Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

what to do with a freeze plug that is weeping

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Cool/Heat: what to do with a freeze plug that is weeping

    toss in some radiator stop leak? i see green stuff moistening the pan gasket, and staining the dip stick area Click image for larger version

Name:	103_0059.JPG
Views:	652
Size:	131.8 KB
ID:	1875547


  • #2
    Replace it, though that plug looks awfully clean to be old.
    Last edited by tim333; 01-18-2021, 06:35 AM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Radiator stop leak is a stopgap solution. And stopgap solutions are just that; stopgap and short term; never meant to be solutions.
      Put it in if you need to limp your cooling system until you can drain it, flush the block and replace the plug.
      Perhaps take the opportunity to pull ALL the plugs and chisel as much detritus from the water jacket as you can. If it's never been done, you will find a lot of internal sand and sprues from the original foundry that keep the block from running as cool as it can.
      "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

      Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
      Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
      '33 Rockne 10,
      '51 Commander Starlight,
      '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée",
      '56 Sky Hawk

      Comment


      • #4
        rebuilt engine m block was cleaned for $92.99 as part of the prep

        Comment


        • #5
          You might check that Cooling System Drain Plug, as it looks just as wet as the Core Plug, it could be the cause or part of it.

          Most of us now use Brass Core Plugs, not the cheaper steel ones like that.
          Coating it with #2 Permatex will help seal it.
          StudeRich
          Second Generation Stude Driver,
          Proud '54 Starliner Owner

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by mw2013 View Post
            rebuilt engine m block was cleaned for $92.99 as part of the prep
            Wondering how extensive this rebuilt engine was? You would think the freeze plugs would have been replaced at the time since there looks to be corrosion at the bottom.

            Comment


            • #7
              I would pop that one out and have a good look at the inside of the block. It may not be as clean as you think. If it is clean, pop a new brass one in and keep on driving. My block was hot tanked, then pressure washed through the passages, then hot tanked again. As mentioned above, you might find mineral deposits, sand, and even wire in the water jacket. Stop leak might stop the leak, but it also slows the flow in the heater core and radiator.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
                You might check that Cooling System Drain Plug, as it looks just as wet as the Core Plug, it could be the cause or part of it.

                Most of us now use Brass Core Plugs, not the cheaper steel ones like that.
                Coating it with #2 Permatex will help seal it.
                thanks good diagnostic eye, it appears to be the drain plug, is it tapered thread? i'll give it a little turn

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by mw2013 View Post
                  thanks good diagnostic eye, it appears to be the drain plug, is it tapered thread? i'll give it a little turn
                  Be very careful in tightening that drain plug. It is a pipe thread and, if overly tightened, will crack the block. (Don't ask how I know. LOL) I'd replace it with a brass one, and coat the new plug's threads with your favorite sealant, i.e. Permatex 2. Be sure the brass plug has a square head, as the current one has, or hex head. Avoid using one with a female hex head, designed for an Allen wrench. Since the freeze plug is one of the easy ones to access, I'd replace it too, with a brass one. Be sure the new one is deep dish style, as the one currently installed is, and use your favorite sealant around the OD and ID of the block. As mentioned, it's also a good time to check cleanliness of the block. If it was, indeed hot tanked, baked, vibrated or otherwise cleaned, it should be pretty clean already. But be surprised at nothing. Before installing a new freeze plug, you might wanna use sandpaper to clean the ID of the hole in the block, but be careful not to remove actual metal, lest the new plug now seal properly.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Joe, what do you not like about the Allen heads ?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Joe,
                      I often use a brass wire wheel on a portable drill to thoroughly clean the holes prior to new plug installation.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If anyone is interested the Dorman Brass Core Plug, shallow dish, part number is 565-077. china made natch. get a box of ten for screw ups and future use. Luck Doofus

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Everything I've encountered with a Dorman name on it has been low grade junk. That said, it would be pretty hard to screw up a core plug... though the steel one in the block now appears to be Dorman branded. Are there any other relevant suppliers still out there?
                          Whirling dervish of misinformation.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by firestoper 25 View Post
                            Joe, what do you not like about the Allen heads ?
                            I think it is pretty Obvious why Joe would not use Recessed Allen Plugs, you can get MUCH better leverage with a 5/8" Hex head Brass (Plumbing Supply) Plug. After it is seized and rusted in there and tightened enough to not leak, you WILL need that.

                            The Tiny Allen hole will strip out, it just isn't the place for one.
                            StudeRich
                            Second Generation Stude Driver,
                            Proud '54 Starliner Owner

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Lark Hunter View Post
                              Everything I've encountered with a Dorman name on it has been low grade junk. That said, it would be pretty hard to screw up a core plug... though the steel one in the block now appears to be Dorman branded. Are there any other relevant suppliers still out there?
                              I used Dorman as well on my 170-6 with an excellent fit. The rear camshaft plug (hidden behind the engine mounting plate) that came to me from a "Studebaker Vendor" is also a Dorman unit.

                              All thick gauge steel - hard to mess up a core plug, agreed!

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X