Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Having radiator problems

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Cool/Heat: Having radiator problems

    Well, unfortunately the radiator in Daisy-Mae sprung a leak. I opened up my hood yesterday to find a superheated jet of coolant leaking out of the top from a small hole. The question is, because the leak is small, would it be a good idea to use a commercial stop-leak first? I did my research into it, and it seems like the best one for my use (if I do trust stop-leak enough) is the UK-based "K-seal".
    Jake Robinson Kaywell: Shoo-wops and doo-wops galore to the background of some fine Studes. I'm eager and ready to go!

    1962 GT Hawk - "Daisy-Mae" - she came dressed to kill in etherial green with a charming turquoise inside. I'm hopelessly in love!

  • #2
    Unfortunately Jake, those stop-leak products are a band-aid that are not going to fix the problem permanently. If there is one weak spot in the radiator, there are others waiting in line to start doing the same thing.

    Your best bet is to have it looked over by a professional. These days finding a good radiator repair place is not as easy as it once was. They will give it a good look over and recommend what comes next.

    Radiator wise, Studebaker was good about using the same product across a lot of different models. You can take you radiator out and put it in a V8 Lark or V8 Champ truck and it will be the same that they originally had - so there are many out there.

    Another option would be to talk to some of those great Studebaker parts vendors out there and see what they have. Good luck.

    Comment


    • #3
      Do not use a stop leak product. When you say, "....out of the top...", I assume that you mean the top tank. If so, have the hole soldered up, or do it yourself, and have the entire radiator checked. SI lists new production radiators for your Hawk. They may have others if you call them. With a used radiator, you may be in the same "boat" in short order.
      Gary L.
      Wappinger, NY

      SDC member since 1968
      Studebaker enthusiast much longer

      Comment


      • #4
        Florida....summertime.....radiator........ !

        Comment


        • #5
          The answer here is yes. You can use a radiator sealer but it won't be permanent. I have one that I repaired with AlumaSeal in 2005 that is still holding but the leak was caused by mechanical means as opposed to corrosion. I have been repairing my radiators since the '70s when I carried a propane torch and would pull the radiator on my DeSoto and solder it up on a trip because of a broken motor mount that allowed the fan to hit the radiator. I don't suggest this system. One of the problems is that the radiator seal doesn't know where to seal, it just finds a small passage and plugs it. A dirty, corroded system offers a lot of these places and could cause overheating problems you don't want. It really won't work on a linear leak (crack) but will be effective on a pinhole. If you use a stop leak temporarily to get you by until you get another radiator you should flush the system well and then add a good antifreeze/coolant product that will protect your cooling system.
          I love your car and your adventures with it.
          Rob

          Comment


          • #6
            If the leak is on the top tank, then buy a cheap, electric soldering iron, review a few youtube videos on soldering, then practice on a soda can. Finally, use your newly acquired tool and experience to solder the hole in your radiator tank. As part of the fix, install a 7 PSI radiator cap, available from our vendors.

            If you are not currently in a position to do any of the above, just loosen the current cap back a click to where it no longer holds pressure. Depending on where the hole is in the tank, it will leak down to that level but not much farther. If the hole is on the top of the tank, it will become a non issue. With the cap loose, even if the hole is on top of the tank, it will still puke coolant out (around the cap) till about 1 to 1.5" below the filler neck, but you will never know the difference. This is a good temp fix, that will last till you can do something better.

            Comment


            • #7
              If the radiator has sprung a leak, then the radiator needs to be removed and repaired properly which won't be inexpensive. Stop leak products are a band aid and do work but usually it isn't for long plus you run the chance of plugging something if used incorrectly. I remember years ago I was driving my 64 Champ truck outside of San Antonio Texas late on a Saturday afternoon. I got caught in a hail storm and took a hail pellet into a couple of radiator tubes which caused a good sized leak. I dumped a bottle of Barrs stop leak in it and made it back to Los Angeles before the stop leak failed. The stop leak worked temporarily and I did make it home but the radiator ended up getting recored to make a permanent repair. Bud

              Comment


              • #8
                Thank you for your suggestions everyone! After much thought, I decided to replace the radiator along with the brackets and hoses that go with it.
                Jake Robinson Kaywell: Shoo-wops and doo-wops galore to the background of some fine Studes. I'm eager and ready to go!

                1962 GT Hawk - "Daisy-Mae" - she came dressed to kill in etherial green with a charming turquoise inside. I'm hopelessly in love!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Stude Shoo-wop! View Post
                  After much thought, I decided to replace the radiator along with the brackets and hoses that go with it.
                  And while it seems minor, it would be a good time to install a new thermostat and fan belt - just easy to do with all that stuff already off and being serviced.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    A new radiator is the best way to go, but if I were a college student living on a budget, I would solder it, or have it soldered, and keep an eye on it. In five years, when you are out of school, you could replace it. Good luck with it, either way you go.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      If your radiator has a copper core, don't throw it away as it can be easily repaired. There is a shop called A1 Radiator near you that seems to have a good reputation (based on Google advices!). Best of luck with your troubles.
                      sigpic

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Old trick was to find an old pure copper penny and shine it up and use it to solder your hole shut. It may be easier than trying to solder a hole closed. NOTE: Newer pennies are copper clad, not solid copper. --- I found a penny stuck to a radiator one time and my grandfather showed my why it was there. Those old Depression guys were quite resourceful.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Son O Lark View Post
                          Old trick was to find an old pure copper penny and shine it up and use it to solder your hole shut. It may be easier than trying to solder a hole closed. NOTE: Newer pennies are copper clad, not solid copper. --- I found a penny stuck to a radiator one time and my grandfather showed my why it was there. Those old Depression guys were quite resourceful.
                          I did that on a Hawk gas tank once. Worked great.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Hi Jake,
                            Give Matthew Burnette a call at :Stephen Allen's
                            PO Box 559, Newberry FL 32669

                            Phone: 352.472.9369
                            I am sure he will advise you correctly.
                            Luck, Bill

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              That was my dads trick as well. With real copper pennies. If the car is cooling properly, and no other signs of corrosion, I would patch it, and run it for a while.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X