Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Timing 259 Engine

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Ignition: Timing 259 Engine

    When setting the timing on the 259 engine, where specifically should the marker point to on the harmonic balancer?

  • #2


    As stated in the shop manual (you do have one don't you?) "......the index mark nearest the IGN mark to be directly under the pointer."
    Last edited by rbisacca; 10-29-2020, 08:26 AM.

    Comment


    • #3
      There's never enough eyes on the tech page. Why make this difficult? This is the only Studebaker site that chastises folks for wanting to stay engaged in the Studebaker hobby. Rules Rules Rules. Are you wondering why most have left this site? Most of the new owners don't even look for this site.
      sals54

      Comment


      • #4
        And, by the way, I don't even use the timing marks. I haven't for decades. I do all the adjustments to valves, plugs, points etc. Then warm up the engine to normal operating temperature. I then run the screw on the carb up to about 2200 rpms and let it sit there for a few seconds. Then very slowly rotate the distributor to the right till it slightly stumbles, then to the left. Find the middle and tweak it until you get that sweet sound. Return idle to normal. I don't even own a timing light. But I've only been doing this for 50 years, so what the heck do I know?
        sals54

        Comment


        • #5
          Sals54, that's what I also do.
          Once I worked on a gas station & next door was a garage & a woman had left her VW bug there & complained to me about their prices for adjusting the timing & I told her how easy I did it & the garage boss heard me & said "we do it the quality way".
          sigpic

          Josephine
          -55
          Champion V8
          4d sedan

          Comment


          • #6
            I do it by ear also ,55 years of it but the only difference is I will stab the throttle a couple times and listen for stumble or a slight pop, if nothing, your good to go.

            Comment


            • #7
              Isn't it nice to make an inquiry and learn something new. Setting the timing without the light sounds fascinating; I will try. Yes I do have a shop manual but by asking the question...just look what we come up with! Just great information.

              Comment


              • #8
                I use a vacuum gauge to set timing. Easy to find the sweet spot and has never failed me although I get a lot of heat from timing light purists that say I'm going to damage the engine somehow. No problems yet.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by jetboat View Post
                  I do it by ear also ,55 years of it but the only difference is I will stab the throttle a couple times and listen for stumble or a slight pop, if nothing, your good to go.
                  Yeah. That's the final step. If I ever get a stumble like that, I give it a little advance. I like to tune it to how I drive it. Not how the book thinks everyone will drive it. Gotta remember that automotive engineers are always held back by the bean counters and the sales executives. The cars must work for the masses. I'm usually leaving the masses in my dust.
                  sals54

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I think those of us who view dwell meters and timing lights with disdain have not yet done battle with softly hissing vacuum advance canisters, worn distributor bushings, sticky neglected centrifugal advance mechanisms, or felt the before and after difference a nice centrifugal advance curve WILL make.

                    "when you cannot measure it, when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meager and unsatisfactory kind:"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Per the above notes (Sal)...if you set the timing per the "book"... The engine will lack power and milage.

                      If you do it more by "ear", you will be putting more initial timing into the ignition. The engine will be happier for it. It will produce more power and better mileage.
                      Just be sure to listen for detonation while under a load. If you hear the pinging, just back off the distributor (retard) the tiniest amount, until the pinging is gone.
                      After a bit, this will become second nature.

                      Mike

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        OK guys, by ear is how I do it too, but with this 55 and it's DG 250 transmission and the warnings (and fear) of it locking up the torque converter at "higher" rpm, I only did mine at idle. It helped to move the distributor a bit, but would you suggest how I might do it at the higher rpm (usually 2000 to 2500 rpm) like I've always done my other cars? I've thought about supporting the rear end in the air and doing it , but that gives me a "Yikes" feeling too, ha !

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          You don't need to time it at that rpm speed. If you time it at about 900 rpm the vacuum advance will take care of the proper timing at 2500 rpm.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X