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Weight of 170ci long block

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  • #16
    I was shocked by mine too. Decades of oil and heat does nothing good to rubber. When you get it all back together you will probably need to adjust your shift linkage and maybe even your gas pedal linkage since the engine will have moved significantly. I am glad that worked!
    _______________
    http://stude.vonadatech.com
    https://jeepster.vonadatech.com

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    • #17
      Will do that for sure - thanks.

      After not too much wrangling, the engine was freed this morning. Once clutch and rear plate are removed, I’ll bring it onto the stand in the background

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      • #18
        Continuing the refreshening of the engine bay led me this weekend to remove the transmission and the bellhousing.

        Honestly, after 60+ years, the amount of hardened grime and dirt that had to be removed just to access the four trans-to-bellhousing screws weighed perhaps 3 pounds and took the longest part of the time-on-job.

        A similar Borg-Warner T-9x transmission was in my '50 Willys Jeepster, but they made the design simpler to remove by dropping the crossmember and bringing the bellhousing-trans down as a unit, but likely far less rigid as frame structure. Looking at how the crossmember in the Lark is attached (inboard and outboard fitments), I was content to contort my arms and hands to fish out the four large screws. And the rubber mounts were so soft that the entire unit rocked as if it were on springs. Both being replaced with the parts coming from S-I.

        Question: with a nearly-identical Detroit Gear (Spicer?) design on the prop shaft u-joints, why did Studebaker not give us zerk fittings to lube the joints? The manual instructs us to press the bearings/yoke out with an arbor press....hardly a convenient job for the lube rack back in the day.

        Any reason why?
        Attached Files
        Last edited by NCDave51; 08-31-2020, 02:53 PM.

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        • #19
          Seems unlikely that clutch shaft was lubed recently! Your bell housing alignment should be OK but it is still worth checking when you put it back together. I have never seen a U-joint without a zerk but there are lots of things I have never seen. The lubrication diagram has lines going right to where the zerk should be.
          _______________
          http://stude.vonadatech.com
          https://jeepster.vonadatech.com

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          • #20
            I picked up two new u-joints from my local NAPA, and they had both non-lube and lube-enabled options, so I chose the latter. They cross-referenced to the OEM part and was thankful that Spicer (Dana) made this a common design across plenty of car makes.

            Using a suitable 3/8”-drive socket, I drifted the bearings in with little issue. The only challenge is with the circlips and the Service manual did make mention of this for the 59 and 60 6-cyl models, excluding the Y-chassis: there was slight design change that made it necessary to use thinner spring clips if the fit was too tight. I’ve ground down one as a test to make it thinner, but realized I might be removing the strength of the clip if I go too far.
            Anyone else had this issue? Are there thinner clips of a similar design available?

            The stock/NAPA replacement clips are ~0.059”.

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            • #21
              Did you clean out the grooves? If you have to sand them down a little that should not matter. They don't get a lot of force on them.
              _______________
              http://stude.vonadatech.com
              https://jeepster.vonadatech.com

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              • #22
                Originally posted by nvonada View Post
                Did you clean out the grooves? If you have to sand them down a little that should not matter. They don't get a lot of force on them.
                I did indeed. Thx for checking.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by NCDave51 View Post
                  Will do that for sure - thanks.

                  After not too much wrangling, the engine was freed this morning. Once clutch and rear plate are removed, I’ll bring it onto the stand in the background
                  Be extra careful with that tricycle engine stand. They can be questionable with a 4 or V8, but the straight six will place lots more load on that one wheel, making it even more prone to tipping over. Ask me how I know!
                  Ron Dame
                  '63 Champ

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                  • #24
                    From time to time, I have had to slightly grind /home down the circlips to allow them to fully insert into the groove, but never so much that I thought the strength of the circlips would be compromised.
                    Paul
                    Winston-Salem, NC
                    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Ron Dame View Post

                      Be extra careful with that tricycle engine stand. They can be questionable with a 4 or V8, but the straight six will place lots more load on that one wheel, making it even more prone to tipping over. Ask me how I know!
                      Thanks for circling back - it’s been absolutely great. This is a 750# stand that angles the block upward, bringing the center of gravity slightly back towards the main stand. Wheeled in and out of the garage - no issues.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by r1lark View Post
                        From time to time, I have had to slightly grind /home down the circlips to allow them to fully insert into the groove, but never so much that I thought the strength of the circlips would be compromised.
                        I’ve ordered some 15-4PH stainless rotor clips that are 0.042” thick versus the 0.060” these joints came with, just to be sure. It’s that close of a difference. Side load rating is >3,500 lbs.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by NCDave51 View Post

                          Thanks for circling back - it’s been absolutely great. This is a 750# stand that angles the block upward, bringing the center of gravity slightly back towards the main stand. Wheeled in and out of the garage - no issues.
                          Like Ron, it's 'been there done that' for me too! A Ford FE engine (428 Police Interceptor, with non-stock 2x4 intake/carbs)...........all it took was a 3/8" nut on the floor, and pushing at just the right angle. Luckily it was at the edge of the concrete and actually fell out the garage door onto the ground. Thank goodness the only damage was to the wrinkle paint on the end of one valve cover - the dirt cushioned it. But getting it back up was a chore, since at the time I only had a chain hoist that was in just one location inside.

                          That stand got a piece of rectangular tubing and two casters welded to the front pretty quick!
                          Paul
                          Winston-Salem, NC
                          Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

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                          • #28
                            I sold my late father's flathead Merc V8 yesterday. I was rolling it out on a homemade wheeled platform and it tried to go over. I caught it but it was close. That gravity is on all the time...
                            _______________
                            http://stude.vonadatech.com
                            https://jeepster.vonadatech.com

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                            • #29
                              Funny, how this discussion has illuminated some of the issues common to all of us who enjoy our backyard restoration projects. Safety is always an issue and it doesn't take much of a brief risky move, or oversight, to endanger not only yourself but the impact it could have on your loved ones. Even if not a serious accident, if you become incapacitated for just a short period, you could suffer financially, affect your job stability, and turn your loved one into a caregiver while you recover.

                              Decades ago, I bought one of those three-legged engine stands (new in the box) at a flea market for less than $30. I have hung 6 and 8 cylinder engines on it and it never seemed stable with either one. Thank goodness for craigslist and a little patience. Through the years, I have picked up an engine hoist and a Jeg's four-legged engine hoist for pennies on the dollar compared to buying from a retailer.

                              As to the fate of that old three-legged engine hoist...Jerry Forrester might call it "Fabricobbling," and I call it "Hillbilly Engineering," but I converted it into a chrome buffing machine. Even then, it sits mostly unused, taking up space.

                              The engine hoist was only used once by a young engineer living in a housing development where he only used it for a small Mazda engine and needed the hoist out of his small garage. Due to HOA regulations and his small space, selling the hoist was more important than the trouble it would cause by keeping it. He told me that it was not all that good and didn't perform to his expectations. After getting it home, I bled the air out, and (as with our hydraulic brakes) it works terrific!
                              John Clary
                              Greer, SC

                              SDC member since 1975

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by jclary View Post
                                Funny, how this discussion has illuminated some of the issues common to all of us who enjoy our backyard restoration projects. Safety is always an issue and it doesn't take much of a brief risky move, or oversight, to endanger not only yourself but the impact it could have on your loved ones. Even if not a serious accident, if you become incapacitated for just a short period, you could suffer financially, affect your job stability, and turn your loved one into a caregiver while you recover.

                                Decades ago, I bought one of those three-legged engine stands (new in the box) at a flea market for less than $30. I have hung 6 and 8 cylinder engines on it and it never seemed stable with either one. Thank goodness for craigslist and a little patience. Through the years, I have picked up an engine hoist and a Jeg's four-legged engine hoist for pennies on the dollar compared to buying from a retailer.

                                As to the fate of that old three-legged engine hoist...Jerry Forrester might call it "Fabricobbling," and I call it "Hillbilly Engineering," but I converted it into a chrome buffing machine. Even then, it sits mostly unused, taking up space.

                                The engine hoist was only used once by a young engineer living in a housing development where he only used it for a small Mazda engine and needed the hoist out of his small garage. Due to HOA regulations and his small space, selling the hoist was more important than the trouble it would cause by keeping it. He told me that it was not all that good and didn't perform to his expectations. After getting it home, I bled the air out, and (as with our hydraulic brakes) it works terrific!
                                Lots of good feedback, everyone. Thanks.

                                Safety is always first with me - I’ve been an industrial chemist for the paper industry for the past 31 years. Completely agree that nothing worth doing is a reason to shortcut safety.

                                Wanted to contrast the “hoist” from the “stand”.

                                I engineered and built a 2,000# static lift trestle (duplex 2x4) that has a 1 ton chain hoist to only lift vertically. No side loads per se. Engine lifted and vehicle rolled back and forth as needed. Perfect for my needs and this my third vehicle thus far.

                                Keeping a well-swept shop floor is also paramount - speaking to the comment above where a single fastener caused a tip-over.

                                Safety was also front-of-mind when I said goodbye to always working under jack stands and instead invested in a MaxJax. It’s not with concerns over static load ratings or the recent weld flaw discussion on HBT stands, it was the head contusions and poor body positions and limited arm/leg freedom that these inexpensive floor hoists help eliminate.

                                Yes, I still use a floor jack and jack stands for tire changes, etc., but anything higher or more in-depth will see me use the MaxJax.

                                That all said, I’ll make sure to be careful with the three-wheel engine stand. Engine should be going back in for good next week.

                                Great community here.

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