Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Shifter insulators

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Transmission / Overdrive: Shifter insulators

    Are the insulators up at the column of a column shifter the same as the insulators at the transmission. My chassis parts book has different numbers for them. 197565 for ones at transmission and 1551556 for insulators at the column. They appear to be the same.

  • #2
    They ARE Different Diameter, hence the Part Number change.
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner

    Comment


    • #3
      Thank you, StudeRich. Stude Intl. did not list them and thought they were same. I could not verify one way or another. My luck they will send me the tranny shifter ones and I actually need the column insulators.

      Comment


      • #4
        Well if you ordered 1551556 that is what you'll get, unless they are No Stock.
        It's always GOOD to talk to them and learn these things, I hate the On-Line Ordering, so I just don't.
        StudeRich
        Second Generation Stude Driver,
        Proud '54 Starliner Owner

        Comment


        • #5
          I was also wondering about the differences between the two bushings as they look very similar, so I grabbed a couple out of inventory and compared them.

          The outside diameter of the rubber parts are roughly the same, the main difference being in the thickness of the area that goes into the the shift levers, as can be seen in the photo below. The other major difference is in the inside diameter (ID) of the center metal part. The 197565 ID is .310", while the 1551556 ID is .475" as seen in the photo below. It appears 1551556 might sub for 197565, but would be "looser" where the shaft passes through it. Hope that helps.


          Click image for larger version

Name:	Bushings1.jpg
Views:	212
Size:	25.0 KB
ID:	1832665

          Click image for larger version

Name:	Bushings.jpg
Views:	175
Size:	19.4 KB
ID:	1832666

          Dan Peterson
          Montpelier, VT
          1960 Lark V-8 Convertible
          1960 Lark V-8 Convertible (parts car)

          Comment


          • #6
            Thank you dpson. Interesting how similar yet different they are. Seems like Studebaker would have designed shifter to use same insulator in both places.
            Last edited by Son O Lark; 04-27-2020, 07:30 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              So I was sent two of the same shifter arms with the insulators already installed. They appear to both be reverse arms. Now my problem is how do I remove them from the arms without damaging them? Soak in dish soap and press out? Use angle grinder and cut away the arm?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Son O Lark View Post
                So I was sent two of the same shifter arms with the insulators already installed. They appear to both be reverse arms. Now my problem is how do I remove them from the arms without damaging them? Soak in dish soap and press out? Use angle grinder and cut away the arm?
                I would place the shifter arm hanging between two sockets in a vice. Use a small 3/8 socket, maybe 7/16 inch on the steel bushing of the grommet, and a larger socket like a 1/2 inch drive 1 inch opening on the other side of the grommet. Spray the grommet with lotsa silly cone lubricant and tighten the vice.

                The small socket should push the grommet into the large socket, removing the bushing from the arm.

                Easy.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I thought about doing that. My only concern is the insulator seems very hard and I am worried about damaging it. For all I know, they were made hard to last a good while.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I replaced all 4 on my Hawk. There must be an easier way, I think I chose the worst way. I tried boiling water, that made those slippery little devils hard to handle and tried pressing them on with a vise. No go. I eventually pressed out the center sleeve so I could collapse the outer rubber enough to get them seated in the opening. Then I used some epoxy to glue the sleeves back in. The bushings on the transmission were easier and while fiddly, went in. The rubber may have hardened with age as I cannot imagine they are that difficult to install. See my thread for pictures.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X