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Oil Filter Orifice

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  • Roger L.
    replied
    Got to wonder if they used different sizes in different applications.

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  • Mike Van Veghten
    replied
    The oil restrictor on my unmolested (99% stock-original), 1960, 259 powered Lark 2dr. wagon, measured .030".

    Mike

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  • Roger L.
    replied
    Hopefully problem solved! Went through all the Studebaker engines I have lying around and found a champion engine that may have had a factory installed oil filter. It had the orfice fitting in it that may be part no. 187802. When I measured the orfice it was a perfect fit for a #52 drill bit, that would be 0.0635". I also have another Commander truck engine that may have a fitting but it's lying on it's right side so I've got to move it to check.

    Roger List

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  • studegary
    replied
    Originally posted by Roger L. View Post
    Thanks Gary, that is quite an enlightening chart. Curious though why you seem to have two curves for a 0.060 orfice.

    On another note, anyone know what part no. 187802 is? The description of this in the M series parts book is: ELBOW, oil filter inlet pipe (cyl. end.) All the other fittings for connecting to the oil filter use part numbers from the standard parts section of the manual. This elbow is used on both the Champion and Commander engines. I'm assuming that since all the other fittings are from the standard parts listing that this particular elbow must contain the restrictor for the input to the filter. If someone would have one of these to verify that, it would lay to rest this issue once and for all.

    Roger List
    Not that Gary, but I think, from what I see on my small screen, that there are curves for 0.060 and 0.050, not two 0.060.

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    Originally posted by Roger L. View Post
    /Cut/On another note, anyone know what part no. 187802 is? The description of this in the M series parts book is: ELBOW, oil filter inlet pipe (Cyl. end.) All the other fittings for connecting to the oil filter use part numbers from the standard parts section of the manual.Roger List
    Quote: Dwain's Post #5:

    "The oil filter restrictor is .046", part #1549669. The .030" restrictor part # 530918 is for the fuel pump arm lubrication on the early style filler-mounted pump."

    This tells me that indeed the Engineered hardware had a drawing Number and that is why it has a Part Number, so you are right it likely was a restrictor Fitting, but earlier than the 1549669, and EVEN the 530918 and we don't know it's size YET.

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  • Roger L.
    replied
    Just checked the 2R parts manual. That part number is also used on 2R, 3R and E series trucks with the factory installed filter. On some it is prefixed with a G.

    Roger List

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  • Roger L.
    replied
    Thanks Gary, that is quite an enlightening chart. Curious though why you seem to have two curves for a 0.060 orfice.

    On another note, anyone know what part no. 187802 is? The description of this in the M series parts book is: ELBOW, oil filter inlet pipe (cyl. end.) All the other fittings for connecting to the oil filter use part numbers from the standard parts section of the manual. This elbow is used on both the Champion and Commander engines. I'm assuming that since all the other fittings are from the standard parts listing that this particular elbow must contain the restrictor for the input to the filter. If someone would have one of these to verify that, it would lay to rest this issue once and for all.

    Roger List

    Leave a comment:


  • Son O Lark
    replied
    Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
    Gary's Chart pretty much shuts up all those that say a Bi-Pass, partial flow Filter does NOTHING, and you would have to drive for Miles and Miles to Filter all the oil.
    Yep, and I would rather have a partial flow than no filter at all. Somewhere a long time ago I remember reading that a partial flow does better on smallest particles due to a slower flow through the filter medium.

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    Gary's Chart pretty much shuts up all those that say a Bi-Pass, partial flow Filter does NOTHING, and you would have to drive for Miles and Miles to Filter all the oil.

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  • garyash
    replied
    Since hot oil has a viscosity nearly like water at room temperature, I hooked the garden hose and a pressure gauge to an orifice and measured how much water came out. At 40 psi through an 0.045" orifice, there is about 1 quart a minute flow. The flow will vary with the square of the diameter, so an 0.060" orifice will have 75-80% more flow, an 0.030" orifice will have about 45% of the 0.045" one.
    Click image for larger version

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    Attached Files

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  • 345 DeSoto
    replied
    When I installed a remote oil filter system on my Sky Hawk, I used a .045 carburetor jet drill bit. Seems to work just fine...

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  • Dwain G.
    replied
    The oil filter restrictor is .046", part #1549669. The .030" restrictor part # 530918 is for the fuel pump arm lubrication on the early style filler-mounted pump.

    Click image for larger version

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  • Roger L.
    replied
    The fitting that measured 0.030 " is a straight fitting.

    Roger List

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  • Skip Lackie
    replied
    A number 56 (.0465") drill bit is the biggest one that will fit in the one I have. However, Fram used both straight and L-shaped fittings in different filter kits, and they may not have all had the same orifice.

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  • jclary
    replied
    I'm probably the last person you should trust about this (so wait for more answers), but the .030 measurement was the first thing that popped into my mind as familiar.

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