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1950 Champion carpet / seat removal

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Studebaker Omaha View Post
    Not sure Skyway, but unfortunately it really gives me second thoughts about keeping the under-seat heater connected.
    Maybe the floor heater heated up the metal pan like a hot plate and burned the burlap and cotton insulation?
    In all the years I have been playing with Studebakers (49) and with all the thousands of Studebakers still out there, I have never heard of a case of the heater catching the seat on fire. You might just remove the charred pieces of Jute and just not worry about it.
    RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.


    10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
    4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
    5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon

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    • #17
      Those metal heat shields were also redesigned before the '53 models hit the market. Perhaps for that reason.
      Altering the shield in earlier models would be a simple operation.
      Brad Johnson,
      SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
      Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
      '33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight. '53 Commander Starlight
      '56 Sky Hawk in process

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      • #18
        Originally posted by RadioRoy View Post

        In all the years I have been playing with Studebakers (49) and with all the thousands of Studebakers still out there, I have never heard of a case of the heater catching the seat on fire. You might just remove the charred pieces of Jute and just not worry about it.
        With all due respect Roy probably the reason you have never heard of it because it it was probably determined to be a cigarette or electrical because the person looking at it wouldn't have known the difference. Friction is similar if not the same, a tire rubbing in a wheel well will eventually generate sufficient heat to pyrolyze paper or cardboard. The condition to ignition may not occur until the paper products have been converted to carbon and the ignition temperature lowered to a range that the tire rubbing can generate sufficient heat to cause ignition. The boxes may have been in the truck for weeks and the tire may have been rubbing for weeks until time was up and ignition occurred. The determined cause will be friction because that is what caused the ignition, however pyrolysis was the action that brought about ignition. Friction alone could cause a tire to ignite if it is allowed to continue but that is not pyrolysis, just friction.

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        • #19
          How much of that is just dirt and exhaust fumes and street level pollution that has been blown up under the seat? Some of those chemicals can be rather corrosive. No cabin air filters🙂

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          • #20
            A little more data: if Studebaker used jute or copra for stuffing, the autoignition temperature is up at 107C or about 225F.

            While the boiling point of water rises with system pressure (4 psig or 19 psia cooling/heating system?) this would be right at the same temperature: 225.2F!

            But with distance in air comes insulation. I find it very hard to believe that we’d have autoignition but yes, perhaps pyrolysis.

            That shield should have had been introduced much earlier and for sure should have had some refractory material on one of the sides.

            Not a smart design, South Bend.
            Last edited by NCDave51; 12-11-2020, 05:47 PM.

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            • #21
              One more condition of pyrolysis that is under our nose every day is bread in a toaster, the bread pyrolyzes to a point and is removed usually automatically, however if left to continue heating the bread will turn to carbon ie (burnt toast) and if left to further heating will ignite. Also birds build nests around light bulbs and frequently catch on fire, the ignition is the final phase of the pyrolysis process.

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              • #22
                How does dried fried mouse taste? I've never tried that "delicacy"

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                • #23
                  Mouse jerky?

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