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For ENGINES , Liquid MOLY oil additive (has ceramic properties )

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  • Engine: For ENGINES , Liquid MOLY oil additive (has ceramic properties )

    ANYONE HAVE EXPERIENCE with LIQUID MOLY additive , used in Engines ?

  • #2
    To look at the other side of this question, what are you seeing which makes you think today's oils require additives?

    jack vines
    PackardV8

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    • #3
      I do not know what you mean by; "ceramic properties". I can not understand why you would want something as hard and abrasive as ceramic in your oil.
      Gary L.
      Wappinger, NY

      SDC member since 1968
      Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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      • #4
        Just MORE Snake Oil, Billions of Engines are running Fine without it.
        If you need an Engine Overhaul or Rebuild, just DO IT! This stuff will not.
        StudeRich
        Second Generation Stude Driver,
        Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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        • #5
          Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
          To look at the other side of this question, what are you seeing which makes you think today's oils require additives?

          jack vines
          For so many years now, our lubricant companies under NLGI and API have thankfully added synthetic ingredients to our mineral oils. Straight oil is pretty dismal when it comes to lubricating internal combustion engines and transmissions.

          From hyperlube.com: anywhere from 15-30% of our motor oil is an additive package!


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          • #6
            Originally posted by NCDave51 View Post

            For so many years now, our lubricant companies under NLGI and API have thankfully added synthetic ingredients to our mineral oils. Straight oil is pretty dismal when it comes to lubricating internal combustion engines and transmissions.

            From hyperlube.com: anywhere from 15-30% of our motor oil is an additive package!

            That photo is about an inch tall
            64 GT Hawk (K7)
            1970 Avanti (R3)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by NCDave51 View Post

              For so many years now, our lubricant companies under NLGI and API have thankfully added synthetic ingredients to our mineral oils. Straight oil is pretty dismal when it comes to lubricating internal combustion engines and transmissions.

              From hyperlube.com: anywhere from 15-30% of our motor oil is an additive package!

              Not to speak for Jack but my reply would be the same to that post. Yes today's oils contain, as you stated, a myriad of additives to balance the lubrication properties (cling, viscosity, corrosion resistance, etc.) developed over years of testing and knowledge. The answer was (I submit) "why would someone add an additional compound that could/would change/deteriorate the additives that exist in the oil". Very little chemistry is practiced in the backyard these days so I believe we're are all on the same page here about additional components in today's oils.

              Bob

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              • #8
                Where do you find AutoMoly? Looked for it a while back but no joy. Jim Lester was a huge fan of it; said it was an amazing friction reducer and he gained measurable horsepower with it.

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                • #9
                  I do not understand why so many here cite lack of science to support this additive, yet many fo the same folks say there's plenty of science to support ZDDP as a badly needed additive for our Stude motors. Other than, "anecdotal" (current buzz word) evidence, I have seen nothing to support any oil additive.

                  I recently talked with a guy on Facebook whose mega high performance BBC motor (in a LARK) had flattened a cam lobe and destroyed a cam bearing within a few minutes of initial startup. Therefore the lesson for all Studebaker owners, he said, is that ZDDP is critical in our flat tappet motors. I pointed out that his BBC is not a Studebaker motor, and the aggressive cam with triple valve springs produce 3-5 times more spring pressure at rest and max lift, than any OEM Studebaker valve train. He then wanted to change the subject and said I was just a purist, upset because he had a brand x motor in his Stude. Guess I just don't connect the scientific dots as well as others. LOL

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                  • #10
                    I can't remember the name of it but years ago there was a "moly product on the market that was touted by some commercial vehicle users. The gist of the product is it is supposed to work like tiny ball bearings and reduce friction. My boss fell for the sales pitch and supposedly scientific testing and we used it all the company rigs. I could see no difference in engine smoothness or any power gain as the ads said you would immediately see an rpm increase at idle from the lack of friction within engine parts. Didn't show on my tach or any other place so I agree with Rich..."snake oil".

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                    • #11
                      The only flat tappet camshaft engines that need something other than what is already in today's bread and butter motor oils are the HIGH LIFT, HIGH SPRING PRESSURE high performance motors. Those need some additional ZDDP. How you want to get that ZDDP in there is your choice. Plenty of oils available that have it already. The only additive I would trust would be GM engine oil supplement. But that is just my preference. No data to back it up.

                      Back to additives. Back in the late 70's I worked at an independent dealership with an old guy named Roy. We all called him grandpa. He was born in 1900 and was a great mechanic and very colorful fellow (i.e. very politically incorrect). I grew my hair a bit longer one year, and wore a head band. He called me a "blanket ass." The Mexican American was a "pepper belly". Stuff you can't say today. That's right, at age 77, he was still wrenching for a living. He would always come and get me when rebuilding a carb, as he could not see well enough for the fine adjustments, and getting some of the tiny linkage parts back together.

                      I could write a whole season worth of sitcoms using Roy as the main character. Just have to relay one story. We had a guy that did nothing but oil changes. A kid brought his Blazer in for an oil change. There was a can of additive sitting on the fender. I don't remember the name, but something like "TefGuard" which supposedly contained some kind of teflon treatment that was going to reduce the friction so much that one would likely have to reset the idle. The kid that owned the Blazer was standing by the vehicle as the tech was draining the oil (used to could do that in the old days). As the car came back down, Roy is walking by and picks up the can of additive. "What the hell is this stuff? Kid starts to describe it to him. Roy says: "Who told you to put this crap in there?" "Well", says the kid, "my dad told me to do it". Roy: "He don't know chit. May as well just back off and piss in it." Puts the can back down and walks away. I have always been suspicious of additives. If they are so great, don't you think a manufacturer would spec it for their cars, just to get some advantage?
                      Last edited by Lynn; 04-13-2020, 09:20 PM. Reason: Spelling

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                      • #12
                        I guess some of you guys are not old enough to remember stories of the problems that all of the early OHV V8's had with flat cams. It was common knowledge during the 50's Cadillac, Chrysler and Studebaker all had the issue. This in spite of the fact that only Studebaker used solid lifters. It was also understood that the addition of phosphorous and zinc was instrumental in eliminating the problem. There was a rather lengthy article in the 80's written by a Valvoline chemist. It highlighted the post war historical changes in motor oil and gave a rundown of the why, when, and by whom the changes took place.

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                        • #13
                          IF...the bottle says...shake well, or shake thoroughly...drop it like the proverbial hot potato.

                          Mike

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                          • #14
                            the product I purchased is CERATEK---not to fix a problem, I just made the purchase---not for my studebaker----it used in motor & trans
                            I have no backup for efficacy---dont know if its snake oil or a benefitial additive

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