Announcement

Collapse

Get more Tips, Specs and Technical Data!

Did you know... this Forum is a service of the Studebaker Drivers Club? For more technical tips, specifications, history and tech data, visit the Tech Tips page at the SDC Homepage: www.studebakerdriversclub.com/tips.asp
See more
See less

Getting long-dormant V8 running

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Engine: Getting long-dormant V8 running

    CAR: 1964 GT Hawk R1, 4-spd, 72k miles, SN: 64V-2352.

    OBJECTIVE: Get the engine running. The car has been stored (never started) in a dry gagage since the early 1970s. This was a good running engine when stored.
    I assume that, after all this time, all the bearings and the cam lobes are likely bone dry. So, my plan (so far, anyway) is:

    PLAN:
    (1) Pull engine, remove heads, get a valve job done & clean out rocker shaft.
    (2) Rebuild carb (original AFB) & fuel pump. Check out ignition system.
    (3) Remove oil pan & clean.
    (4) Remove main & rod bearing caps & apply assembly lube. Remove cam and lube.
    (5) Remove freeze plugs, clean out block.
    (6) Assemble everything.
    (7) Re-install engine in car, install break-in oil.
    (8) Spin oil pump CCW with a cordless drill & slotted rod to bring up oil pressure for a sufficient period of time. Rotate crank 90 deg. & repeat three more times.
    (9) Install dist., remove coil wire, crank engine for a period of time using starter.
    (10) Install coil wire and start engine.

    What do y'all think?
    -Dwight

  • #2
    IMHO, I would pull the plugs, use a wrench to see if the engine will rotate. If you have to, use an ATF/Acetone mix and squirt in each cylinder. Change oil and filter, fill filter with oil if possible. Try rotating engine, if it does, try hooking a battery to it and try cranking it. I would remove the fuel line to the pump to keep from picking garbage up. I like using a remote starter to keep an eye on things. If it cranks, check for oil pressure. Once it's up, check for spark. All good, add some fuel. It's how I woke up both my Willys Pickup, sitting for 12 years and my Hawk, sitting since 96'. No sense in rebuilding it if it runs. Check out Jonathan W. Youtube videos. Out of all the videos of "First Starts", he's only had to take down one or two engines. One a 56 Hawk and the other an Elcar. He's recently started a Buick Straight 8, Cadillac flathead, GMC 305 V6, none of which he's taken apart and pretty certain, sitting longer than your engine. Good luck.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Dwight FitzSimons View Post
      CAR: 1964 GT Hawk R1, 4-spd, 72k miles, SN: 64V-2352.

      OBJECTIVE: Get the engine running. The car has been stored (never started) in a dry gagage since the early 1970s. This was a good running engine when stored.
      I assume that, after all this time, all the bearings and the cam lobes are likely bone dry. So, my plan (so far, anyway) is:

      PLAN:
      (1) Pull engine, remove heads, get a valve job done & clean out rocker shaft.
      (2) Rebuild carb (original AFB) & fuel pump. Check out ignition system.
      (3) Remove oil pan & clean.
      (4) Remove main & rod bearing caps & apply assembly lube. Remove cam and lube.
      (5) Remove freeze plugs, clean out block.
      (6) Assemble everything.
      (7) Re-install engine in car, install break-in oil.
      (8) Spin oil pump CCW with a cordless drill & slotted rod to bring up oil pressure for a sufficient period of time. Rotate crank 90 deg. & repeat three more times.
      (9) Install dist., remove coil wire, crank engine for a period of time using starter.
      (10) Install coil wire and start engine.

      What do y'all think?
      -Dwight
      Agree with your plan, except I'd first spin the oil pump; remove the plugs and squirt an ounce or two of your favorite break-free concoction into the cylinders, then (and only then) manually try to get it to turn over. After that, I'd follow your plan to the letter.

      Comment


      • #4
        There is definitely some merit to Topper's plan though.
        After soaking cylinders, changing Oil & Filter, checking for stuck valves before turning it, and lastly Spinning the Oil pump, you should be safe to get it running and THEN decide everything it needs after a compression test.

        If you do pull the Engine that will allow you to Re-seal & Gasket it. Don't forget to flush it out after removing the Core Plugs.
        StudeRich
        Second Generation Stude Driver,
        Proud '54 Starliner Owner

        Comment


        • #5
          The engine does turn over. I forgot one thing in my first post. This engine had a problem with sticking valves when it was last run, in the early 1970s. So, I think I'll have to pull the heads to fix that. The reason I'm antsy about dry bearings is the '64 Avanti (R1) I bought around 1990 (had sat for 20 years). On that engine I pulled the valve covers and it was bone dry. Next I pulled the intake and valley cover. The valley area was bone dry, except for gray sludge (lead) in the small valleys. It was as if the oil had simply evaporated over a long period of time.

          I then pulled the heads and #4 cylinder was full of corrosion, both iron oxide and aluminum oxide. That cylinder wall was corroded such that it would require a sleeve. I appreciate the above comments--I have learned some things already. I am looking forward to working on the engine and will start Wednesday.
          -Dwight

          Comment


          • #6
            Your list is the safest way, for sure. You won't have a chance of wiping out a cam lobe, everything will be clean, and it will have new seals which are likely bad after sitting that long. Congrats on finding a very nice car, and Good Luck with your plan!

            Comment


            • #7
              But get it capable of stopping before you get it capable of running. Or, at the very least, don't let it move far under its own power.
              "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

              Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
              Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
              sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

              Comment


              • #8
                Over the years I have been successful (lucky) with every dormant restart. I agree with your list but in most of my cases that wasn't possible(car location etc) so I'd pull the plugs and healthily spray the cylinders (depending on how long it was dormant) with WD40 or the likes, pour at least one quart or more ATF down the carburetor, turn over by hand if possible, fresh fuel supply and voila. A ton of smoke for sure but it has always worked. One early 50's Ex military Dodge flat head had been sitting for over 40 years and after it settled down to idle, you could place a cup of water on the cylinder head and there were no ripples.
                Good Luck,
                Bill

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm guessing you will attack the same level of intensity with the brakes, suspension, body etc....? What's the expected service out of this car ? Looks ? Parades ? Car shows ? If so, you might be misdirected and a bit over cautious on your engine (resto) process.....JMHO...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'm undecided as of now what my long-term plans are for the car. But, it's such a good opportunity to get grease under my fingernails again, and see the engine run again. Part of the reason for doing such a detailed job on the engine is just for the fun (and learning) of it. Nice large garage, concrete floor, all the equipment needed, good weather this time of the year, and I have help. The front clip is off, so access will be easy. What more could one ask?

                    As an aside, no one ever siphoned out the gas tank. We removed that last week and poured about a gallon of black gas out of it. In the bottom of the tank was about an inch of black, hardened, crusty stuff. Dropping the tank on the ground repeatedly dislodged some of it and we dumped that out. There is a trusted radiator shop near here, so it will go to them.
                    -Dwight

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Dwight FitzSimons View Post
                      I'm undecided as of now what my long-term plans are for the car. But, it's such a good opportunity to get grease under my fingernails again, and see the engine run again. Part of the reason for doing such a detailed job on the engine is just for the fun (and learning) of it. Nice large garage, concrete floor, all the equipment needed, good weather this time of the year, and I have help. The front clip is off, so access will be easy. What more could one ask?

                      As an aside, no one ever siphoned out the gas tank. We removed that last week and poured about a gallon of black gas out of it. In the bottom of the tank was about an inch of black, hardened, crusty stuff. Dropping the tank on the ground repeatedly dislodged some of it and we dumped that out. There is a trusted radiator shop near here, so it will go to them.
                      -Dwight
                      Dwight, I like what you proposed in starting the engine and adding Joe's suggestion to the list. Before I'd spend another cent on the car, I'd be sure of the engine condition and at least get it turned over before you do anything else major to the car. Everything else can add up but the engine condition will let you know how expensive the build will be to get it on the road as it is potentially the major cost determining factor.

                      Bob

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If you tear down the engine you should auger out the oil galleys in the crank shaft, I didn't and after 12 hours of running I had to tear it down a second time.

                        Comment


                        • #13

                          I would say removing cyl heads, bearing caps and freeze plugs is likely unnecessary.

                          Wait to rebuild the carb until it is running and shows signs that it needs rebuilding.

                          Spinning the oil pump is a very good idea. Put in some oil that has zinc in it or an extra zinc additive.

                          Remove the spark plugs and squirt some oil in the cylinders and turn the engine over w/o plugs.


                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X