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a possible method to replace rear brake drums?

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  • Brakes: a possible method to replace rear brake drums?

    On another forum (Jalopy Journal) there was this link to show how the MoPar guys can use a "common" read less expensive, rear brake drum, I wonder if anyone on this forum has either heard of it or tried it and if it was successful.

    http://www.hotrodsandhemis.com/TaperedAxleBrakes.html

  • #2
    Interesting MoPar Site.
    Here is what people forget when they boast about how they cut the Swagge's off of their Studs dissassembled the Hub/Drum, Replaced the Studs and just slipped a Drum on and called it good for ease of maintenance.

    These Mopar people could get away with that much better than a Stude. Owner.
    This Dodge Axle with a HUB on it that has had the drum torn off, shows that these Hubs are not centered by the Studs as a Stude. is, but by a Center Ridge. THAT would make all the difference and make their Plan doable.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Dodge Drum.JPG
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ID:	1874557

    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner
    SDC Member Since 1967

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    • #3
      When I made my living working on Mazda’s, all of the ones that had rear drum brakes had two countersunk Phillips-head screws securing the drum to the axle in the rear. It would be so simple to drill 2 holes across from each other in the Stude drum, through the hub flange, and countersink them... THEN cut the swages off, remove the drum, and tap the holes in the flange. It’s a simple matter, then, to slide the drum back on, and screw the two screws into their holes, which automatically center the drum. And of course, once the wheel is bolted on over it, it ain’t gonna go nowhere!
      I just may do that on my next Stude rear brake job...
      1950 Commander Land Cruiser
      1951 Champion Business Coupe
      1951 Commander Starlight
      1952 Champion 2Dr. Sedan
      1953 Champion Starlight
      1953 Commander Starliner
      1953 2R5
      1956 Golden Hawk Jet Streak
      1957 Silver Hawk
      1957 3E5 Pick-Up
      1959 Silver Hawk
      1961 Hawk
      1962 Cruiser 4 speed
      1963 Daytona Convertible
      1964 Daytona R2 4 speed
      1965 Cruiser
      1970 Avanti

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      • #4
        I’ve always liked using the hub puller. There are so few scenarios where it’s okay to beat on your old car with a sledge hammer.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by 1953champcoupe View Post
          On another forum (Jalopy Journal) there was this link to show how the MoPar guys can use a "common" read less expensive, rear brake drum, I wonder if anyone on this forum has either heard of it or tried it and if it was successful.

          http://www.hotrodsandhemis.com/TaperedAxleBrakes.html
          One thing this MoPar article says to do that Studebaker owners should NOT follow: "When the hub is reinstalled, a little anti-seize will make this process much easier if it ever has to be repeated." Using any type of lubricant on the axle/hub taper risks splitting the hub.
          Paul
          Winston-Salem, NC
          Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

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          • #6
            drum brakes had two countersunk Phillips-head screws securing the drum to the axle in the rear.
            Long ago we had a '47 chevy 3/4 ton pickup on the farm. It had 17" split rims with a locking ring. At least the front drums had 2 countersunk screws holding the drum to the hub like that. Not sure about the back other than it was a floating axle type.

            Jeff in ND

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            • #7
              Originally posted by 1953champcoupe View Post
              On another forum (Jalopy Journal) there was this link to show how the MoPar guys can use a "common" read less expensive, rear brake drum, I wonder if anyone on this forum has either heard of it or tried it and if it was successful.

              http://www.hotrodsandhemis.com/TaperedAxleBrakes.html
              Yes, I have done this successfully on two Hawks, using repro drums, as the Mopar link shows. But there's a twist, the Chinese repro drums are not tinny and thin; they are cast iron, and about 1/4" thick. If you look closely at the last two pics in the link, you can see that drum is a Chinese repro too. You cannot re-swage the Chinese drums because they will crack/break. Also note in those two pics, the new stud shoulder is sufficiently larger to support the thicker drum. Another twist, some Studebaker drums were not swaged centered on the hud, so the result is excess radial runout. A good machinist can, "adjust" the holes to reduce the runout to acceptable range, but it takes time and time is $. Better off (cheaper) to just buy the Chinese repro drums from our vendors (that's all they have now too), since they are already properly machined. In either case, to re-swage is not a good idea, and provides a benefit of easier brake access, as your link says.

              The Mopar link shows a bone head approach to removing the original swaged studs; after cutting the studs off, good luck pressing the (still braded) stud out of the hub without warping it. Just use a 5/8" quality (Lennox) hole saw. The 1/2" ID fits perfectly over the stud and keeps it centered, and will cut the swage off in about 30 seconds, but be sure to stop just past the drum's surface, maybe 1/32". After removal of the swage, the hub will fall out. You can then use the hole saw to remove any remaining shoulder down to even with the hub surface. Then it only takes a light press to push the old studs out, and new ones in.

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              • #8
                Is the Lenox hole saw you mention the type with teeth or the diamond dust cutting surface? The smallest tooth saw I can find is 3/4". I haven't tried online yet. -Jim

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by jrlemke View Post
                  Is the Lenox hole saw you mention the type with teeth or the diamond dust cutting surface? The smallest tooth saw I can find is 3/4". I haven't tried online yet. -Jim
                  check out these two links--- I just did a search "lennox 5/8 inch hole saw" and these are just a few of the options.

                  https://www.amazon.com/LENOX-Tools-B.../dp/B001D1GXCY
                  https://www.amazon.com/Lenox-Tools-1.../dp/B002TQ4UFO

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by 1953champcoupe View Post

                    check out these two links--- I just did a search "lennox 5/8 inch hole saw" and these are just a few of the options.

                    https://www.amazon.com/LENOX-Tools-B.../dp/B001D1GXCY
                    https://www.amazon.com/Lenox-Tools-1.../dp/B002TQ4UFO
                    I use the white one, in your first link.

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