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Broken wheel bolt

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  • Rafe Hollister
    replied
    There is a chance that one broke because the rest are loose. And that would make a noise. Before I bought my 56, a previous owner switched all the left side to conventional threads, so that is an option. I've replaced lug bolts several times with just a hammer to get them out and nuts to get them in. My shop of choice is Armand Aleg's Auto Repair.
    Rafe Hollister
    Last edited by Rafe Hollister; 09-16-2021, 12:52 PM.

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  • strad von zarovich
    replied
    <Yes. They will press out without a lot of effort. Just be sure to support to backside when you press them out so nothing gets warped. I use big deep-well socket. >mbstude

    I was able to finally press the broken lug stud out using a 6 ton hydraulic press I purchased off of amazon for about $150 dollars. I used a deep 1-1/2" diameter socket that I kept in place with duct tape so that it wouldn't shift while lining the stud up on the press. I had previously tried to drill the stud out using a lenox 9/16" hole saw but honestly chickened out after cutting about 1/8" deep. Upon examining the drum after pressing the stud out it looks like drilling with the lenox hole saw probably would have worked if I would have stuck with it...thanks for everyone's help!
    Last edited by strad von zarovich; 09-15-2021, 04:04 PM.

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  • stradvonzarovich
    replied
    Can someone detail their setup for pushing the lug studs out? A vise or arbor press would need at least a 4" throat to reach the lug stud of a 1941 Champion...the largest arbor press I can find has a 3.84" throat & a vise with a 4" throat starts at $400+...I tried using an 8" clamp with 4" throat but it kept slipping off of the lug stud or the deep well socket on the other side used for support. This afternoon I also tried using a hydraulic press (440lb/2200kg pressure) I got off of amazon-it stopped dead when it hit that lug stud. I'm definitely open to sending my hub/drum out to a reputable Studebaker mechanic....

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  • Dan Timberlake
    replied
    Back in the late 1970s I drove out some rear axle stud(s ?) to replace them on a 1967 Barracuda 'on the car", using a big hammer lovingly applied.
    I pulled the new studs in with washers and a nut. As soon as everything was back together, the wheel bearing sang a song. I'm sure I dented/brinneled the bearing. Ever since I only press out studs.

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  • mbstude
    replied
    Originally posted by nvonada View Post

    That is really good news. Are you sure about that?
    Yes. They will press out without a lot of effort. Just be sure to support to backside when you press them out so nothing gets warped. I use big deep-well socket.

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  • Corbinstein0
    replied
    so it's worth asking the question...... Which wheel? Driver's side, Passenger, Front Or Rear?
    this will change the dynamic of the thread some.....

    ie, most Driver's side will be left hand thread and rears require removal of the drum with a special puller just to get at it.

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  • PackardV8
    replied
    A ‘41 model doesn’t have swedged lug studs. They’re a press fit.
    Originally posted by nvonada View Post
    That is really good news. Are you sure about that? I have a couple mildly boogered studs I would really like to replace and I have been dreading it. Nathan
    Take nothing for granted on an eighty-year-old Studebaker. Have someone who knows confirm yours are original. I can't count the "bitsa" cars and engines I've seen with the most unlikely amalgam of parts all flying in loose formation.

    jack vines

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  • JoeHall
    replied
    Originally posted by Greenstude View Post
    If there is one broken stud, check the rest for cracks, and replace any that have them.. When in doubt, replace. A hub or brake drum which is cracked must be replaced, preferably before the car is driven again.
    Agree, the shop idiot who ruined the one stud may well have damaged the others also.

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  • nvonada
    replied
    Originally posted by mbstude View Post
    A ‘41 model doesn’t have swedged lug studs. They’re a press fit.
    That is really good news. Are you sure about that? I have a couple mildly boogered studs I would really like to replace and I have been dreading it.

    Nathan

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  • Greenstude
    replied
    If there is one broken stud, check the rest for cracks, and replace any that have them.. When in doubt, replace. A hub or brake drum which is cracked must be replaced, preferably before the car is driven again.

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  • mbstude
    replied
    Originally posted by stradvonzarovich View Post
    Does anyone know of a mechanic that can repair a broken lug stud? This is for a 1941 Champion. I watched a video on youtube where this machinist drills out the swedging & then puts this custom jig under the hub & drum to prevent it from being crushed as he pushes the lug stud out with a press. Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated...
    A ‘41 model doesn’t have swedged lug studs. They’re a press fit.

    Just be sure to support the drum / hub in a way so that nothing gets distorted when the studs are pressed in and out.

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  • stradvonzarovich
    replied
    Does anyone know of a mechanic that can repair a broken lug stud? This is for a 1941 Champion. I watched a video on youtube where this machinist drills out the swedging & then puts this custom jig under the hub & drum to prevent it from being crushed as he pushes the lug stud out with a press. Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated...

    Leave a comment:


  • Jeffry Cassel
    replied
    Don't trust tire shops and mechanics! Years ago we went on a family vacation in our Ford CV wagon. Had local tire guy rotate and balance the wheels. It shook all the way to Alabama. My father in law knew a good guy out in the boonies. He found 2 or 3 broken bolts on every wheel and the remaining ones tightened to over 200 ft lbs! Used his entire supply of lug bolts to replace them all. The local guy could have killed us! (and the wheels weren't balanced correctly either.) Very common to have some born yesterday dropout doper try to remove left hand lug nuts by turning them ccw. That is why they are stamped 'L'

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  • Metman
    replied
    Makes one wonder, as 52-fan was asking... Did the broken stud occur at the shop, where they may have been blasting the left handed thread with an impact wrench trying to get it off (actually tightening) and sheared it?
    In any case, needs to be fixed.

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  • rockne10
    replied
    Originally posted by 52-fan View Post
    Is the broken stud on the left side and do they know those are left hand thread?
    Good point!
    As the old saying goes; on the left side, lefty tighty, righty loosey.

    Many right threaded studs are not stamped on the end; but I believe all left threaded studs are.
    Many people, even six or seven decades ago, were not aware of the right and left variation.
    Big trucks STILL use left threads on the left studs.

    Click image for larger version

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    Last edited by rockne10; 09-14-2020, 03:18 PM.

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