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  • Other: Octane Boost Fuel Additive

    With the high compression of the R1 engine I am thinking of using an Octane Boost additive. Has anyone here at SDC found an additive that they found helpful? What are you using?
    1963 Studebaker GT Hawk R1 63V-33867
    1964 Studebaker Avanti R1 R-5364
    1970 Avanti II RQA-0385
    1981 Avanti II RQB-3304

  • #2
    Yes, I'd like to know as well for my R1 Avanti with AC. Close to me is a gas station that sells unleaded 110 octane to race cars and I've found that 1/2 tank of that and the rest premium eliminates knocking, but at a cost...iirc, nearly $8/g! Is it helpful (compromise, I know) to retard the timing a bit?

    Comment


    • #3
      Much has been written / posted on this topic. Check the history or enter what topic you think might have been previously discussed

      https://forum.studebakerdriversclub....ay-s-gas/page4

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by 1inxs View Post
        With the high compression of the R1 engine I am thinking of using an Octane Boost additive. Has anyone here at SDC found an additive that they found helpful? What are you using?
        I can tell you that my R1 with a/c will absolutely not run well in the heat of the summer. .....all due to what pass's as fuel today. If you really are serious, then forget all of the 'snake oil' that is sold in auto parts stores across the country. The only thing that I have found to work in the high heat of summer is actual TEL in a can. It comes in qt's which you have to 'blend" in when you gas up........the dilution ratio is listed on the outside of the can. Octane Supreme is available from only one source............"Wild Bills Corvette" outside of Boston, Ma.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by dleroux View Post
          Much has been written / posted on this topic. Check the history or enter what topic you think might have been previously discussed

          https://forum.studebakerdriversclub....ay-s-gas/page4
          I appreciate the link. As always I did research the forum prior to posting. The only results I was able to find in reference to octane is like the thread that you posted on stations that sell high octane flight fuel. Keep the info coming. Thanks
          1963 Studebaker GT Hawk R1 63V-33867
          1964 Studebaker Avanti R1 R-5364
          1970 Avanti II RQA-0385
          1981 Avanti II RQB-3304

          Comment


          • #6
            I did some research and purchased and used a product called VP Racing Fuels Octanium. I used the entire quart to a tank of gas. It is impressive, but expensive as heck! I hope to find something as good, but less money. In the back of my mind the words “you get what you pay for” comes to mind.
            1963 Studebaker GT Hawk R1 63V-33867
            1964 Studebaker Avanti R1 R-5364
            1970 Avanti II RQA-0385
            1981 Avanti II RQB-3304

            Comment


            • #7
              1. There are very good reasons TEL is no longer permitted as a gasoline additive; it's a deadly poison. A friend who's a petroleum engineer showed me scientific data, medical studies and federal regulations showing TEL is so very toxic, it is specifically federally prohibited from being retailed or shipped. JMHO, but Wild Bill is a snake oil salesman; he has found a way to describe what he's selling in vague enough terms as to stay out of jail, but it's not real TEL.

              2. There are some modifications which will help make an R1 driveable in warm weather. These suggestions aren't for restorations but for warm weather drivers.

              a. Block the exhaust heat crossover in the heads to the intake manifold with thin stainless steel sheets.
              b. Remove the exhaust manifold flapper valve which diverts heat to the now blocked intake manifold passage.
              c. A low pressure electric fuel pump.
              d. An air filter housing with a fresh air intake hose picking up air from outside the engine compartment. I used one from an '80s-'90s GM found in a U-Pik yard.
              e.. Recurve the centrifugal ignition advance to give 10 degrees initial but with the specified total advance. Also, have the vacuum advance operation and curve verified.
              f. Reverse flush the block and radiator. Refill with no more than 50% antifreeze and Water Wetter additive.
              g. Synthetic 10-40 oil
              h. Adjust the valve clearance on the tight side of .025". I sometimes go down to .023" in warm weather.
              i. Check and maintain tire pressures at the higher side of the specifications. On my radials, I run at least 32 PSI.
              j. Have a front suspension alignment. It's amazing how much drag too much or too little toe can put on an engine.
              k. At the first sound of any pinging, shift down. RPMs are better than lugging.

              jack vines
              Last edited by PackardV8; 03-05-2020, 06:06 AM.
              PackardV8

              Comment


              • #8
                I gave up on octane boosters. Even the one that came most "highly" recommended; I believe it is Torco, but not sure.

                Fouled plugs regularly.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Be VERY careful. Years ago, my best friend contracted (I believe) Aniline(?) poisoning from us mixing in Moroso Octane Booster and having the wind change direction. He got a snoot full and his sinuses bled for days. This not your average kindergartner experiment. Check with someone who is very knowledgeable as clearly we were not. If I recall correctly a human can only withstand aniline poisoning about three (3) times before death occurs. I am not a doctor so check it out thoroughly prior to usage.
                  From the internet (which never lies):
                  • "Aniline is rapidly absorbed after inhalation and ingestion. Aniline liquid and vapor are also absorbed well through skin, and this can contribute to systemic toxicity."
                  Best of luck but to me a trip to your local airport and purchasing high octane low lead at any price is better than what we experienced.
                  Bill

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
                    1. There are very good reasons TEL is no longer permitted as a gasoline additive; it's a deadly poison. A friend who's a petroleum engineer showed me scientific data, medical studies and federal regulations showing TEL is so very toxic, it is specifically federally prohibited from being retailed or shipped. JMHO, but Wild Bill is a snake oil salesman; he has found a way to describe what he's selling in vague enough terms as to stay out of jail, but it's not real TEL.

                    2. There are some modifications which will help make an R1 driveable in warm weather. These suggestions aren't for restorations but for warm weather drivers.

                    a. Block the exhaust heat crossover in the heads to the intake manifold with thin stainless steel sheets.
                    b. Remove the exhaust manifold flapper valve which diverts heat to the now blocked intake manifold passage.
                    c. A low pressure electric fuel pump.
                    d. An air filter housing with a fresh air intake hose picking up air from outside the engine compartment. I used one from an '80s-'90s GM found in a U-Pik yard.
                    e.. Recurve the centrifugal ignition advance to give 10 degrees initial but with the specified total advance. Also, have the vacuum advance operation and curve verified.
                    f. Reverse flush the block and radiator. Refill with no more than 50% antifreeze and Water Wetter additive.
                    g. Synthetic 10-40 oil
                    h. Adjust the valve clearance on the tight side of .025". I sometimes go down to .023" in warm weather.
                    i. Check and maintain tire pressures at the higher side of the specifications. On my radials, I run at least 32 PSI.
                    j. Have a front suspension alignment. It's amazing how much drag too much or too little toe can put on an engine.
                    k. At the first sound of any pinging, shift down. RPMs are better than lugging.

                    jack vines
                    Jack you make me laugh!. Snake Oil?............lets see.........I have used the product for over 15 years. In the heat of the summer I can take the car out on the Expressway and stand on the gas through all four gears and have no ping or detonation....now why do you think that is? I have turned on friends with "vettes, mopars, etc.........and all continue to use Bills "Snake Oil". Now don't you think if the product was "Snake Oil" i would have long ago heard about it? If handled with care the product posses no danger. I am not from the school that preaches the sky is falling, my stated experience and those of my friends are our own..........you are entitled to your opinion(s)...mine are markedly different.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Jack is right there is absolutely no lead on any over the counter product available to consumers to add to gasoline. It is still against the law. The reason they can't sell it is it can't be regulated if there was some spilled into the ground water or sewers. If someone says its product has TEL (tetra ethyl lead) they are lying, plain and simple actual fact. You CAN buy low lead blended fuel pre mixed from friendly small airports, but they have to add in the federal and state road taxes to legally sell it to you.
                      Last edited by bezhawk; 03-06-2020, 04:39 AM.
                      Bez Auto Alchemy
                      573-318-8948
                      http://bezautoalchemy.com


                      "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I had these thoughts when building my champ pickup motor. At first I thought I was just going to swap my tired 259 car motor it had for a R3 I knew of. Call me a barbarian bit I thought the higher performance R3 would have made a better workhorse for truck stuff like towing and hauling and things. But when I sat and looked at things I decided to build mine. I didn’t want to pay through the nose for fuel and have to worry about pinging or other things. (I live at 4800 feet elevation). I decided to swap a 289 crank and used the 570 heads I had with the thin head gaskets.

                        My opinion if someone were to ask me would be 1) swap heads for truck heads
                        or 2) install dished pistons. You just need to drop compression slightly. Yes both answers lower power but a studebaker with a tick less power is still a lot more fun than one you can’t afford to drive or can’t drive flat out.

                        Might be hard medicine but today’s gasoline sucks, so if one still wants to daily drive their studebaker. . . One must make the necessary adaptations to do so.

                        Good luck

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by thehotrodder View Post
                          I had these thoughts when building my champ pickup motor. At first I thought I was just going to swap my tired 259 car motor it had for a R3 I knew of. Call me a barbarian bit I thought the higher performance R3 would have made a better workhorse for truck stuff like towing and hauling and things. But when I sat and looked at things I decided to build mine. I didn’t want to pay through the nose for fuel and have to worry about pinging or other things. (I live at 4800 feet elevation). I decided to swap a 289 crank and used the 570 heads I had with the thin head gaskets.

                          My opinion if someone were to ask me would be 1) swap heads for truck heads
                          or 2) install dished pistons. You just need to drop compression slightly. Yes both answers lower power but a studebaker with a tick less power is still a lot more fun than one you can’t afford to drive or can’t drive flat out.

                          Might be hard medicine but today’s gasoline sucks, so if one still wants to daily drive their studebaker. . . One must make the necessary adaptations to do so.

                          Good luck
                          I still kick myself because back when I had the engine rebuilt I wanted to swap the R1 heads for low compression truck heads, I think of 8 8 to 1 ratio. Well the re builder said why bother.......so he went ahead and just rebuilt the engine as if it were 1964......including the use of SS valves which were subjected to a three angle valve job. So when ever I sell the car it will be up to the new owner to remove the heads and enjoy the joy of motor-vating with no stress.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by bezhawk View Post
                            Jack is right there is absolutely no lead on any over the counter product available to consumers to add to gasoline. It is still against the law. The reason they can't sell it is it can't be regulated if there was some spilled into the ground water or sewers. If someone says its product has TEL (tetra ethyl lead) they are lying, plain and simple actual fact. You CAN buy low lead blended fuel pre mixed from friendly small airports, but they have to add in the federal and state road taxes to legally sell it to you.
                            LOL.........I stand by my former post........ AIRPORTS??????????????? Like one can just drive out to JFK International Airport in NYC and gas up!!!.......please.......Brad care to hazard the reason my car does not ping in the high heat of summer when I mix in ten ozs of my Snake Oil? Oh well, time to see if the face masks came in to my local drug store. Eight million folks walking all over this place.....and hacking/sneezing;-(
                            Last edited by Hawklover; 03-06-2020, 11:39 AM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              This is an interesting topic. I did a little searching and can not find anything conclusive. That said this may be an argument regarding what is available in gasoline as sold from a station and an additive sold on the shelf. Everything I found regarding the ban of TEL related to its use AS SOLD IN gasoline. I also found statements that lead free fuel still contains marginal amounts of lead.

                              Perhaps this comes down to Fat Free and Alcohol Free products scenarios. As I understand it if the food product is less than .5 grams fat per serving or .5% alcohol it is deemed free of those aspects. So, it is at least conceivable that TEL is available but it is intended to be mixed in ratios that keep it under the cut off point to be deemed "free" of TEL. I'm not stating that as fact, simply plausible. The Wild Bill's Corvette site does state specifically that TEL is in the product. Perhaps in the ratios stated for "Intended Use" it sits below the threshold. That said, (wink-wink) people mix it to their satisfaction.
                              '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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