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  • PackardV8
    replied
    Originally posted by Son O Lark View Post

    Curious on why EPAS would ruin the steering unit. Did it happen to you?
    Sad to say, the steering gearboxes Studebaker used (Saginaw excepted) were the lightest duty, cheapest units they could buy. In a Champion with narrow wheels and bias ply tires, they'd last as long as the rest of the car. Drive the car past its normal life span, then, at the end, fit wider wheels, radial tires and an EPAS unit. The wider radials are grabbing the pavement and the EPAS is twisting the shaft, insisting the tires move. Think of the Polish cavalry between Russian and German panzer tanks; the already worn-out little steering box was never designed to be in the middle of so many vastly stronger opposing forces.

    jack vines
    Last edited by PackardV8; 05-26-2020, 08:23 AM.

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  • Son O Lark
    replied
    Originally posted by Ross View Post
    Please don't overlook that Champions came with lighter duty steering gears than the V-8s did, in line with the ever so much lighter front end weight. The friction in them when confronted with wide tires and a heavy V8 would give Arnold Scharzneger pause. Am not remotely a fan of Ross steering gears especially the Champion ones. If your car is a sedan you can find and fit a vastly superior Saginaw unit--you can in fact take the whole shebang and column from a Lark though the wheel will a bit further away. I have that in my 56 Pres and like it quite well unassisted.

    Yes, you can fit an EPAS to your existing box but it will only hasten turning it into a small casting full of metal shavings. Have found, by the way, that Hankook Optimo tires steer with astonishing ease and grip well.
    Curious on why EPAS would ruin the steering unit. Did it happen to you?

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  • JoeHall
    replied
    I have had the same problem with every 56J that came without PS, and have converted several to PS, for myself and others. I would not own any 1950s-early 60s V8 Studebaker without PS. Power steering is a game changer, whether it be factory OEM or electric. Skinny poly tires will help, but will bring new problems. Greasing the steering & suspension will help, but only about 5 percent as much as PS will help.

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  • JoeK
    replied
    Thanks guys I learned a lot. Mine is a two door sedan BO

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  • Bo Markham
    replied
    Originally posted by JoeK View Post
    Hi Guys I got a 55 Studebaker Champion. Previous owner installed a Studebaker 289 V8. Car runs fine only problem is it's hard steering. I checked all the steering components everything seems fine. I don't have room for power steering and as far as I can see, I don't think the block is drilled for brackets. I'm wondering if skinner tire on the front would help. I have 215/70R15s on it now. Before I spend the money on tires and possibly new wheels I need to know if this would help the hard steering problem....thanks Joe
    Is your Champion a Sedan/Wagon, or CK car

    Bo

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  • Ross
    replied
    Please don't overlook that Champions came with lighter duty steering gears than the V-8s did, in line with the ever so much lighter front end weight. The friction in them when confronted with wide tires and a heavy V8 would give Arnold Scharzneger pause. Am not remotely a fan of Ross steering gears especially the Champion ones. If your car is a sedan you can find and fit a vastly superior Saginaw unit--you can in fact take the whole shebang and column from a Lark though the wheel will a bit further away. I have that in my 56 Pres and like it quite well unassisted.

    Yes, you can fit an EPAS to your existing box but it will only hasten turning it into a small casting full of metal shavings. Have found, by the way, that Hankook Optimo tires steer with astonishing ease and grip well.

    Leave a comment:


  • 62champ
    replied
    Originally posted by studegary View Post
    The first thing to do is to make sure everything in the front end is properly lubricated. Some just hit a fitting with a couple of shots of grease. The most important area is the king pins. You need to see fresh grease come out of the upper end in order to get the thrust washer greased.
    One thing I have done to make sure the grease is well spread out is to get the front wheels up off the ground - tires off and blocks under the A-arms works well. While you (or someone who lost the bet) slowly pumps grease into those moving steering parts, have someone else slowly turning the steering wheel from lock to lock - with gentle pressure and those items moving, grease will get squished around where it needs to go. Good luck

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    If you have a Studebaker V8 Engine in your Champion, their is NO reason you cannot install the Bendix Control Valve, Ram and P/S Pump just the same as a similar Commander V8, but using '59 to '64 Bendix/Eaton Lark Parts if it is a Sedan, or Hawk Parts if a C or K, instead of '55 Saginaw Parts.

    The Pump Mounts on the drivers side of Water Manifold with existing Bolt holes in the Block and Head.

    But really GOOD greasing al all 15 Zerks on all Steering components, checking for binds and the correct P205X75R15 Tires will REALLY help!

    These are good looking Narrow White Walls in your Size:
    http://us.coopertire.com/tires/trendsetter-se
    Last edited by StudeRich; 05-11-2020, 12:53 PM.

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  • 64V-K7
    replied
    Don't forget the grease fitting at the rear of the main crossmember .....

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  • JoeK
    replied
    Thanks Guys for the reply's

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  • studegary
    replied
    The first thing to do is to make sure everything in the front end is properly lubricated. Some just hit a fitting with a couple of shots of grease. The most important area is the king pins. You need to see fresh grease come out of the upper end in order to get the thrust washer greased.

    EDIT: Those tires have an awfully large patch of rubber on the road for non-ps car.

    Leave a comment:


  • Commander Eddie
    replied
    I have a '55 President with power steering. I replaced the tires about a year ago with closer to original 195/65R15s. I wanted to stay with radials because I drive the car often. As soon as I drove away from the tire shop I noticed the difference. Even with power steering it felt easier to steer. It had a lighter touch. I suspect the difference would be felt even more so without power steering. So, try the narrow tires.
    Last edited by Commander Eddie; 05-11-2020, 12:57 PM.

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  • 345 DeSoto
    replied
    I had the same problem with my '56 Sky Hawk. I purchased an EPAS unit out of a Toyoto Corolla, and had it installed...night and DAY difference! PLENTY of EPAS info on the Site. Search "EPAS" on this site...

    Leave a comment:


  • JoeK
    started a topic Steering: Hard Steering

    Hard Steering

    Hi Guys I got a 55 Studebaker Champion. Previous owner installed a Studebaker 289 V8. Car runs fine only problem is it's hard steering. I checked all the steering components everything seems fine. I don't have room for power steering and as far as I can see, I don't think the block is drilled for brackets. I'm wondering if skinner tire on the front would help. I have 215/70R15s on it now. Before I spend the money on tires and possibly new wheels I need to know if this would help the hard steering problem....thanks Joe
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