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Champion / Lark - 170-6 Oil Pan Gasket installation

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  • Engine: Champion / Lark - 170-6 Oil Pan Gasket installation

    Installing a new oil pan gasket set for my 59 Lark with the 170-6.

    The long side paper-composite pieces are self-explanatory, but I'm wanting to see what others have done for the two (2) cork sections.

    In particular, the thick square-cross-section piece at the rear of the engine seems to remain a bit short when testing fitting into the arc at the rear crank/bearing. The arcs at both the front and rear of the pan also have a male ridge stamped in, not a female arc.

    How have you held the cork in place as you fit the pan to the block?

    Not quite sure how to proceed. Thanks in advance for your advice.

    David

  • #2
    I believe the Six has a deep groove in the Rear Main Bearing Cap to install the Rear Arch Gasket into like the V8's do.
    When oriented correctly, the almost Square, Rear Arch Gasket has an angle cut to make it fit squarely to the block.

    I can see how you would have a problem if you got a Set with TWO Front Arch Gaskets and NO Rear!

    If you are working without the '59-'64 Chassis Parts Catalog and the Shop Manual THAT will be your biggest problem.
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner

    Comment


    • #3
      Yes, I have the correct rear (square) and front (flat) cork gaskets from S-I.

      Yes, I also have the 59-64 manuals, but the instructions speak more to the removal/installation of the front filler block to pinch down the ends of the side gaskets than anything else. Nothing about the arches per se.

      This truly was a poor design by Studebaker compared to the peers of the day.

      Please keep the suggestions coming, all.

      D

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      • #4
        A “poor” design that works just fine when installed correctly....

        Comment


        • #5
          Put the two tiny square gasket pieces into the base of the arch at the rear bearing cap. Then install your two side gaskets on the block. Use some glue if you are working in the car. Next is the front filler block as per the manual. The front filler strip should be "too long" so I glue it in place at two points at the side of the filler block and let it stand proud in the middle. The rear filler strip must also be "too long" for the bearing cap. I usually grind a small chamfer on two edges so it will slip into the groove on the cap better and glue its ends into the groove . It will also stand proud at the center if it is the right length. Just before slipping the pan on I paint the two arches with Indian Head sealer. This helps the pan slide over and compress the fillers. It may sound like overkill, but I torque the pan bolts to get a nice even joint.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by NCDave51 View Post
            /Cut/This truly was a poor design by Studebaker compared to the peers of the day./Cut/D
            Yeah, most of those "Peers" had a Piece of Rope for a Main Seal as well.
            The Studebaker Brummer Neoprene Main Seal was ahead of it's time.
            StudeRich
            Second Generation Stude Driver,
            Proud '54 Starliner Owner

            Comment


            • #7
              You can help form the cork gasket by clamping it in the pan over night, even if it is close in line you can start the assembly with extra long bolts in the four corners. As you gradually bring it up you can adjust the cork as necessary to assure it's position. As the pan comes up into position you can start the regular bolts and replace the long corner bolts. Don't be in a hurry, there is no more sinking feeling than an annoying leak after all the work. Before assembly assure the pan is flat check all the bolt holes if a PO has over tightened the pan the holes may be damaged. They can be repaired with a small steel block under the rail and a tap with a small hammer.

              Comment


              • #8
                50 or so years ago Fel-Pro brand gaskets used to pack the rear cork piece in a piece of cardboard tube cut to about 1/4” thick. This formed it to a “U” shape so it was a good head start to installing it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks all - some really great detail in these responses that the OEM manual clearly omitted.

                  Much appreciated. Engine is out on stand, so I can go slow, fit and refit, etc.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Final comments: in error I assumed the boss at the rear of the engine was metal - looking up and closer I now realize it was the hardened cork after years of service. This now makes sense WHERE the square cork section fits into place!

                    Same thing at the front. Residues of the old “flat” cork were preventing the new one from fully entering the filler piece groove when trial-fit. Mad at my oversight....sorry I didn’t put 2 and 2 together.

                    Q: When I remove the (semi-circular) filler piece as the Manual describes to capture the wings of the side gaskets, have folks cemented the flat gasket onto the piece off the engine so it’s ready to go?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      If you mean that you cut off the bottom portion of a Front Plate Gasket to go next to the Filler Block, then YES goop it up and replace the Old one.
                      StudeRich
                      Second Generation Stude Driver,
                      Proud '54 Starliner Owner

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        What I started doing is soaking those end pieces in water and then bending them into a curve and holding them with a rubber band until they dry. If you could form them around the right size circle it would be even better. Couldn't believe how much easier it was to keep them in place.

                        Roger List
                        Roger W. List
                        Proud Studebaker Owner

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Altair’s suggestions of using longer bolts was one of the best suggestions. I only had a few 5/16” NC bolts on hand but every little bit of extra “gap” helped.

                          Now thankfully over, I have to say this was truly the worst job I have encountered on the Lark. Honestly how on earth did the assembly line accomplish this with any reasonable speed. I can only think they used pre-curved cork sections or simply arcs of cork to keep them in their place, and/or they did this with the block upside down. The side pieces were fine but the ends were a real trick.

                          Like my dad before me, I’ve always used “aircraft sealant”, a sticky mixture of pine pitch and polymers and evaporants that holds the gaskets in place but allows for repositioning for a good while. Permatex still makes it and oReillys sells it. By the end of the job, however, the bottom the engine looked like a molasses can exploded nearby.

                          Happy to put this one behind me.
                          Last edited by NCDave51; 10-11-2020, 12:57 PM.

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                          • #14
                            I cheated and used silicone on mine. Lots of it. Nobody can see and it does not leak but I hope I never have to do it again.
                            _______________
                            http://stude.vonadatech.com
                            https://jeepster.vonadatech.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by NCDave51 View Post
                              Honestly how on earth did the assembly line accomplish this with any reasonable speed. I can only think they used pre-curved cork sections or simply arcs of cork to keep them in their place, and/or they did this with the block upside down.
                              I wouldn’t attempt to reseal a Stude engine unless it was upside down.



                              Click image for larger version  Name:	0E7C8922-D6DD-4209-8146-D19B0F95FC89.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	105.1 KB ID:	1860622
                              Last edited by mbstude; 10-12-2020, 02:01 PM.

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