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  • Engine: cam recommendations

    1962 Lark wagon 259 V8 2V. I am currently in the process of having my engine rebuilt. It has been bored .020, new valves and valve springs, new pistons, rings and bearings. I have a four barrel and dual exhaust to help it breath better. I hadn't thought of it before, but two things just came to mind. I was going to mill the head, but now I am thinking how much can I remove before I have to mill the intake. I am also thinking that a little more cam may help. I don't want a screamer, the wagon will be used primarily to tow my racecar and some driving to shows. Maybe the stock cam will give me the best torque curve, but I don't know. Any suggestions welcome.
    Thank you
    Warren

  • #2
    For towing Randall around use, the OEMcam is hard to beat.Also, anything you do to raise the compression, i..e. shave the heads, will increase operating temp of the motor. I once had a pair of heads shaved .030" and as you mentioned, had to slightly modify the intake manifold. More importantly, by100,000 miles, I had all but ran out of valve adjustment threads on the pushrods. A stock 259 is tough to beat for all around performance (off idle to around 4000 RPM), operating temp, and MPG. JMHO

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    • #3
      FWIW, for towing, forget about the cam change unless you're willing to step up for custom head work and the new Racer Brown cam grind Bill Ozzard has come up with. We just did a 308" for him which looks very promising in the dyno simulation. It has good top end power while increasing the low speed torque.

      You mention you've already bought new stock valve springs, but R1 springs don't cost that much more and would have been my recommendation. Sometimes, when towing with a wide ratio transmission, it's necessary to wind it tighter for a while. The stock springs are pretty weak.

      We'd square deck the block, usually removing only .010"-.015" and surface the heads about the same amount. Use the steel shim head gaskets and block off the intake exhaust crossover with a thin stainless steel plate. Towing builds heat and you don't want any that can be avoided. Remove the guts from the exhaust manifold butterfly heat riser valve, tap and plug the shaft holes with short bolts; again, don't keep any heat in that can be gotten out. Use heavy gauge straight-through mufflers, not the Cherry Bomb junk . Towing requires more throttle and the drone with separated pipes can be maddening at some cruise RPM so consider adding an H-pipe crossover.

      jack vines
      Last edited by PackardV8; 04-14-2020, 09:46 AM.
      PackardV8

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      • #4
        Thanks guys, this is really what I wanted to hear. Jack, I read some stuff here on an old thread but too much stuff about R1 cams and I don't want to lose torque and I'm not interested in a high reving. I am running a T5 with a 2.95 low gear. I like the .010-.015 on both surfaces and I have steel shim head gaskets. I am not adverse to the R1 spring, where can they be purchased?
        Thanks
        Warren

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        • #5
          Avanti and Jet Thrust R1/R2 Valve Springs are "everywhere", at Studebaker Vendors, # 188645.

          https://studebakervendors.com
          StudeRich
          Second Generation Stude Driver,
          Proud '54 Starliner Owner

          Comment


          • #6
            JACK VINES - Can you Post more info on "the new Racer Brown cam grind"? Any cam grind which would improve low end torque AND do something for the top end HP is outstanding news...

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            • #7
              Originally posted by 345 DeSoto View Post
              JACK VINES - Can you Post more info on "the new Racer Brown cam grind"? Any cam grind which would improve low end torque AND do something for the top end HP is outstanding news...
              Bill Ozzard will be installing the engine and eventually reporting on real world performance. All we have at present is a DynoSim comparison of it versus the R1 and R2+ standards. It has better torque from 1500 on up and equal horsepower at 4500 RPM.

              BTW, installing a performance cam without head, valve and spring work is a waste of time. Top end power requires additional air flow beyond what the stock head ports and valves will support.

              jack vines

              PackardV8

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              • #8
                As Jack said don't use the standard valve springs. After some miles you can start to get valve float even below the speed where you get maximum hp on a 259.
                David L

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                • #9
                  For every .010" you mill off the heads, mill .0167” off the intake flanges.
                  (Stude V8 specific)


                  Originally posted by wuga View Post
                  1962 Lark wagon 259 V8 2V. <snip> I was going to mill the head, but now I am thinking how much can I remove before I have to mill the intake. <snip>
                  Thank you
                  Warren
                  HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                  Jeff


                  Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                  Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK View Post
                    For every .010" you mill off the heads, mill .0167” off the intake flanges.
                    (Stude V8 specific)



                    When milling the heads .030" or more, how would you deal with the push rods being too long? Thanks

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      On '62-'64 engines, one can use the '51-'61 pushrods.

                      jack vines
                      PackardV8

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by JoeHall View Post

                        When milling the heads .030" or more, how would you deal with the push rods being too long? Thanks
                        Just curious, when Studebaker went from the composite head gasket at .045 to the shim gasket at .017, did they change push rods and intake manifolds to accommodate the difference?
                        78 Avanti RQB 2792
                        64 Avanti R1 R5408
                        63 Avanti R1 R4551
                        63 Avanti R1 R2281
                        62 GT Hawk V15949
                        56 GH 6032504
                        56 GH 6032588
                        55 Speedster 7160047
                        55 Speedster 7165279

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by 64studeavanti View Post

                          Just curious, when Studebaker went from the composite head gasket at .045 to the shim gasket at .017, did they change push rods and intake manifolds to accommodate the difference?
                          I don't think so. I always use thin gaskets, and once milled a set of heads .030", only to run out of valve adjustment by 100,000 miles. That had never happened before, although it's also possible the heads had been milled some before too, but I'd say little if any. Though not likely, if I were to run those heads again, I'd either use thick gaskets (not preferable) or somehow shorten the pushrods.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JoeHall View Post

                            I don't think so. I always use thin gaskets, and once milled a set of heads .030", only to run out of valve adjustment by 100,000 miles. That had never happened before, although it's also possible the heads had been milled some before too, but I'd say little if any. Though not likely, if I were to run those heads again, I'd either use thick gaskets (not preferable) or somehow shorten the pushrods.
                            Joe, maybe you were using reground valves and reground seats? Then, after 100,000 miles the seats and valve faces wore in. If you installed hard seats and new valves, chances are there'd be plenty of adjustment in the new components.

                            jack vines

                            PackardV8

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by JoeHall View Post

                              I don't think so. I always use thin gaskets, and once milled a set of heads .030", only to run out of valve adjustment by 100,000 miles. That had never happened before, although it's also possible the heads had been milled some before too, but I'd say little if any. Though not likely, if I were to run those heads again, I'd either use thick gaskets (not preferable) or somehow shorten the pushrods.
                              I am confused. Going from the composite head gaskets to the shim is the same as milling the heads .030. Why wouldn't that require different intake manifold and new pushrods?
                              78 Avanti RQB 2792
                              64 Avanti R1 R5408
                              63 Avanti R1 R4551
                              63 Avanti R1 R2281
                              62 GT Hawk V15949
                              56 GH 6032504
                              56 GH 6032588
                              55 Speedster 7160047
                              55 Speedster 7165279

                              Comment

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