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  • #16
    The chemical symbol for Tungsten is W for Wolfram. You might try that to widen your search.
    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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    • #17
      Originally posted by studegary View Post
      The chemical symbol for Tungsten is W for Wolfram. You might try that to widen your search.
      YEP..that was at the very first site of my two-day excursion on the web. But...since you don't speak with a drawl...perhaps you can do a ten-minute search and enlighten those of us who live below the Mason Dixon. (Friendly sarcasm...no charge)
      John Clary
      Greer, SC

      SDC member since 1975

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      • #18
        I file my points when they need it. If they only last half as long that is still years with the amount of driving most of us do.
        _______________
        http://stude.vonadatech.com
        https://jeepster.vonadatech.com

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Dan Timberlake View Post
          [/LIST]One of the sabotage tricks used in the Plymouth trouble shooting contests was a thin coat of clear nail polish on brand new points. The voltage drop test would make it clear where the problem was.

          Parts swappin' without confirming diagnosis netted a poor score, even if the young tech got the car running.
          And yes, back in the day, we filed points and rotor tips, filed plug gaps, sandblasted spark plug insulators; once I remember spacing apart arcing plug wires with wooden sticks and electricians tape. Today, not so much.

          FWIW, over the years, as our cars and owners have aged, I've gotten requests to help troubleshoot no-start and poor running problems. Old gas is the first suspect and after that, the most likely problem was almost always old ignition components. Now, I tell anyone asking for help, "Don't bring it here until you've drained and refilled the gas tank and changed the fuel filter, and installed new spark plugs, ignition wires, cap, rotor, points and condensor." Nine out of ten times this solves their problem and I never see the car. When a CASO says, "Well, the ignition stuff doesn't have that many miles on it." I say, "But how many years does it have on it? The components rust, oxidize, the insulation breaks down just sitting there."

          One local guy refused to replace the spark plugs on his Champion; they looked like new. When, just to prove a point, I took over and installed a new set of plugs; the car started immediately and ran perfectly. Sometimes, just being flooded one time with today's gas will leave deposits on plugs which will not be visible and the plug will still jump a spark in the open air but under compression the spark will run down the deposit on the insulator.

          jack vines
          PackardV8

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          • #20
            Sometimes, just being flooded one time with today's gas will leave deposits on plugs which will not be visible and the plug will still jump a spark in the open air but under compression the spark will run down the deposit on the insulator.

            jack vines

            I have found that to be the case a few times with lawn mowers. It was surprising, as the plug looked OK.
            RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

            17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
            10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
            10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
            4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
            5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
            56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
            60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

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