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1960 259 factory valve specs too loose???

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  • Engine: 1960 259 factory valve specs too loose???

    Anyone out there running their 259 valve adjustment around .020 ???? Any opinions on this out there ? will this kill the valve train ???cause other concerns ???I just checked the adjustment on my new Lark and that is what it is set at and it see to run quiet and runs quite well.is it too tight ???

  • #2
    I will only say I have always set them to .026 cold. They are reasonably quiet at that setting. Way back when you adjusted valves because they were more “loose” due to slight wear of the various parts of the valve train. But, in my experience of the last 20 years or so I find valves that have tightened up due to valve seat recession. Of course it is not uniform. So a valve adjustment would consist of tightening some and loosening of others. Because of this I would not adjust them on the “tight” side,


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    • #3
      I see what you are saying on this and it does make sense! Thanks

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      • #4
        No. Unless one runs long, hard, fast, fully loaded, it's unlikely slightly tight valve settings will cause burnt exhaust valves.

        Yes, as mentioned, highway miles on today's fuel will cause valve seat recession. It depends upon the final drive ratio, tuneup, speeds and your horoscope, but checking the valve clearance every 5,000 miles would be a good use of time and effort.

        Maybe, tell us how you're driving the rig?

        jack viens

        PackardV8

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        • #5
          "Maybe, tell us how you're driving the rig?

          jack viens"


          Wow Jack, your Post says 4:39 PM, not AM, you can't fall asleep THIS early and forget how to spell your Own Name!
          StudeRich
          Second Generation Stude Driver,
          Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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          • #6
            Maybe the Covid Mask is interfering with Jack's typing finger, mine doe'sLOL. Luck Doofus

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            • #7
              Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
              "Maybe, tell us how you're driving the rig?

              jack viens"


              Wow Jack, your Post says 4:39 PM, not AM, you can't fall asleep THIS early and forget how to spell your Own Name!
              Who among us hasn't misspelled his own name a time or two? Go, ahead, admit it.

              -Dwite Fitzsimmons

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Dwight FitzSimons View Post

                Who among us hasn't misspelled his own name a time or two? Go, ahead, admit it.

                -Dwite Fitzsimmons
                I'm not sure about mine? But, back in 1966, I will be forever grateful to the Air Force duty roster clerk who misspelled my name on the guard duty sheet posted on the bulletin board. Also, indebted to my buddy, J. Clark, who unquestionably (and unknowingly for both of us) took care of that chore. That freed me up to work my part-time job at the Myrtle Beach resort area.

                Neither of us looked close enough at the service numbers next to our names to realize the mistake until after the tourist season was over in the fall. So, all summer, Jerry pulled his and my guard duty. Once we discovered the error, I think I served two nights of guard duty before we were sent to combat/survival school in Florida and after that, our entire outfit was relocated to Texas and no guard duty was required of our outfit out there.

                So...an occasional misspell can be a good thing depending on who is expecting what.
                John Clary
                Greer, SC

                SDC member since 1975

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                • #9
                  Maybe I am looking at this the wrong way, but if I have a quiet running 259, or 289 I don't touch it. When I did use a Studebaker as a daily driver as long as they were quiet, I was happy. Other than my first, I did not engage in stoplight grand prix. Just normal driving in town and overdrive on the highway. My 65 cruiser had the BW auto but it also had a 3.07 axle so driving on the highway was ok and usually in town I was not at the front of the giddy up and go.

                  First car was "overhauled" and after a few miles to break it in again, I adjusted the valves cold (16 years old at the time). After I did that, there was a slight click and I kept adjusting until it was quiet. I do remember the guy overhauling it did not replace the camshaft, even though one of the lobes had a sharp pointed edge rather than the rounded normal cam.

                  Bob Miles

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by 6hk71400 View Post
                    My 65 cruiser had the BW auto but it also had a 3.07 axle so driving on the highway was ok and usually in town I was not at the front of the giddy up and go.

                    Bob Miles
                    Your 65 Cruiser had hydraulic lifters.
                    RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

                    17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
                    10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
                    10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
                    4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
                    5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
                    56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
                    60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

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                    • #11
                      I have had this Lark on the road for two months , I think it has about 90,000 miles and I think it may be original on the engine but no real way to know that . Oil pressure is good , it does not smoke , and I drive it every day now about 15-20 miles , tranny needs reman so I baby it but once I am in top gear I do drive it around Tamp at 50-60 alot .This is a great little barn Find I saved with the help of the good Lord helping me track down the title owner's wife so I could keep it from the bone yard . Will never sell this Lark. Joe

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                      • #12
                        Roy, you are right, I just neglected to mention that. However, they were a good indicator if I had low oil pressure.

                        Bob Miles

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