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  • #16
    Originally posted by 345 DeSoto View Post
    One quart of Rislone added to each oil change (in place of one quart of oil) will gradually clean up a dirty engine...
    As will MMO!!

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    • #17
      I have an old off-topic car with a filter; it was clear the car was always run on ND before I got it and the oil was black as coal. I changed it (30 wt ND) and found it was using a quart every couple hundred miles. I kept driving it, kept changing the oil every 2k miles, and watched as the oil stayed cleaner & cleaner, and oil consumption quickly dropped until I could drive 2k without losing a full quart (and a nice, clean dipstick). Then I re-read the 10,000 threads out there on the net about this topic and realized I couldn't find a single instance of an engine failure related to switching, just speculation. I switched about 5k miles ago and watched consumption continue to fall and nothing bad happened at all. NOW, if it didn't have a filter? I don't know if I'd trust it. There's a reason a lot of small engines call for ND and my understanding is it is directly related to the lack of filter.

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      • #18
        On a dirty engine, I've run a quart of ATF in it at idle for about 15 minutes just before I change the oil. I wouldn't drive the car though. YMMV.
        "Man plans, God laughs".

        Anon

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        • #19
          The beat goes on with this topic. Thank you all.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Bryan G View Post
            There's a reason a lot of small engines call for ND and my understanding is it is directly related to the lack of filter.
            I was a power equipment mechanic for far too long in a previous lifetime, and non-detergent oil was never specified by any manufacturer for anything I worked on. Even the cheapest disposable lawn mower required whatever was the latest API spec oil at the time of manufacture, and all that I remember warned against using ND oil. Service reqs followed roughly the same guidelines as automobiles, but in hours instead of miles. The only thing that stood out was Briggs and Tecumseh (still in business back then) recommended 30wt (detergent) as standard fill. Most of the others wanted or required multigrade. If you dipped back into the 1950's or earlier, you could find a few 2 strokes that permitted the use of ND oil if something better wasn't available... it's another one of those myths that keeps on persisting.

            Have had some automotive engines that were clearly neglected, but I've never had the heart to feed 'em non-detergent oil. Never had any untoward effects, even on a couple with no filter. Didn't see any aggressive action against built up sludge, and a quick check of the dipstick before taking off eased my mind. Only engine failure I can think of was on a friend's Toyota pickup back in high school. He supposedly used some type of engine flush to clean things up, and knocked a bunch of stuff loose. It immediately started smoking like a pig, limped along for another year, then expired. I highly suspect that he did something weird, like filling up the crankcase with diesel and running it for 30 minutes or something, but who knows. Whatever works for you, eh?
            Whirling dervish of misinformation.

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            • #21
              I suspect that reported damage after an abusive life is most often caused by the previous abuse and neglect and not the the engine oil used now. I've seen two pre-war engines that were disassembled after years of inactivity, that clearly showed the effect of the long term storage with acid laced oil. Neither engine had been started after the long inactivity, but had they been started, they wouldn't have lasted very long.

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              • #22
                People reporting that they had an engine failure after switching from a non detergent oil to a modern compounded oil were dealing with an engine that had reached the end of its life as evidenced by a massive sludge build up on its internal parts. Switching from a nondetergent oil to a compounded oil in my opinion did not cause the engine to fail, but infrequent service and high engine hours did. Like I said in an earlier post, modern oils have an additive package meant to prevent sludge, corrosion and wear and not as a strong cleaning agent. Like Lark Hunter says, no engine manufacturer since the late 30's has recommended the use of a non detergent oil in their engines and that includes Studebaker. Bud

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                • #23
                  FWIW the 1941 shop manual (pre detergent era) calls for a yearly removal and cleaning of the oil pan, to remove the sludge... My untouched straight 8 with 57k is still on ND oil. It generates 45 psi hot on the highway. No I haven't done this "maintenance" yet...
                  With a partial flow filter system the sludge dirt would be fed into those nice tight main and rod bearings. So I'm not inclined to gamble. Even when I do clean the pan.

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                  • #24
                    Thank you.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by RadioRoy View Post
                      This is a good reason to put an oil filter on the engine. There is actually no good reason not to put one on the engine.

                      I'm nominating the above for "Quote of the Month!"

                      OK, OK, I know that there ain't no such thang but I gave it my best shot...

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                      • #26
                        I searched the forum about adding an oil filter to a 170 motor, or in my case a detuned 185 motor, and couldn't find anything. Is there information elsewhere?

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                        • #27
                          Bing, (Edsel Face", please see this new Post:

                          https://forum.studebakerdriversclub....ow-oil-filters
                          StudeRich
                          Second Generation Stude Driver,
                          Proud '54 Starliner Owner
                          SDC Member Since 1967

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                          • #28
                            I'm reminded here of the John Muir "bible", also known as "How to Keep Your Volkswagen Alive" - which every air-cooled VW enthusiast of any worth had near them in the garage.

                            In it, Muir strongly cautioned about switching from ND to D oils. If you're running ND, keep running ND. Worst thing to do - unless you're heading into a complete tear-down soon - is to have detergents come on the scene to lift and suspend and transport sludge and debris to the nether regions of your VW engine. Same applies for Studebakers.

                            And final grist for this lengthy mill: a A VW Beetle never, ever came equipped with an oil filter from the factory. It had a simple steel mesh screen that surrounded the oilpump suction. And as we know, a properly maintained oil-cooled VW engines were hardy beasts that run forever. Yes, these clever engines had oil coolers in their fan shrouds so full flow there was key.

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