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  • Exhaust: Busted Exhaust/Intake mount

    Hey everyone! Hope your driving is well and fun! Mine has come to a hault. I decided it was time to rebuild the Carb and repair the exhaust leak between the intake and exhaust. Well... The holes on the exhaust manifold have broken off, and all four bolts broke off in the intake. I can extract them, no problem... But how difficult, if even possible, will it be to braze weld new holes on the exhaust manifold? If that is not even possible... Does anyone know where I can find a replacement?

    1940 Studebaker President Inline 8

    Thank you for any help!

    -Joe
    Attached Files

    "Spilling a beer is the adult equivalent of a kid letting go of a Balloon."

  • #2
    Hi Joe -
    Similar mess on my Commander 6, but fortunately I found a good exhaust section. That’s definitely the best solution.

    For repair, I would consider making a thick rectangular steel piece with a large rectangular hole that can slip up from the bottom of the exhaust manifold and rest against the flange with the broken corners. This repair piece can have a hole in each corner for the bolts to attach the intake. That would be very strong and clamp the pieces tightly to prevent a leak.

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    • #3
      A good welder could grind down those ears. Then weld on new metal. Then drill new holes.

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      • #4
        GOOD welding shops can work miracles. Metal can be added and subtracted as needed. I hope that you can find a qualified shop to do the work. I've welded exhaust manifolds with good success, but mostly old trucks, or farm tractors, that didn't care how they looked after the repair.

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        • #5
          You might want to run a "want ad" on the AACA Studebaker forum and the Studebaker swap page.

          https://www.studebakerswap.com/swap/swap.php

          https://forums.aaca.org/forum/21-stu...rskine-rockne/


          Dan Peterson
          Montpelier, VT
          1960 Lark V-8 Convertible
          1960 Lark V-8 Convertible (parts car)

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by dpson View Post
            You might want to run a "want ad" on the AACA Studebaker forum and the Studebaker swap page.

            https://www.studebakerswap.com/swap/swap.php

            https://forums.aaca.org/forum/21-stu...rskine-rockne/

            Made a post. Thank you.

            "Spilling a beer is the adult equivalent of a kid letting go of a Balloon."

            Comment


            • #7
              I have a local welder in town who is going to weld some new bolt holes onto the exhaust manifold. The intake is pretty worn down, he is going to attempt to add some metal material aound the openings, but we are not to optimistic because the metal is soooo thin!
              Attached Files

              "Spilling a beer is the adult equivalent of a kid letting go of a Balloon."

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by tsenecal View Post
                GOOD welding shops can work miracles. Metal can be added and subtracted as needed. I hope that you can find a qualified shop to do the work. I've welded exhaust manifolds with good success, but mostly old trucks, or farm tractors, that didn't care how they looked after the repair.
                See if you can find a shop that builds ornamental fencing and other cast iron creations. I cracked an ear off a steering column clamp on my Willys and this welder had the right nickel-alloy stick and excellent technique, allowing me to install back to proper torque as well. No loss in physical strength.

                Cast alloys are a bear to work with. Hopefully your welder is up to the task.

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                • #9
                  Question.. Does anyone know what type of metal my exhaust manifold is made of? Cast Iron or Cast Steel?

                  My welder friend is very skilled and talented and knows what he is doing. He works in a Hot Rod shop and builds amazing stuff. But he is saying that the nickel he uses for welding cast iron is just falling off the metal without bonding. He is doing the proper technique of slowly raising the heat and slowly cooling it down. Any information on the material will be appreciated!

                  "Spilling a beer is the adult equivalent of a kid letting go of a Balloon."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    My exposure to them suggests they are cast iron. It's possible the iron is so contaminated that it just won't bond. If he hasn't already, he might try grinding through to a cleaner spot or letting it bake at high temperatures for a while if either is possible.

                    Back in another life my welder needed clean iron to weld and he used the same technique you mentioned. Hope someone else can give you better info.

                    Bob

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                    • #11
                      If I had that job in in my shop, I would grind the missing areas and maybe even sandblast the entire piece to inspect for more damage/cracks. Next, a sand box would be built to hold the manifold. Using a propane torch, gently heat the entire manifold. Then put it in the sand box and cover (leaving the area to be welded exposed). With a oxy/acetylene rose bud torch, heat the area to be welded to a good red color. Weld immediately! With stainless. It helps to have an assistant with a rose bud to keep the heat while you are welding. When you are done welding, bury the piece in sand immediately! Leave it alone for a day or two. Once it’s cooled to room temp, remove from the sand and set it up in the mill and machine the surface flat and drill the holes. One problem with using the stainless rod it the hardness so a carbide endmill would be used to drill the new holes. Neal

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Neal in NM View Post
                        If I had that job in in my shop, I would grind the missing areas and maybe even sandblast the entire piece to inspect for more damage/cracks. Next, a sand box would be built to hold the manifold. Using a propane torch, gently heat the entire manifold. Then put it in the sand box and cover (leaving the area to be welded exposed). With a oxy/acetylene rose bud torch, heat the area to be welded to a good red color. Weld immediately! With stainless. It helps to have an assistant with a rose bud to keep the heat while you are welding. When you are done welding, bury the piece in sand immediately! Leave it alone for a day or two. Once it’s cooled to room temp, remove from the sand and set it up in the mill and machine the surface flat and drill the holes. One problem with using the stainless rod it the hardness so a carbide endmill would be used to drill the new holes. Neal
                        I will pass this on to him. I know that he does heat it up alot and uses a sandbox as well. Thank you for the input!

                        "Spilling a beer is the adult equivalent of a kid letting go of a Balloon."

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