental pick is great for any thread loops that are still snagged.

            I started at the rear of the door, with 2-3” excess windlace on the floor, to be trimmed and covered by carpet later. Tuck the cloth+tab of the windlace under each claw, with the body of the windlace flush and to the inside of the door frame. Tap the claw closed with a light hammer and drift. The top rear corner of the door is tricky, but this is why allowing the teasel strip to be free really helps.

            When you get to the dash of a Lark, the A-pillar cover is also removed (4 screws) and the single #6-8 screw that secures the tip of the dash panel to the body can be removed. You’ll need to spread the dash-to-body a touch to slip the windlace in between and access the several claws that are hidden there. Curved dental picks and good lighting are essential. A long thin drift or a small pry bar are the only way to close the hidden claws.

            With the windlace fitted to your liking, the headliner simply gets tucked back in; the tension of tucking it in will set it on the small barbs of the teasel.

            Overall, it’s clearly possible to install the windlace without removal of the headliner; only the edges needed doing.
            Last edited by NCDave51; 02-27-2021, 06:07 PM.

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            • #21
              All done with the interior, trimmed with new brown loop carpet from Automotive Interiors. First class quality, edging, grommet for dimmer switch, underlayment, etc.

              Seats and door panels are all March 1959 survivors and in great condition - they were all covered by clear vinyl until early 2020.
              Attached Files

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              • #22
                Originally posted by NCDave51 View Post
                All done with the interior, trimmed with new brown loop carpet from Automotive Interiors. First class quality, edging, grommet for dimmer switch, underlayment, etc.

                Seats and door panels are all March 1959 survivors and in great condition - they were all covered by clear vinyl until early 2020.
                People used to laugh about the clear vinyl seat covers put on new cars. Who's laughing now? Looks like a great job!

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