Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What do I have?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Rear Axle: What do I have?

    I posted a pic yesterday of an original 1962 Order Form on the “Champ -7E” registry forum, then I got to wonder.

    I clearly have a 3.31 rear end, from the tag that gives the 43-13 tooth set-up (and resultant 3.31 ratio) as well verifying 20 driveshaft rotations for a little over 6 wheel rotations. However, my original build sheet shows I should have had a 4.09 axle behind the 259 it originally had as well.

    Given that the 259 was transplanted out for the current 289 (eng # PJ305) at some point, this rear axle came from somewhere else as well.

    Did any of the Studebaker cars -especially any of the 289-donor cars - use a 3.31 rear end??

    Thanks in advance.

  • #2
    Sorry meant to add the Order Form - this 3.31 was never a truck option on any engine or chassis combo.

    Comment


    • #3
      I can't really read that sideways, but it does not appear to be a "Order Form" for a Particular Truck, just a Chart of available options that can be selected?

      Anyway you are correct, your Production Oder very well could say your Truck was ordered with a 4.09 Ratio Rear Axle, that is normal for a 3 Speed Manual or special order with an Overdrive 3 Speed Trans. TRUCK.

      The 3.31 Was THE Most common in '58 to '66 Studebaker CARS with direct Transmissions, 3 Speed Manual, 4 Speed Manual and Automatic.
      So that would make the Ring and Pinion Set from a Car a good Ratio for a "Cruiser" Highway/Interstate capable, NO load Truck.

      The Complete Dana Model 44 Differential Assembly would not fit a Truck, too narrow.

      The 3.31 Ratio was not available in Trucks because of the "Possible" 2034 Lb. Load Capacity of your 5000 Lb. Gross 1/2 Ton Pickup.
      Last edited by StudeRich; 03-31-2020, 09:36 AM.
      StudeRich
      Second Generation Stude Driver,
      Proud '54 Starliner Owner

      Comment


      • #4
        Rich:

        To the right of the diff cover there is a clear “44-1” casting mark. A Dana of some sort has somehow fit in here.

        The pic above is of an actual 1962 Order Form I managed to find, page 2 of 4. Page 3 was for Transtars, page 4 for the Diesel.

        If you’re seeing this on a computer, here it is posted again upright...for those on a phone or tablet, hold it flat and rotate it 😊.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by NCDave51 View Post
          Rich:

          To the right of the diff cover there is a clear “44-1” casting mark. A Dana of some sort has somehow fit in here.
          NCDave, what StudeRich meant was that the complete Dana 44 assembly from a Studebaker passenger car would not fit properly in a Stude truck because the car rear axle is narrower.
          Paul
          Winston-Salem, NC
          Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

          Comment


          • #6
            Many thanks - from next door here in Greensboro!

            Comment


            • #7
              Someone transplanted a 3.31 ring and pinion into your model 44 carrier. If you're not gonna use your truck as a truck, that's a good thing.
              Skip Lackie

              Comment


              • #8
                Wow I am Sorry, I guess I need to go back to 6th. Grade English 101 !

                I just don't see how what Paul said is ANY different than what I said.

                But I do see that you did not understand that Dana 44's were used in BOTH 289 Cars AND 1/2 Ton Trucks.

                They just have different Axle Housing VERSIONS, the "Guts in the Pumpkins" are "mostly the same", except Axles, Bearings and Spider (Side) Gears.
                StudeRich
                Second Generation Stude Driver,
                Proud '54 Starliner Owner

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks everyone for the great info - good clarifications for me.

                  The most I’ve hauled is about 200 lbs of brush and about the same as soil/mulch. Nothing more than the weight of an average passenger back there.

                  With the 289, 11” HD clutch and 4-speed manual trans, I’m just wondering what the caveat is with having the 3.31 and load limit? Are the “guts” not up to the task, or is it a torque issue, etc?

                  thanks

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The Truck was actually Rated to carry 2,034 Lbs. so the 180 H.P. Engine without Huge Torque needed that gearing to properly move that Load. Highways and Interstates were not moving at 70 to 80 MPH as they now do in many States.

                    Most Trucks in those days were used on slower local Roads and on Farms, not to take "Soccer Mom's" to the Hair Salon.
                    The 4 Speed with Compound Low would help it get moving, but to sustain a constant speed in High Gear with a Load, going up hills takes all the help it can get or the engine will be "Lugging", overheating and possible excess wear or damage will occur.

                    Remember that Studebaker Engineers had one of the most comprehensive Test Tracks in the World, with every possible Hill, Curve, High Speed Oval, Water Pit, Mud Hole etc. to test and develop their Vehicles on, so they always overbuilt their Trucks to handle anything.
                    Last edited by StudeRich; 03-31-2020, 10:37 PM.
                    StudeRich
                    Second Generation Stude Driver,
                    Proud '54 Starliner Owner

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X