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why can't i just get larger diameter tires instead of changing gears 60 lark with a 3.73?

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  • BILT4ME
    replied
    Originally posted by jackb View Post
    without installing new front coil springs, you'd be rubbing against the fender lips with 205's.
    I ran about 4000 miles with my new 205's and the original springs. I had no rubbing and I am a spirited driver. I did finally install new springs, shocks, and bushings, and the car drives much better, but I never experienced any rubbing with the 205's.

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  • mw2013
    replied
    Originally posted by jackb View Post
    without installing new front coil springs, you'd be rubbing against the fender lips with 205's.
    they installed new springs as part of the reconditioning .. and what size and back space rim are you talking?

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  • jackb
    replied
    without installing new front coil springs, you'd be rubbing against the fender lips with 205's.

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  • RadioRoy
    replied
    I broke a tapered axle going down a winding mountain road that is a main thoroughfare. No way to stop or slow down - just steer. It was quite exciting to say the least.

    If you end up putting larger tires on the rear only, don't forget to aim the headlights.

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  • mw2013
    replied
    Originally posted by studegary View Post

    The flanged axle keeps the rear wheel from going off on its own when an axle breaks.
    It is not so much the ratio, but rather the fact that it is a flanged axle that makes it worth something.
    for street use, have you heard of axles breaking? did GM, Ford, Mopar, AMC use this stuff?

    are there different dia. i.e spline counts offered by stude even with the same Dana 44? I would think a thicker axle would negate the need for flanges, albeit heavier, am I wrong?

    stude never made any wild trans am racers in the late 60's they missed those fun years, and with an R3 avanti 300 horses and idk what torque, the transmission would go first before an axle right?

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  • studegary
    replied
    Originally posted by mw2013 View Post
    do i really need flange axles? what are they and what do they do for normal street driving not racing?

    I have to try to sell it, I am in CA and it's in WI, is it worth $250? he is sitting on 2 other 3.75 d44 already, i may give him a commission to sell it 50%? i'll be lucky if i ever see it tho
    The flanged axle keeps the rear wheel from going off on its own when an axle breaks.
    It is not so much the ratio, but rather the fact that it is a flanged axle that makes it worth something.

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  • mw2013
    replied
    Originally posted by Buzzard View Post
    Mason,
    Here is my '59 HT with 215/70r15 on 15x7 Chryco Cop Car wheels. Click image for larger version

Name:	793.JPG
Views:	253
Size:	133.0 KB
ID:	1862265 They are available from Wheel Vintiques.
    i found this online and it's got a 4" back space

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  • mw2013
    replied
    Originally posted by studegary View Post

    I would go for that conversion and put the flanged axle conversion in later. What do you get for the good flanged axle differential being removed?
    do i really need flange axles? what are they and what do they do for normal street driving not racing?

    I have to try to sell it, I am in CA and it's in WI, is it worth $250? he is sitting on 2 other 3.75 d44 already, i may give him a commission to sell it 50%? i'll be lucky if i ever see it tho

    Leave a comment:


  • studegary
    replied
    Originally posted by mw2013 View Post

    I just got off the phone with the seller, he went to go see an engine for his 48 and the guy had 2 d44 3.31 twin traction, $250. and $250 to put it in, i may go for it, I get positraction and lose the flanged axles, is that a good compromise?
    I would go for that conversion and put the flanged axle conversion in later. What do you get for the good flanged axle differential being removed?

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  • mw2013
    replied
    Originally posted by Studebakercenteroforegon View Post
    I think that you are overthinking your issue. First of all, swapping ring gears shouldn’t cost anything like $750 - $1400.00.
    Maybe because up here in the Northwest, there are lots of shops that specialize in Jeeps and other 4 wheel drive vehicles. They are totally familiar with Type 44 rear ends and work on them regularly.
    But, even better, it is so easy to swap an entire rear axle assembly out of a Studebaker and good used assemblies should be available. Get a 3.31 or a 3.07 for instance. And don’t tell yourself you need Twin Traction because you don’t. You can make this swap in a couple of hours and a good used Rear end might be $100.00 - $250.00 or so. Get connected with your local club members for parts leads.
    I just got off the phone with the seller, he went to go see an engine for his 48 and the guy had 2 d44 3.31 twin traction, $250. and $250 to put it in, i may go for it, I get positraction and lose the flanged axles, is that a good compromise?

    Leave a comment:


  • StudeRich
    replied
    The Overhead Valve 170 Sixes in '61 to '64 Models that have Direct Transmissions, all run 3.73 to 1 Rear Gears, and absolutely CAN NOT run at above 55-60 MPH or Higher than 3000 to 3500 for long before the Excessive HEAT Happens, THAT is what cracks the Heads. TOO many RPM's = Too much HEAT.

    Not relevant to this String about V8's however.

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  • Ross
    replied
    That's my point. The six will run at relatively high revs with no problems, how much more the shorter stroke v8s. As an aside, it seems low speed driving under load that makes the six head crack. It seems there is a flow problem that allows hot spots. The factory "cure" or at least alleviation was a smaller pulley on the water pump on the '64 models. But I digress.

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  • studegary
    replied
    There is little to no comparison between the Studebaker six cylinder engines and Studebaker V8s as far as strength and longevity.

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  • mw2013
    replied
    Originally posted by BILT4ME View Post
    City driving, I always shift to low for starts. I am a spirited driver and no, it will NOT spin the tires on pavement.

    It is "comfortable" driving on the interstate at 70 MPH and is about 3100 RPM IIRC. Yes, at 100 MPH, it's about 4400 RPM. Mine runs out of oomph at that speed.

    One of the Dana 27's I had in was a 4.56 and I could smoke the tires, but I was done at 55 MPH. Intersection to intersection in a small town was fun.

    I ran 3.73 for a while and it had great torque and off- the line, but too much RPM at highway speed and that's when it was 55 MPH.

    I have been focusing on getting it back to "stock" configuration, as my original had 3.31 rear gears.
    Yes these tires are slightly taller, but the next comparable size is much smaller. This combo allows it to be comfortable on the interstate.

    Start with the factory configuration, figure out your final drive ratio, then adjust for what you have added. There will still be some "feel" that you may or may not like.

    I personally think 3.07 will be too tall for city driving. Yes, you can modify your transmission to be an first-gear start, but you will also lose the push-start possibility. I happen to like it and don't want to mess with that part.

    Realize that there are limited "performance" parts for Studes, as their equipment was either their own or just enough different that it wouldn't cross over. The typical Stude owner was NOT a performance minded individual, as these were the less expensive of the autos on the market at the time. Yes, there were a few performance options or cars, but most of those were reserved for the Avantis, at least in how you may be looking at them today.

    There are few guys here that have seriously hot-rodded their actual Stude stuff, but it doesn't come cheap unless you have the tooling and time.

    Track down a Factory Service Manual for the Stude and supplement that with a Motor brand service manual dated 1965, as that will have the specs you are looking for and you can find cross-over year info for Studes as well as other makes. If you want much better performance, consider a Paxton supercharger, but those parts are not cheap or easy to find.
    no performance here, no 100 mph driving here, maybe 85 tops, it's got 3.73 in it now, it think taller tires is an easy compromise

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  • mw2013
    replied
    Originally posted by Ross View Post
    I've driven something like 50K miles in a car with 3.73 including a trip from MD to CO and MD to UT running 65 to occasionally 75. That would be 3500 rpm at 75. Dude, like what is the problem? These engines are not made out of cotton candy. If you are going to commute in it, then change the axle, but if it is for weekend wahoo then just drive it.

    When I freshened up the engine at 95K with some new rings and valve seals the bearings etc were all beautiful. And that in an engine with a 4" stroke. Turn the radio up louder and just drive the thing.
    thank you , for telling me this, you use your stude, and that is a lot of long road trips, ( what kind of stude is it)was not sure what rpm it would be at 3500 rpm is doable, i read the 6cyl would crack heads doing running at 60mph

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