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inside seat springs, Fluffy lint like filler??

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  • Interior: inside seat springs, Fluffy lint like filler??

    Inside the seat coil springs this fluffy “lint” filling? What is it? Why is it? I guess it’s alsays been there, this is a 64 Cruiser with red broadcloth interior. So any info?

  • #2
    It's cotton. They call it kapok in the upholstery business.
    Mice love it for nest building.
    Bez Auto Alchemy
    573-318-8948
    http://bezautoalchemy.com


    "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

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    • #3
      Originally posted by bezhawk View Post
      It's cotton. They call it kapok in the upholstery business.
      Mice love it for nest building.
      That's for sure. Been there. Don't be surprised if you find a huge accumulation of it in one spot sometime.

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      • #4
        If it's actually "Inside the seat coil springs", it was put there by a rodent, not by Studebaker employees.
        "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

        Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
        Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
        '33 Rockne 10,
        '51 Commander Starlight,
        '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée",
        '56 Sky Hawk

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        • #5
          thats possible I suppose. But....all gone now. Cleaner inside now than my wife’s Mini

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          • #6
            I hate the OEM coil spring seats, which Stude used all the way through 1966. When younger they were tolerable, but today I drove the 56J about 200 miles and my back is killing me. LOL I have done all I can to make this 56J's seats tolerable for my aging back: tennis ball halves inside the springs, thick canvas over the spring bed, memory foam, etc.. It's just the design, which worked great back in the day, but is near crippling now. I sat in a66 Cruiser at South Bend a few years ago, and it sat the same as the 56J. Also recall my older brother's 49 Stude pickup, which sat the same, even after totally rebuilt. I am thinking of trying one more time; maybe graft the guts from an early 2000s Chrysler Sebring convertible seat into the 56J seat structure somehow (driver side only) so it is not visible. I have Sebrings in both GTs, and can sit in them all day with no back problems or discomfort.
            Last edited by JoeHall; 03-04-2020, 02:24 PM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by JoeHall View Post
              I hate the OEM coil spring seats, It's just the design, which worked great back in the day, but is near crippling now.
              Joe, if you feel up to it, you might try removing your cushion covers (unhook all the hog rings and expose the cushion itself). Then cut a piece of something like that sturdy nylon loop indoor outdoor carpet, or something equally sturdy yet flexible. Make it exactly fit the cushion and place it under the batting but above the burlap; then replace the covers with new hog rings.
              It helps distribute your body weight over a larger spring surface, and I've found it's made my '51 comfortable to drive for hours at a time.

              I first got this idea when I experienced intense back issues when driving. Then I bought one of those cheap seat cushions with the wire coils inside a woven surface (seemed to be a standard must-have item for truckers a couple decades ago). Simply expanding my weight distribution over the existing springs made the difference. Maybe try that as a cheap first step; see if it helps, as well as determine how stiff you need the support.
              "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

              Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
              Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
              '33 Rockne 10,
              '51 Commander Starlight,
              '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée",
              '56 Sky Hawk

              Comment


              • #8
                Actually the last really great Studebaker seats were in my 50 Land Cruiser. They were 13" from the seating surface to the bottom of the springs. The springs were individually sewn into burlap pockets, then tied together with criss cross coils on the top, then burlap with wire stays, then 4" of real latex foam they type with the 1" holes cast into it. Then cotton Kapok on top of that and the toughest scotchguarded nylon upholstery on top of that. Driving all day and you step out just as nicely as if you were traveling sitting on your best couch.
                Bez Auto Alchemy
                573-318-8948
                http://bezautoalchemy.com


                "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

                Comment

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