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How to hot run a Studebaker V8 set up for automatic transmission ??

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  • Engine: How to hot run a Studebaker V8 set up for automatic transmission ??

    We've built a Studebaker V8 we want to hot run to check out before we ship it.

    With a standard transmission build, this would be no problem, just bolt on the flywheel, bell housing and starter.

    However, the automatic transmission is a different deal. The starter ring gear is on the torque converter, so there would have to be a complete automatic transmission, filled with fluid, bolted onto the back of the engine. That's a huge hassle we'd prefer to avoid. (Plus, the bell housing should be dial indicated as well.)

    The crankshaft bolts used for the automatic are too short to bolt on a flywheel. I know it's possible to booger up a flywheel by countersinking the bolt holes enough so the auto bolts can be used, but not the way we'd prefer to do things; although it may come to that.

    Suggestions? Ideas?

    jack vines
    PackardV8

  • #2
    Even if you could air start it you wouldn't want to run it without a flywheel or converter attached. You'll just about have to do that with a flywheel, and then save it for that purpose only. And a bellhousing, or part of one. (All old VW mechanics have a sawed-off part of a transmission bell housing to mount a starter for running on the bench or engine stand).
    AL SORAN RACING

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    • #3
      Just take the ugliest, rustiest, nastiest flywheel you've got... and sacrifice it to the Studebaker gods of restoration. They'll understand. And you'll have one for any future needs.
      sals54

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      • #4
        I have been running one of those, "buggered up" flywheels in the 62GT for over 300,000 miles now. Pretty sure it could be placed into service later, if ever the need arose. Another idea, use the longer crank flange bolts for a standard transmission. Pretty sue the extra 1/4" would not interfere with the FOM flex plate or TC later. But you could easily cut 1/4" off of those flange bolts after the run in to make them, "correct" for FOM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by JoeHall View Post
          Another idea, use the longer crank flange bolts for a standard transmission. Pretty sue the extra 1/4" would not interfere with the FOM flex plate or TC later.
          Thanks, Joe. This one is already together and the pan is sealed tight. Next build, we'll try to remember to check if that's the case. It would be unlike Studebaker to stock two lengths of bolts if the longer would serve both, but could happen.

          jack vines
          PackardV8

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          • #6
            Hand crank it.
            Bez Auto Alchemy
            573-318-8948
            http://bezautoalchemy.com


            "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

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            • #7
              You almost need the fly wheel. Because with just a flex plate it won't want to idle right either. Set yourself up a run stand maybe and have a fly wheel cut down so the shorter blots will work and if your doing a standard engine you could use the right thickness washer.

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              • #8
                Jack -

                Since you are basically in the business of building Stude engines...fork over some money...

                1. Get one of the Stude to Chevy trans. conversion kits (yea...a few bucks). And you may need to add some support to stiffen the plate to simulate a bellhousing stiffness.

                2. Bolt it to the engine. Now, you have a location for the starter (Ford). AND...a rear mount for your engine stand if you wish.

                3. Bolt a flywheel to the crank. Yes, shim/spacers will be required (or do I have this backward ?). Now, you have a ring gear. If I'm thinking backward, counterbore the the hole locations so the crank bolts stick thru far enough for nuts.

                4. Attach a set of battery cables and a battery, with switch, and off you go.

                Or...what am I missing.

                Mike

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
                  Thanks, Joe. This one is already together and the pan is sealed tight. Next build, we'll try to remember to check if that's the case. It would be unlike Studebaker to stock two lengths of bolts if the longer would serve both, but could happen.

                  jack vines
                  In the late '60s I installed a new R3 engine in my '64 Avanti with A/T. I had ordered the engine with the longer bolts for a manual trans. not knowing what I would put the engine into. We just ground some off all the bolts, although I can't recall just how we determined that we had to shorten them and by how much. This doesn't solve your issue; just thought I would mention this experience.
                  --Dwight

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                  • #10

                    I use the Mike method minus the switch..

                    Originally posted by Mike Van Veghten View Post

                    1. Get one of the Stude to Chevy trans. conversion kits (yea...a few bucks). And you may need to add some support to stiffen the plate to simulate a bellhousing stiffness.
                    .....

                    4. Attach a set of battery cables and a battery, with switch, and off you go.

                    Mike
                    Click on video, and yes! Turn up the volume...


                    IMG_4993 by s blazel, on Flickr

                    IMG_4992 by s blazel, on Flickr
                    Last edited by SScopelli; 10-07-2020, 09:29 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Awesome sounding Avanti Sebastian, I love the sound of that thing idling through open Exhaust!
                      StudeRich
                      Second Generation Stude Driver,
                      Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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                      • #12
                        Hi Jack. I got one set up and running now. Short bolts for auto. Being it was a test run and not going into a car. I installed a fly wheel with out lock washers. Bolted on a bell housing and starter and fired it up. This is ok for a test stand only and not for installing into a car.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by DieselJim View Post
                          Hi Jack. I got one set up and running now. Short bolts for auto. Being it was a test run and not going into a car. I installed a fly wheel with out lock washers. Bolted on a bell housing and starter and fired it up. This is ok for a test stand only and not for installing into a car.
                          Thanks, Jim. We'll give it a try.

                          jack vines
                          PackardV8

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
                            We've built a Studebaker V8 we want to hot run to check out before we ship it.

                            With a standard transmission build, this would be no problem, just bolt on the flywheel, bell housing and starter.

                            However, the automatic transmission is a different deal. The starter ring gear is on the torque converter, so there would have to be a complete automatic transmission, filled with fluid, bolted onto the back of the engine. That's a huge hassle we'd prefer to avoid. (Plus, the bell housing should be dial indicated as well.)

                            The crankshaft bolts used for the automatic are too short to bolt on a flywheel. I know it's possible to booger up a flywheel by countersinking the bolt holes enough so the auto bolts can be used, but not the way we'd prefer to do things; although it may come to that.

                            Suggestions? Ideas?

                            jack vines
                            Jack, when I was 18 I bolted a standard trans flywheel to a used 289 with short flex plate bolts. I did not modify the flywheel. I used the stock lock nuts. I drove that car all winter (about 10K miles) before taking it apart for a new engine. It was not a good idea but it worked. I would not hesitate to do it for a simple hot start and run in situation.
                            james r pepper

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                            • #15
                              If "making" a flywheel for this purpose, once could use a countersink on the bolt holes, and then cut a 45-degree bevel on a set of nuts. That should give enough thread engagement for the purpose.
                              Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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