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  • Temperature Change and resulting Sweats of vehicle

    Ok, a wierd topic. I live in the rust belt (SW Ohio) , yesterday the temp went from 30 degrees to 64 degrees in about an hour ,than back to 30s . My truck sets in a pole barn with concrete floor and pressboard walls inside. Water was running off the truck everywhere. I hate to see this, it causes water in places you could never protect in buildup. feel truck is rusting down in place. Is their a way to protect truck without spending a fortune. Any help appreciated. Randy

    Randy Wilkin
    1946 M5 Streetrod
    Hillsboro,Ohio 45133
    Randy Wilkin
    1946 M5 Streetrod
    Hillsboro,Ohio 45133

  • #2
    One expensive solution is to buy an auto storage bubble. You can seal your truck into this bubble, turn on the electic blower to inflate it, and it will stay at one temperature, dry as a bone.

    Here's a link - http://www.carcapsule.com/

    I know a fellow with an expensive custom Chevy who keeps it stored whenever it's not in the trailer or being shown.

    Chris Pile
    Midway Chapter SDC
    The Studebaker Special
    The only difference between death and taxes is that death does not grow worse every time Congress convenes. - Will Rogers

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    • #3
      It would help a lot to put a sheet of heavy plastic over that concrete floor. A lot of sweat comes up from there.

      Oglesby,Il.
      Anybody that drives faster than me is a maniac.Anybody that drives slower than me is an idiot.
      Oglesby,Il.

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      • #4
        Randy

        First off - Nice Truck []

        The auto storage bubble seems like a fine idea.

        I could be flippent and say things like: Heat the garage, Move to Arizona, etc. but that's not your question.

        When you cool 64 deg air to 30 deg. you will get condensation, that's why they put drains on air conditioners. The plastic on the floor will reduce moisture from the concrete but not stop the condensation from the air.

        A heavy car cover will help because it will insulate the vehicle surface but won't stop condensation completely. Certainly won't stop condensation underneath.

        For your problem, I'd recommend the cover and a good fan to move the air around and under the vehicle to reduce condensation and speed evaporation, unless you want to invest in the bag.

        Bob

        PS- Condensation is not much of a problem in Michigan currently, it laying outside in drifts



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        • #5
          thanks for the ideas . Want to do something, I had a 70 440 6pk Cuda (before they were valuable) that set in a garage that swet a lot and it needed new door panels when it was about 4 years old. Want truck to last a long time . would be upset if truck lasted this long without me and when down the tubes after being brought from Kansas to Ohio.

          Randy Wilkin
          1946 M5 Streetrod
          Hillsboro,Ohio 45133
          Randy Wilkin
          1946 M5 Streetrod
          Hillsboro,Ohio 45133

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          • #6
            Since I live in an area where 10-20% is average humidity, I don't know about much about atmospheric sweating, but is this an idea? Get a dehumidifier that doesn't do anything about temperature so the energy consumption is as little as possible. Dehumidify the air to reduce the condensation on the metal.

            '50 Champion, 1 family owner

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            • #7
              I second the bubble. I have a mild custom El Camino that has been in an outdoor capsule for years. Comes out out like it went in. The indoor version could only be better. There's a company that makes capsules that can be driven into...which eliminates my only complaint...unwrapping and re-wrapping the car when you want to take a quick ride. Unfortunately I don't remember the company's name.



              ErnieR




              On its way to a 15.097 Spring 2006.

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              • #8
                Ernie; does that thing actually have an air pump burning power 24X7?
                Looks like a good unit, other than it appears you have to keep it "pumped up" no? [:0]




                StudeRich at Studebakers Northwest -Ferndale,WA
                StudeRich
                Second Generation Stude Driver,
                Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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                • #9
                  I have a window fan and leave it on when the concrete and car sweat, run it for weeks when the temperature dances.

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                  • #10
                    Well, would it ruin the effect to have the car "rust-proofed"? There's a simple spray called "OIL-Tech" that I have used on 400,000 milers. It creeps into seams and is less oil than waxy. Leaves a dry wax-like coating. My '92 Legend Coupe gets a respray every year for about $100. My 55 K-code is in primer, but I intend to give it the same treatment, even if it doesn't see a winter. Would I lose points for being non-original?
                    Dave Warren (Perry Mason by day, Perry Como by night)

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                    • #11
                      truck is as rust proofed as I could get it. Still feel some areas I might not have reached. Today hit near a record high (hi 60's). Tonight will be in 30's. Moved truck to basement of home where temp stays about 55 degrees year round. Moved my 2001 Grand Cherokee outside for time being. (147,000 miles on it). feel this is best I can do for truck and jeep will have to be happy in polebarn when needed.

                      Randy Wilkin
                      1946 M5 Streetrod
                      Hillsboro,Ohio 45133
                      Randy Wilkin
                      1946 M5 Streetrod
                      Hillsboro,Ohio 45133

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                      • #12
                        I think the bubble may be your only really effective option. I encountered the same problem when I had my vehicles stored in an uninsulated steel building. Although it had a concrete floor, the temperature and humidity swings in the winter caused everything to sweat. Unfortunately, in the rust belt, warm weather in the winter is usually accompanied by high humidity. That means lots of sweating. Even though you can protect much of the car with rust-proofing, you can't do much for the engine, trans and rear axle, which stay cold for a long time. In one extreme case, my engines all sweated enough to create little puddles on the garage floor. I got rust on all kinds of weird places, like spark plugs, fuel lines, etc. And like you, I was sure water was collecting in places I couldn't see.

                        I finally bit the bullet and insulated the building. Problem solved (at considerable expense).

                        Skip Lackie
                        Washington DC
                        Skip Lackie

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                        • #13
                          I also have the same problem, as I'm sure many do.

                          Insulation and heat is one good cure.

                          Yet many good cars appear out of old barns - the difference, I am almost certain, is the presence of lots of wood to "buffer" the dampness. Wood seems to absorb excess humidity faster than car metal, and release it slowly. It also adds humidity in the summer when it could be drier. I have both metal and wood barns. The metal ones sweat profusely, and the ones with lots of wood do not.

                          It also appears that humidity can come up through poured concrete, however, that can controlled somewhat with better sealers, paints, and lots of old carpet. (Yes, recycle your neighbour's old carpet under your car. Remove if damp. It also keeps your feet warm.

                          I'm also thinking a dessicant in large quantities may work. Has anyone tried lots of kitty litter or baking soda or ???? Surely this stuff would trap excess mointure and release it slowly too. (or it can be removed). Mechanically, wind-powered air vents/turbines on the roof can vent out excess humidity as well.

                          Paul

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                          • #14
                            Kitty Litter, Oh Oh... My buddy did a re and re trans job on a Chrysler K-car in his drive way. Used Kitty litter to soak up the juices. He was under there one day and came up smelling like a port-o-potty. Every cat in the neighbourhood was making a contribution in his drive way. ????
                            Dave Warren (Perry Mason by day, Perry Como by night)

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                            • #15
                              I use a 92,000 BTU 93% efficient LP gas furnace in my garage.
                              It has a sealed combustion air system, IE draws air from outside and exhausts outside too, so it doesnt draw any gasoline fumes or other stuff into the combustion chamber(or light the garage on fire).
                              My garage is a Blitz built metal pole type building, with the aluminum insulation. One occasion when the igniter was out, we had the up and down weather and the ceiling did have condensation dripping from onto the cars and everything else. I keep a spare igniter on hand now just in case.
                              Havent needed it for seven years.


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