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Temperature Change and resulting Sweats of vehicle

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  • #16
    Buy five sheets of 4 X 8 stranboard 7/16" ($40) and run your truck up on them. Cover the truck with an insulated waterproof cover.

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    • #17
      Randy,
      I had the same problem (Delaware, OH). I have light car cover over the car but the cold metal just condensed the moisture all over the car. I figured the best solution was to warm up the car so the dog and I went for a drive. Dry as a bone when we got back!

      Nathan

      _______________
      http://stude.vonadatech.com
      _______________
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      https://jeepster.vonadatech.com

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      • #18
        Ok, here we go again 57 degrees on Jan. 4th. Of course truck swet. I moved truck out ,dried it best I could, put plastic on concrete, pulled truck up over plastic, put first sheets, than blankets over truck . Will this help or just trap moisture? Thanks for all the help!

        Randy Wilkin
        1946 M5 Streetrod
        Hillsboro,Ohio 45133
        Randy Wilkin
        1946 M5 Streetrod
        Hillsboro,Ohio 45133

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        • #19
          It depends.

          Of course, colder air cannot hold as much water, therefore sweats.

          Heat, bags, vents, dessicants and other stuff should help. There are some really good suggestions by everyone in this thread - some expensive and some maybe not as much. How about a simple enclosed framework of 2x2s, covered with plastic, and a dehumidifier inside?

          I would check blankets & sheets daily for moisture.

          I have seen paint and bodywork damage that I think was caused by wet blankets. My understanding is that paint forms a lattice-like cover on metal. Therefore metal is never completely protected with just paint. Leaving water there, unable to dry immediately, may be worse for the finish.

          Water by itself that can dry can't be too bad for cars, because the most rust free cars are on the west coast where there is lots of rain - but I presume there are dry out periods between.

          I still have not spent a lot of time trying to solve the problem. If I could get a CASO ground source heating sytem for everything (house & Barn), then I would be able to solve my sweat problem.

          Paul

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          • #20
            John Clary
            Greer, SC

            SDC member since 1975

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            • #21
              Here's another firm that does the bubbles...there are clear and look neat.
              They also make an non-transparent outdoor unit.

              http://www.carcoon.com

              I'm thinking of geetting one for my other car just to keep the dust off and control humidity to the wood wheels.


              63 Avanti R1 2788
              1914 Stutz Bearcat
              (George Barris replica)

              Washington State
              63 Avanti R1 2788
              1914 Stutz Bearcat
              (George Barris replica)

              Washington State

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              • #22
                I'm up north in Canada where the temp stays just below freezing till spring, so my conditions may not be the same. However, I have put tarps on the floor to insulate the car from from contact with the floor. I have also used cardboard with great results. Cheap, but your issues are slightly different.

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                • #23
                  I appreciate all the ideas and everyone taking time to help! I think I will fight it this winter with plastic on floor . look for old carpet ,and cover truck ,during summer will come up with better protection for future, Thanks Everyone !

                  Randy Wilkin
                  1946 M5 Streetrod
                  Hillsboro,Ohio 45133
                  Randy Wilkin
                  1946 M5 Streetrod
                  Hillsboro,Ohio 45133

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                  • #24
                    Plastic on the floor won't help. That's just another non-absorbent surface; like concrete. Carpet over the concrete would be a whole lot better. The wood I suggested would be a non-condensing surface too. You see, the problem is caused by non-absorbent surfaces combined with pro-condensing surfaces. Moisture condenses on the non-absorbent surfaces and is allowed to just sit there under your truck until it evaporates from its puddles and rises up in the form of vapor and then condenses once again on your truck's cold steel pro-condensing body panels. And there it sits protected from evaporation by the car cover, which gives it plenty of time to eat your truck.

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