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Engine specs

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  • Engine: Engine specs

    I am trying to get the engine in my 1962 Lark rebuilt. It is a 6 cylinder The machine shop needs to know the cylinder bore and the standard crank measurements. Does anyone know these? Thanks.
    Randy Jetton

  • #2
    If the machine shop doesn't know the bore and crank size for your OHV 170, they should not be rebuilding vintage engines.

    Comment


    • #3
      Bore 3". Con. rod journal diameter 1.81175"-1.81275". Main bearing journal diameter 3.0623"-3.0628".

      Comment


      • #4
        Every spec and procedure you need is in the factory manuals that are available from several of our Vendors. Any serious owner of a vintage car, (not only Studebaker), should obtain the specifications and get familiar with them so that they will have enough knowledge to keep some hack mechanic from taking advantage of them.

        Not trying to be harsh with my comments, but it is a reality of our hobby that the better informed you are, the less likely you will be to get burned, become discouraged and leave the hobby. Joining the SDC and discovering all the resources available is one of the best things I ever did. In the 46 years since I joined...I have attended many funerals of friends and family who teased me about my Studebaker claiming "You will not be able to get parts!"...Many of those services, I attended their last rites...driving a Studebaker.
        John Clary
        Greer, SC

        SDC member since 1975

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by ChampionRuss View Post
          If the machine shop doesn't know the bore and crank size for your OHV 170, they should not be rebuilding vintage engines.
          Fully agree!
          Paul
          Winston-Salem, NC
          Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by r1lark View Post

            Fully agree!
            UNFAIR...comments..!
            Very few people or shops, will have the interior specifications for EVERY pre-1975 (or so) engine ever manufactured memorized.
            That's just a silly, unfair and foolish comment. It's also probably impossible..!

            What those comments SHOULD have said -

            If the shop that you are using does not have a library (books/manuals) handy to find the required specs., or the internet connection to find the required specifications, THEN you should find another shop.

            And yes, that is a fair statement.

            Mike

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Mike Van Veghten View Post

              UNFAIR...comments..!
              Very few people or shops, will have the interior specifications for EVERY pre-1975 (or so) engine ever manufactured memorized.
              That's just a silly, unfair and foolish comment. It's also probably impossible..!

              What those comments SHOULD have said -

              If the shop that you are using does not have a library (books/manuals) handy to find the required specs., or the internet connection to find the required specifications, THEN you should find another shop.

              And yes, that is a fair statement.

              Mike
              I agree totally with you Mike. Every machine shop I ever dealt with has reams of technical info on engines going back at least to the '40s (of last century). If they don't have this info, and are not willing to do a little looking to find it, run the other way quickly.
              This is exactly what I based my comment on. Surely you don't think that I think a machinist should have every measurement on every engine ever made memorized?!? LOL
              Paul
              Winston-Salem, NC
              Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Randy,
                I have a coupe of questions:
                1. Has this car been in the family since new or fairly new? Did you learn to drive in this car?
                2. Considering the cost to rebuild the six, (3,000 to 4,500) would it be more cost effective to secure a Studebaker V8 that is in good shape? That would require upgrading the brakes and springs.
                3. Is this going to be your daily driver or the less than 1,000 miles per year?

                Just bringing a few questions to mind as you start down a sometimes long road to rebuilding. I have currently a 1962 Lark V8 with standard/overdrive and I have owned a 1962 Lark 6 with overdrive. I have enjoyed both cars. I can understand the sentimental attachment to owning a car for a long time, but I also see what benefit there is in upgrading.

                Bob Miles

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by r1lark View Post

                  I agree totally with you Mike. Every machine shop I ever dealt with has reams of technical info on engines going back at least to the '40s (of last century). If they don't have this info, and are not willing to do a little looking to find it, run the other way quickly.
                  This is exactly what I based my comment on. Surely you don't think that I think a machinist should have every measurement on every engine ever made memorized?!? LOL
                  I was commenting on the original comment "mostly"... But...your comment was in "agreement" with the first comment...soooo....
                  No hard time intended, just like I said, just a comment on that original comment about..."they shouldn't be rebuilding vintage engines".

                  Mike

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