Announcement

Collapse

Get more Tips, Specs and Technical Data!

Did you know... this Forum is a service of the Studebaker Drivers Club? For more technical tips, specifications, history and tech data, visit the Tech Tips page at the SDC Homepage: www.studebakerdriversclub.com/tips.asp
See more
See less

Spindles numbers and years?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by Swede. View Post
    /Cut/Steering arm # A 756.
    Can someone confirm if that's correct please?
    The Steering Arm is connected to the Spindle but has it's own Picture Number 1204-34 and Part Number 529050 same both sides and all '53 to '58 and probably way beyond.

    You would need a Studebaker Part Number to identify that, A 756 is not.
    I think there is very little chance they could be wrong, but that Hunk of Iron Disc. Brake Bracket probably is not for a Studebaker.
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
      but that Hunk of Iron Disc. Brake Bracket probably is not for a Studebaker.
      According to Bill @ 'Hot Rods and Brakes', where I bought his SB-1 kit (small 10.25" rotor to clear 14" rims) it is...
      However it had to be modified A LOT to fit!
      And like I said before, won't actually allow the caliper to slide since the banjo bolt jams on the steering arm...
      How others managed to buy this, bolt it on straight out of the box and drive is a mystery to me!
      Hence why I'm checking all parts here to make sure I don't have some weird mix of parts that would make for this debacle before I do a full write up/review. But it sure looks like it's all the correct pieces, at least within the year ranges it should fit from the information you guys been giving. Which I'm really thankful for!

      Comment


      • #18
        The first 4 pics. look like someone used a oxy-acetylene torch and cut them out by hand. I was going to say with a hatchet, but. The second 4 is what most outfits make for them now with Chev. brake parts. I would like a pic. of the interference with the banjo.

        Comment


        • #19
          Is there a left and right to the calipers? What happens if you swap them? If the banjo is at the bottom against the steering arm on the left, it should be at the top if used on the right.
          sigpic

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by bensherb View Post
            Is there a left and right to the calipers? What happens if you swap them? If the banjo is at the bottom against the steering arm on the left, it should be at the top if used on the right.
            Tried that (yes, they are side specific) and that won't work at all since there is no clearance at all against the king-pin. Which btw. would also make for a very hard way to bleed the brakes since there is only about 1/8" for the bleeder...

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Alan View Post
              I would like a pic. of the interference with the banjo.
              It's not fully tightened due to having to have it slightly loose or it would be impossible to get one of the caliper mounting bolts in since the hose is in the way for it (and I didn't wanted to use the copper washers just to test fit it). But as you can see it literally would be impossible to tighten in place but more critical the caliper would not be able to move! And I will obviously not cut clearance on the steering arm..! Contemplated a low profile banjo bolt but those are not that low to start with but the heads are usually larger diameter which wouldn't help at all. Thought maybe an AN/NPT typ fitting and a hose straight down would work but same thing, they aren't much smaller.

              Comment


              • #22
                I know you must have gotten those calipers with the kit but I would go with Willwood calipers. Those big, heavy, clunky iron calipers are not my idea of performance and the banjo fitting are large too.

                Comment


                • #23
                  A couple of things to check out. Those should be 69-77 GM mid size calipers with a 7 1/16" centre to centre bolt holes. Speedway has a few things you can try. They have brake lines with fittings that are smaller and lower with stainless steel braid hose. Or like I said in an earlier post you could go with Willwood which uses 1/8" pipe fitting on the back side of the caliper in the middle. They are lighter, have 4 pistons, longer shoes. Only drawback is they are not for CASO's.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Alan View Post
                    Only drawback is they are not for CASO's.
                    What's 'CASO's'?
                    And at this point I'm not gonna spend 3-400 bucks to fix a brake kit that's sold as *'CAD designed and parts are CNC machined.' (and still nothing fits and also says in the instructions that the holes in the spindle had to be drilled out bigger... Would think if you CNC'd the parts there should be good enough precision to fit, especially since the 3/8" bolts easily fit the stock spindle holes!) and
                    *'All kits are bolt-on, no welding required.' (Well, I didn't have to weld anything, so that's only 50% a lie!)

                    The whole reason I decided to buy a $585 kit was to save some time from having to locate the unidentified parts from the disk brakes that was on the car or design/fabricate/machine my own from scratch (which I've could done since I got decades of experience as a professional racecar mechanic, custom fabricator and done quite a bit of machine shop work too, just to clear up that it's not exactly my first time slinging wrenches and working on a vintage car.)
                    So now I'm having to try to get Bill to act as a serious business and take back the useless parts,, and I have to start back from zero, with now spindles that have three holes that are 'to big'...

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      OK Swede, We have a number of questions here. A caso is a cheap a$$ Stude owner. Don't give up on the brackets, if you have been wrenching on cars for any length of time you will know that you can fix about anything made of metal. Which holes are you talking about, the 4 holding the bracket to the spindle or the 2 holding the caliper. Although it sounds like you took a drill to the spindle. It is easy to make spacers that will fix the holes. But you should have modified the bracket.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        I had to modify all the holes, the three bolting it to the spindle since they didn't line up and the spindle holes as said in the instructions. The caliper holes was spaced ok but poorly threaded however the opening that the caliper was 'sitting' in didn't have enough clearance for it to sit square for the bolts to go in.
                        It's all going back, since the steering arm/hose/banjo bolt interference make it useless. I have identified what the old parts was and will rebuild those instead. They after all worked for the previous owner for decades! Definitely not a pretty bracket (but fits!) but it have six holes (that line up!) so with all filled with fine thread grade eight bolts (or possibly aircraft grade bolts since then they will have a shoulder thru instead of threads) it will be ok even with the three slightly oversized holes I'm sure.

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X