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Temperature Change and resulting Sweats of vehicle

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  • buddymander
    replied
    Plastic on the floor won't help. That's just another non-absorbent surface; like concrete. Carpet over the concrete would be a whole lot better. The wood I suggested would be a non-condensing surface too. You see, the problem is caused by non-absorbent surfaces combined with pro-condensing surfaces. Moisture condenses on the non-absorbent surfaces and is allowed to just sit there under your truck until it evaporates from its puddles and rises up in the form of vapor and then condenses once again on your truck's cold steel pro-condensing body panels. And there it sits protected from evaporation by the car cover, which gives it plenty of time to eat your truck.

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  • rodnutrandy
    replied
    I appreciate all the ideas and everyone taking time to help! I think I will fight it this winter with plastic on floor . look for old carpet ,and cover truck ,during summer will come up with better protection for future, Thanks Everyone !

    Randy Wilkin
    1946 M5 Streetrod
    Hillsboro,Ohio 45133

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  • jmccarrol@hotmail.com
    replied
    I'm up north in Canada where the temp stays just below freezing till spring, so my conditions may not be the same. However, I have put tarps on the floor to insulate the car from from contact with the floor. I have also used cardboard with great results. Cheap, but your issues are slightly different.

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  • JBOYLE
    replied
    Here's another firm that does the bubbles...there are clear and look neat.
    They also make an non-transparent outdoor unit.

    http://www.carcoon.com

    I'm thinking of geetting one for my other car just to keep the dust off and control humidity to the wood wheels.


    63 Avanti R1 2788
    1914 Stutz Bearcat
    (George Barris replica)

    Washington State

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  • jclary
    replied

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  • 55s
    replied
    It depends.

    Of course, colder air cannot hold as much water, therefore sweats.

    Heat, bags, vents, dessicants and other stuff should help. There are some really good suggestions by everyone in this thread - some expensive and some maybe not as much. How about a simple enclosed framework of 2x2s, covered with plastic, and a dehumidifier inside?

    I would check blankets & sheets daily for moisture.

    I have seen paint and bodywork damage that I think was caused by wet blankets. My understanding is that paint forms a lattice-like cover on metal. Therefore metal is never completely protected with just paint. Leaving water there, unable to dry immediately, may be worse for the finish.

    Water by itself that can dry can't be too bad for cars, because the most rust free cars are on the west coast where there is lots of rain - but I presume there are dry out periods between.

    I still have not spent a lot of time trying to solve the problem. If I could get a CASO ground source heating sytem for everything (house & Barn), then I would be able to solve my sweat problem.

    Paul

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  • rodnutrandy
    replied
    Ok, here we go again 57 degrees on Jan. 4th. Of course truck swet. I moved truck out ,dried it best I could, put plastic on concrete, pulled truck up over plastic, put first sheets, than blankets over truck . Will this help or just trap moisture? Thanks for all the help!

    Randy Wilkin
    1946 M5 Streetrod
    Hillsboro,Ohio 45133

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  • nvonada
    replied
    Randy,
    I had the same problem (Delaware, OH). I have light car cover over the car but the cold metal just condensed the moisture all over the car. I figured the best solution was to warm up the car so the dog and I went for a drive. Dry as a bone when we got back!

    Nathan

    _______________
    http://stude.vonadatech.com

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  • buddymander
    replied
    Buy five sheets of 4 X 8 stranboard 7/16" ($40) and run your truck up on them. Cover the truck with an insulated waterproof cover.

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  • Transtar60
    replied
    I use a 92,000 BTU 93% efficient LP gas furnace in my garage.
    It has a sealed combustion air system, IE draws air from outside and exhausts outside too, so it doesnt draw any gasoline fumes or other stuff into the combustion chamber(or light the garage on fire).
    My garage is a Blitz built metal pole type building, with the aluminum insulation. One occasion when the igniter was out, we had the up and down weather and the ceiling did have condensation dripping from onto the cars and everything else. I keep a spare igniter on hand now just in case.
    Havent needed it for seven years.


    3E38
    4E2
    4E28
    5E13
    7E7
    8E7
    8E12
    8E28

    59 Lark
    etc

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  • warrlaw1
    replied
    Kitty Litter, Oh Oh... My buddy did a re and re trans job on a Chrysler K-car in his drive way. Used Kitty litter to soak up the juices. He was under there one day and came up smelling like a port-o-potty. Every cat in the neighbourhood was making a contribution in his drive way. ????

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  • 55s
    replied
    I also have the same problem, as I'm sure many do.

    Insulation and heat is one good cure.

    Yet many good cars appear out of old barns - the difference, I am almost certain, is the presence of lots of wood to "buffer" the dampness. Wood seems to absorb excess humidity faster than car metal, and release it slowly. It also adds humidity in the summer when it could be drier. I have both metal and wood barns. The metal ones sweat profusely, and the ones with lots of wood do not.

    It also appears that humidity can come up through poured concrete, however, that can controlled somewhat with better sealers, paints, and lots of old carpet. (Yes, recycle your neighbour's old carpet under your car. Remove if damp. It also keeps your feet warm.

    I'm also thinking a dessicant in large quantities may work. Has anyone tried lots of kitty litter or baking soda or ???? Surely this stuff would trap excess mointure and release it slowly too. (or it can be removed). Mechanically, wind-powered air vents/turbines on the roof can vent out excess humidity as well.

    Paul

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  • Skip Lackie
    replied
    I think the bubble may be your only really effective option. I encountered the same problem when I had my vehicles stored in an uninsulated steel building. Although it had a concrete floor, the temperature and humidity swings in the winter caused everything to sweat. Unfortunately, in the rust belt, warm weather in the winter is usually accompanied by high humidity. That means lots of sweating. Even though you can protect much of the car with rust-proofing, you can't do much for the engine, trans and rear axle, which stay cold for a long time. In one extreme case, my engines all sweated enough to create little puddles on the garage floor. I got rust on all kinds of weird places, like spark plugs, fuel lines, etc. And like you, I was sure water was collecting in places I couldn't see.

    I finally bit the bullet and insulated the building. Problem solved (at considerable expense).

    Skip Lackie
    Washington DC

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  • rodnutrandy
    replied
    truck is as rust proofed as I could get it. Still feel some areas I might not have reached. Today hit near a record high (hi 60's). Tonight will be in 30's. Moved truck to basement of home where temp stays about 55 degrees year round. Moved my 2001 Grand Cherokee outside for time being. (147,000 miles on it). feel this is best I can do for truck and jeep will have to be happy in polebarn when needed.

    Randy Wilkin
    1946 M5 Streetrod
    Hillsboro,Ohio 45133

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  • warrlaw1
    replied
    Well, would it ruin the effect to have the car "rust-proofed"? There's a simple spray called "OIL-Tech" that I have used on 400,000 milers. It creeps into seams and is less oil than waxy. Leaves a dry wax-like coating. My '92 Legend Coupe gets a respray every year for about $100. My 55 K-code is in primer, but I intend to give it the same treatment, even if it doesn't see a winter. Would I lose points for being non-original?

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