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Longer Lark Wheel Studs

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  • Wheels / Tires: Longer Lark Wheel Studs

    I have purchased a set of American Racing Torq Thrust wheels and now find that I can only get 6 turns on the wheel nuts when I tried to install them. This is not safe and I will need longer studs by at least a quarter of an inch to be safe. Has anyone else solved this problem and if so, what part number or what "modern " car has interchangeable studs with a 60 Lark, still running drum brakes if that matters? Thanks in advance.
    Bob
    Bob
    Welland Ontario
    60 Lark Convertible
    64 Daytona
    sigpic
    "They were meant to be driven ... so keep on cruizin"

  • #2
    www.dormanproducts.com
    1961 Hawk ...4-Speed;4bc;Twin Traction

    Ken Byrd
    Lewisville,NC

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    • #3
      Are you sure you have the right lug nuts for mags? Take your wheel to a speed shop and match them up. good luck

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      • #4
        It sounds to me like the wheels may not be seated all the way down on the brake drum. Is there something restricting the way, such as a different center hole size?
        Gary L.
        Wappinger, NY

        SDC member since 1968
        Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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        • #5
          Alloy wheels are can be a lot thicker than the steel ones depending on the design where the lug holes are/ I replaced a set of Magnum 500s with an alloy wheel that used a spoke design and had the same issue/ Replaced the original lugs with 3.00" ones from Speedway
          64 GT Hawk (K7)
          1970 Avanti (R3)

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          • #6
            Thanks to Blackhawk 61, I believe you have solved my problem.
            55Coupe, the lugsnuts I am trying to use were purchased at a local Speed Shop as Summitt shipped metric which I can't use. Anyone want a metric set cheap?
            Studegary +64VK7, The wheels are considerably thicker than the steel wheels that I now have on the car, although it is difficult to measure what the difference is. Have bought 2 sets of wheels from Summitt in past few years and find the quality is not what it once was. Cragers are now made offshore and my tire shop condemed 3 of the 4 before I put the car on the street. Summitt took them back no problem but the agravation and time to do it. So for the American Racing Torq Thrusts, I had them spun at the store and they went through 7 boxes before I was satisfied I had 4 reasonably straight wheels. Don't know where they are made, but when you are buying a new wheel, should it not be straight? They tell you to Hunter road force balance to make up for the lack of quality. Not for this guy.
            Again thanks for the responses, and keep on cruisin
            Bob
            Bob
            Welland Ontario
            60 Lark Convertible
            64 Daytona
            sigpic
            "They were meant to be driven ... so keep on cruizin"

            Comment


            • #7
              It is a bit exacting to change studs, pressing the old ones out have to be done carefully as not to distort the drum. Pressing in new studs should require a new interference fit. The new stud should be just a few thou larger than the hole and it should press in cutting a new spline, this will give you an assured tight fit. Currey also has studs. I did this procedure on a pair of wheels, I drilled out the old spline and cut in new ones with the new studs. I have a medium sized hydraulic press and the new studs pressed in relatively easy. They are a very tight fit. The only issue I had was the studs with the correct diameter were also extra long, my option was to cut off the excess or use longer deep chrome nuts, I used the longer nuts. Don't be in a hurry and do it right.

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              • #8
                When I first got Barney, he had Torq-Thrusts mounted. The secret lies in using the American Racing lug nuts specific to these wheels, which have a conical seat that centers the wheel mounting holes against the drum without letting the wheels actually touch the studs. Because of the design of the nuts, there are is about 0.125" more thread in contact with the studs than if you used standard flat nuts. The original drums and studs were still on the car and I ran it for quite a while like that.

                Hope you find this useful.

                Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

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                • #9
                  Seems like studebaker has shorter studs than most. I ran into this a ton. Closest fit I ever found was studs from an AMC my buddy at this hole-in-the-wall parts house only found those from flipping through the old parts books. Not on their computer program

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